ms 3251 1829-1833 box 2 vol 3

ECHOES OF BUSHRANGING  Days in Van Diemen’s Land: BRADY, McCABE, PERRY, GEFFREYS and BRITTON
1829 – 1833
Manuscript 3251. Collection of the National Library of Australia.
box 2   vol  3  1829-1833

TRANSCRIPT:

p1

Launceston May 8th 1826

Sir,

I request you will be pleased to move HIS HONOUR the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR to grant a Licence for the solemnization of Marriage, without Publication of Banns, between

Ralph Compton Single Man of Norfolk Plains Port Dalrymple and

Jane White Single

Woman of Norfolk Plains Port Dalrymple

And I do hereby aver, that no lawful Impediment exists to the said Marriage, and that both Parties are above Twenty-one Years of Age.

I have the honour to be,

SIR,

Your most obedient Servant

John Youl

Chaplain

To Captain Montagu Charles Arthur Esq

Secrerary to

HIS HONOR the Lieutenant Governors,

&c  &c  &c

p2 [small a5 page]

Dear Sir or Madam: We the undersigned being desirous to enter into the Holy state of Matrimony would feel obliged by your publishing the  Bands for Us in Saint Johns Church tomorrow morning. We are Both residents of this Town Late of Norfolk Plains

Signed  Ralph Compton

Jane White

Witness

John Fawkner

July 7 1827

P3

[other side of letter page]

RevM? Norman

Mr Booth

Edwin Thomas

P4

OHM L

Charles Arthur Esq

Private Secretary

To hi Excellency Lt Geo Arthur

&c &c &c

Hobart Town

Revd  J Youl

P5

One

Police Office Launceston

19th Novr 1829

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith the Petition of Richard James and to inform you that in reference to the Black Book in this office one of the leaves is missing but by the second of October 1826 it appears Richard James was acquitted of the charge of staling eleven ducks the property of William Roach.

I have

Sgd  W Lyttleton

POL  19th Novr 1829

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 12th instant 8698/26 calling for a copy of the proceedings in the case of James McGarrett 49 per Minerva I have the honor to enclose here with full copies of the proceedings against him and also of those in the case of Richard Bakers which appears to be connected with that of McGarrett.

I regret that I found it impossible to forward those papers by last Monday past in consequence of a deficiency in the numbers of my Clerks and one of them being sick on that day.

It may not be improper would that I am informed by Constable Andrew Rhine that McGarrett has recently given him such information as has led to the apprehension

P6 two

Of James McCabe who fled from Sydney charged with horse stealing and that McGarrett has promised to render further assistance to Rhind in the execution of this duty.

I have

Sigd W Lyttleton

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

POL23rd Nov 1829

Sir

I have the honor to annex copy of a memorandum left at this office on Saturday last by George Powell who states he has not yet received his conditional pardon – it appears by the Book in this office that Powells description was taken by Mr Mulgrave and provided to your office on the 2nd of last Febry, I have therefore to request you will be pleased to transmit to this office the document alluded to in the memorandum that it may be issued to the said George Powell.

I have…

Josiah Spode Esq JP

To L of Convicts

P7

Three

POL 22nd March 1829

3 o clock PM

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith a copy of the information of John Clark (who has just been brought to the hospital) on order that you may use every means in your power for the apprehension of the offenders.

Clark appears to be in so weak a state from loss of blood and the length of time he had lain upon the Road that I could not obtain further particulars of the transaction. I cannot help observing that although the poor man says he thinks one of the men was not Bevan that the description of them tallies with those of that notorious bushranger and his companion Britton

I have…

Capt Smith JP

POL 20th Nov 1829

I have the honor to enclose herewith copies of the information of Field Police constable John Clark which was obtained with difficulty about 3 o clock yesterday afternoon immediately on his arrival at Hospital and I regret to add the poor man died.

I lost no time in communicating the circumstance to the Police Magistrate at Norfolk Plains and parties were sent from Launceston in search of the offenders, Memo – this letter continued by Mr Lyttleton

P8 four

POL 22nd Nov 1829

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith the memorial of Police Character of William Axford/Asford and regret to add that I cannot furnish the explanation required in your letter of the 13th instant as the Records of the Commandants at George Town contain no entires between the 29th f march and the 17th of April 1822 nor any convictions against Asford in that year, and Mr Kenworthy had no recollection of this matter.

I have….

PA Mulgrave JP

CF Police Magistrate

P9 five

POL 23rd Nov 1829

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith application of Charles Foxton?? To be appointed a District Constable for the Tamar and application of John Cummings George Radford and George Pyle for the situations of District Constable vice Samuel Sharbeck/Herbert? Removed to the solication??? Of Superintendent of the Factory at George Town and I have to inform you that Petty Constable Robert Whittington 318 CF per Lady Nelson was suspended from his office on the 13th instant for neglect of duty and Drunkenness and that John Moore per Sir Godrey Welstonfeld??? Was sworn in as acting Constable on his stead on the same day

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL 26th Nov 1829

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Copy of a warrant upon which John McCabe has been apprehended by Constable Andrew Rhind and lodged in Gaol here and fearing that if he was sent to Sydney by one of the Trading Vessels from this Port without being guarded by a constable or other Peace Officer he would effect his escape I request to be informed what steps

P10

Are to be taken to convey him to Sydney

I have…

Chief Police magistrate  &c &c

POL 30th Nov 1829

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 27th inst requiring the particulars of Margaret Burton who is reported to have absconded from the service of Mr Alexander Paterson on the 20th instant I have the honor to inform you that there are no indents of Margaret Burton either at this office or that of the assistant superintendent … of convicts at Launceston on enquiry of her late master it appears she came by the Mermaid, her sentence is fourteen years and that she was assigned to Mr Paterson at Hobart Town on the 12th July 1828

I have the…

JH Moore Esq  JP

Muster Master

Returned the Petition of Henry Stephens to Mr Spode report favourable

P11 seven

POL 30th Nov 1829

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that Joseph Bass per Woodford, Life, was this day sworn in as Petty Constable at Launceston subject to the approval of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor and that Morgan Williams per Medway is recommended for the Field Police in lieu of John Gardiner per Globe .326. employed under the Direction of Mr John Batman  should these persons be approved of they will complete the number of Constables at present allowed for this District.

I have the honor to be…

CF Police Magistrate

POL 20th Nov 1829

Sir,

With reference to the Government Police of the 27th Oct 1829 no.237, I have the honor to enclose herewith Return of assigned servants in this District as received from their Employers together with a list of the same and I request to add that the want of a new and completed Register of the convicts in this District prevents me forwarding ?? their nweracy???

I have…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

P12 eght

POL 30th Nov 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to inform you that John Grant per Caledonia holding a Ticket of Leave was permitted to leave the Office on the 8th of Oct last when he had been for several years employed as Clerk, and thus I have great need of another Clerk to fill his place, I therefore request you will be pleased to move His Excellency the Lieut. Governor to permit Thomas Brennan? Per Admiral Cockburn who was convicted at the last Criminal Session in Launceston and has since been confined in Gaol have? To be employed as Clerk in this Office in lieu of Grant. His Excellency  may be pleased to direct an efficient Clerk to be forwarded from Hobart Town to this office at an early convenience.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

CF  P Magistrate

P13 nine

POL 7th Decr 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith Mr Hinksman?? Letter together with abstract  of salary and allowance due to him as received this day for my signature.

I have…

The Honorable

John  Burnett Esq

POL 7th Decr 1829

Sir

It having become questionable at this office whether a Prisoner of the Crown is an eligible person to file an information against a free inhabitant of the colony for harbouring runaway convicts and illegally redriling???? Spiritous liquor and it has been stated that an information framed in the name of a Convict Felon against a free person would not support conviction and that all such informations at Hobart Town and other Police  Stations are framed in the name of the Chief Constable or other respectable Officers I should feel obliged if you would favor me with your opinion on this lead at your earliest convenience.

I have the honor to be Sir

PA Mulgrave Esq

CF Magistrate.

P14 ten

POL 13th Dec 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith unfixed contingent abstract for the Quarter ending the 30th of Sept. 1829 and also return of claims made at this office up to the same period and as I conceive? Those accounts should be made out on printed forms of which I am not furnished.

I should feel obliged if you would direct the requisite forms to be forwarded to this office as soon as convenient, – I have not signed the abstracts as it appears to require the signature of M Gordon who was Police Magistrate here at the time, and I am informed by by Chief Clerk that he more than once pointed out to that office the expediency of forwarding those accounts at the immediate termination of the Quarter to which they relate.

I have the honor to be &

W Lyttleton

CF Police Magistrate

Memo for copy of those documents see the memo books.

POL 14th Dec 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith  copy of the proceedings against William Watson per Albion as requested by your letter of the 11th instant.

I have

Dudley? Fereday Esq

Sheriff

P15 eleven

POL 14 Dec 1829

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 10th inst. Respecting Margaret Burton per Mermaid I have the Honor to inform you that upon an enquiry made by Mr Paterson amongst his servants it appears that Margaret Burton arrived in the Colony by the name of Margaret Wall an that her husband [blank] Burton  is now at Sydney and I regret to add that I cannot furnish any further particulars of that female.

I have….

JH Mone (Moore?) Esq

Muster Master

POL 14th Dec 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith abstracts with the signature of James Murray affixed thereto who requests that the money may be made payable through the house of Dr CG Hull

Geo? Bages/Boyes? Esq

POL  15th Decr

Gentlemen

I am required by the Police Magistrate to beg your attendance at this office on any convenient day of the present week to state the exact manner in which you wish to serve against the Bushrangers

P16 twelve

And the black native people

Messrs Liddle & Cameron

Patersons Plains

Jno Bell/Rel?

CF Black

POL 21st Decr 1829

Sir,

I have the Honor to enclose herewith Returns of assigned servants as received at this office since my general returns was forwarded on the 30th of Novr according to the Govt. Order No 237.

I have…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

POL 21st Decr 1829

Sir,

I respectfully beg leave to call your attention to my letter of this 30th ultimo respecting the appointment of a Clerk in lieu of John Grant and to remind you that the business of this office requires a clerk should be furnished in his stead with as little delay as possible.

PA Mulgrave Esq.

P17 thirteen

Police Office 21st Dec 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to forward by next messenger some private? Forms or permits for the removal of wine or spirits and some summonses for principals ???????? a very few of these forms and none of the latter.

PA Mulgrave esq

POL 27th Decr 1829

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith Certificate of Freedom of George Pass No195 for completion

I have….

Josiah Spode Esq

POL 27th Dec 1829  [X in purple pencil]

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 11th instant enclosing the applications of Messieurs Cameron and Liddle /returns herewith/ to be employed in pursuit of Bushrangers and the Black Native people I have the honor to inform you that immediately on the receipt of your letter I wrote to those persons requesting their attendance at this office and it was no until the 22nd instant they made their appearance.

Mr Cameron came free to the Colony

P18   fourteen

Seven years ago and resides upon his farm near that of Captain Barclay and John Liddle rents a farm of James Hill at the back of Patersons Plains but has a partner to manage the farm in his absence. They request to be employed by Government for twelve months to have their prisoners well armed attached to them, and their whole party to be rationed and supplied with ammunition, at the expiration of the twelve months to receive five hundred acres of land each and a further renumeration of fifty pounds each should  their services be found useful and be certified as such by the Magistrates of the Districts in which they my be employed.

They are both strong young men and appear capable of enduring fatigue and I understand have a perfect knowledge of the eastern parts of the Country and are every way colutated??? For the proposed service I therefore respectfully submit my opinion thus they might in all probability  be successful employed in pursuit of Brady and other Bushrangers as well as of the Black Native people.

I have…..

PA Mulgrave JP

CF Police Magistrate

P19  fifteen

POL 15th Dec 1829

Dear Sir or Madam:

I am requested by the Police Magistrate to inform you that the complaint alledged against you by Mr Letter will be further investigated at this office at 10 o clock on Friday next when your attendance will be indispensibly necessary.

Signed JW P

Mr David Rolston

Police Office Launceston

1st Jany 1820

Sir,

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith Salary abstracts and requittance of pass for persons in this department together with a nominal list of persons entitled to salary for te present quarter and beg leave to inform you that a similar list was formed for the Police Office in Hobart Town three weeks ago and trust? Marks upon the enclosed list will distinctly shew the corrections necessary to be made before I can sign the abstracts.

Those documents would have been forwarded to you by return of post on last Monday had there not been an unusual press of Business at this office on that day as well as an inquest which lasted from ten in the morning until midnight and the office being insufficiently supplied with clerks.

I have….

PA Mone (Moore?) Esq

Muster Master

P20 sixteen

POL 1st Jan 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations against Moses Cochrane a convict charged with felony.

I have….

Algernon Montagu Esq

HM A General

Sent Captain Donaldson informations in the case of Weaver  accused of an unnatural crime to be returned to the office under cover  30 pages.  [i]

POL 4th Jany 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith the examination of Mr John Young touching the points required in your letter of the 24th ultimo and I regret that it is was entirely out of my power to forward it by last post.

I have…

P Mulgrave JP

POL 1st Jan 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith information against John Fuller a convict charged with stealing in a shop goods of the value of forty??? Shillings and upwards

I have….

Algernon Montagua eq

HM A Gl

P21 seventeen

POL 1st Jan 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith information against John Montgomery a convict charged with stealing an iron chain of the value of five shillings  the property of his master William Barnes Esquire.

I have….

Algernon Montague Esq

HM A Gl

POL 1st Jan 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to inform you that Constable William Henry Bird attached to this District per Coromandel? Holding a Vlained?? And Ticket of Leave was permitted to leave the Police this day and thus Henry Muirhead per Phoenix has been sworn in as Field Police Constable in his stead and request that should his appointment be approved he may be gazetted accordingly

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL 2nd Jan 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith a warrant for your assigned servant James Smith and to inform you that it has been reported here that three others of your assigned servants were present at the fight.

I have….

WG Walker Esq

P22 eighteen

Police Office Launceston 4thJany 1830

Sir,

With reference to your letter the 28th ultimo 9745/2  respecting my certificate upon this application of Mr James Hazlewood for a grant of land I have the honor to inform you that Mr Hazlewood purchased the assignment of the town allotment No 1 from Mr Frederick Champion upon which there was then no Buildings but a weatherboard House yet in an unfinished state has since been erected upon that allotment.

I have…

The honorable

John Burnett  Esq

POL 4 Jany 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith the memorial of Mr Allan McKinnon with the Certificate of the convicting Magistrate thereon

I have…..

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf Police Magistrate

P23  nineteen

Police Office Launceston 4th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to report for His Excellency’s information *on the events of 29th afternoon,  that having understood that a pitched battle was to be fought on the preceeding day somewhere near Norfolk Plains I dispatched Constables Thomas Johnson with several other Constables to ascertain the exact place * to apprehend any Runaways they might find and if they could ? was prevent this fight to report me the particulars from which it appears that George Green?/Elen? Glen? Who has recently arrived here from Sydney and John Williams who has been here some years residing in this District fought on the bank of the South Esk River * near Collins Public House for one hundred pounds on one side and seventy five pounds on the other that upwards of seven hundred persons were assembled and amongst them a great many assigned servants there were considerable sums of money with horses? And wattle? Have been fraudulently won and lost at this Battle for it is generally believed that much duplicity has been used by a few bad men upon the occasion and I humbly conceive that so large a number of disorderly persons assembling for such purposes might be attended with serious consequences and that the ? may? Required steps ought to be taken to prevent a recurrence of a disgraceful a? meeting

So soon as I had received

P24 twenty

The requested information I issued warrants for the apprehension of the pugilists as well as their seconds. Williams who was then under bail to keep the peace has not yet been apprehended and I regret to add that one of the constables who I had placed confidence in has been accused of betting at the fight which circumstance is now under investigation before Mr Barnes and Mr Kenworthy the result of which will be fully reported by next post.

PA Mulgrave Esq.

POL 9th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that Thomas Johnson per Caledonia holding a Ticket of Leave was dismissed from his office of Constable on the 5th inst. For having encouraged a prize fight by getting sums of money upon it and to request that Charles Stewart per The John Barry who formerly belonged to the New South Wales Veteran Company may be appointed in his stead.

P25 twenty one

POL 9th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith a coy of the Information of Thomas Cox and to inform you that other masters have refused to supply their assigned servants with necessary clothing food or money to enable them to travel to Hobart Town when Subpoenaed thither to attend the Supreme Court or Police Office and I beg to be instructed how far I may in future be justified in making requisitions upon the Commissariat? (convict and other?) departments for the maintenance or clothes of convicts under such circumstances.

[Lots of crossed out lines]

p26  twenty two

POL 11th Jany 1830

Sir

With reference to your ???? Of the 8th instant informing me that my application for Thomas Brennan to be employed as Clerk in this office has been forwarded to the Colonial Secretary I have the honor to request you will be pleased to remind that Gentleman of the expediency of immediately placing Thomas Brennan or some efficient clerk in this office Two of my clerks are now sick Henry Stephens two oaks??? Remaining? Prisoner’s Clerk is a very indifferent and slow penman

I have…

PA Mulgrave  Esq

Cf Police Magistrate

P27 twenty three

Police Office Launceston 11th jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to inform me by return of post to when the fees for cart licences should be paid viz whether this should go to the Crown or be considered as part of the instances of any person employed in the Department.

POL 11th Jany 1830

Sir

I beg leave  to remind you that I forwarded to your office on the 21st of last November a Requisition signed by the chief District Constable for seven muskets, twelve pair of handcuffs and cord? For oats? For the use of these Districts and as these articles are much required may I request you will have the goodness to inform me if the Requisition is likely to be acceded to.

I have….

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf Police Magistrate

POL 11th Jany 1830

Sir.

I have the honor to enclose herewith application of James Holman  together with an extract from the Records of this Office and request you will be pleased to inform me by return of post if you have any objection to her being liberated from the Gaol and restored to her husband.

I have….

J Gordon Esq

PM Richmond

P28  twenty four

POL 11th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to report that John Brown accompanied by Samuel Britton a man whose name is yet unknown robbed the house of Mr Archibald Thomson on the west bank of the Tamar, last night, they left the premises about two o clock this morning and taking with them Mr Thomson’s Horse and two of his assigned servants to carry their plunder.

It appears from the statement of one of Mr Thomson’s assigned servants which is the only account yet at hand of the transaction that seven men were at the Hut when there were four muskets some of them if not all were loaded about eight o clock in the evening when the bushrangers entered and secured the men and then proceeded to the house which it is believed they robbed of a great deal of property that Mr Thomson had left home abut four  o clock in the afternoon and gone down the Tamar in a Boat with two of this men that no violence was offered to any of his family or servants and that Brown and his companions appeared on familiar terms with some of Mr Thomson’s men.

As soon as this news Reached me I gave notice of it to the Police Magistrate of

P29  twenty five

Norfolk Plains as dispatched all disposable free with military parties furnished by Capt. Donaldson in pursuit of the Robbers.

POL 11th Jany 1830

Sir,

With reference to your circular of the 8th instant 9834 requiring  a return of Agriculture manufacture and populations in this district. I have the honor to inform you that it will be morally? Impossible that the required information can be accurately obtained and furnished by the 1st of February in as much as this office is insufficiently supplied with clerks the Division Constables are all men of little or no education and the Chief District Constable is now on his way to attend the Supreme Court at Hobart Town. I however will use every possible means in my power to prepare and furnish the required Return with as little delay as circumstances will a??? of.

I have the honor to be…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

P30  twenty six

POL 11th January 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that I have not one present form of permit in this office and as nearly 100 are as such weekly I request to be furnished by return of post with 1000 printed forms or of permits for the removal of s????? and as well as the forms of summonses promised in your letter above three weeks ago.

I have

WH? Mone? Esq.

POL 18th Jany 1830

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 8th instant requesting to be furnished with the police numbers of the persons mentioned in the margin I have the honor to annex the required particularly as far as they can be obtained and I regret that I have only one old Register of the Convicts in this Office which is in such a mutilated state that I cannot vouch for the weekly returns of offences being so accurate and complete as I could wish.

I have…

JM? Moore Esq

Muster Master

P31  twenty seven

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith the petition of H Stephens, Henry Helps, and JK Cunliffe Prisoners employed as Clerks in this office and as the prisoners constable now receive two shillings per Diem besides which they may obtain by fines I humbly conceive that the clerks ought to receive some additional pay or at least commutation? Money instead of their rations which they assure me are of very little value indeed.

I do not know how the Prisoner Clerks are paid and…???? Office and have m???? sent the enclosed petition to you in order that you may judge how far it would be proper to submit if to be considered of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor.

I have……

PA Mulgrave Esq

CF P Magistrate

P31  twenty eight

POL 18th Jan 1830

Sir,

In reply to your letter of  14th instant bearing reference to my letter of 11th respecting returns required by the Colonial Secretary by the 1st Feb where in you state that you cannot consider completion of the aid Return dependencies was upon a Register of Convicts or Black Books.  I beg leave to inform you that I fear some misunderstanding has taken place respecting my letters of last week I therefore taken the liberty to annex a copy of the only letters I wrote which was to the Colonial Secretary respecting returns.

POL18th Jan

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 14th inst respecting the need for cart licences and permits where in you state  that the accounts should be accompanied by an affadavit according to the annexed form I beg leave to inform you that your clerk has omitted for annex the forms/terms? Of the affadavits to your letters and as I am unacquainted with its I should feel obliged by

P32  twenty nine

Your furnishing it by the next messenger

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in duplicate attested account , fines and fees received by me as Police Magistrate during the Quarter ending this 31st December 1829.  You will perceive that these accounts contain fees for Permits and Carts Licences from the 12th of November the days on which I took charge of this Office and the same received under those heads? From the commencement of the Quarter up to that time were collected by my Predecessaor James Gordon Esq who I believe paid them to the Treasurer as he arrived at Hobart Town.

I regret? That those accounts have lain over so long, but it was necessary that the accounts of fines should be examined at a Quarter or General Sessions to award the same paid in the informers ? has occasioned some delays.

I have the honor to be

Sir

WG Boyes Esq

Papers of those accounts see Memorandum Book

P33  thirty

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations against Edward Sweeney charged with “murder”. I have the honor to be …..

Algernon Montagu Esq

HM Attorney General

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith information against Richard Waters charged with “Receiving a stolen watch”

I have the honor to be …..

Algernon Montagu Esq

HM Attorney General

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith infomrations against David Rolston with maliciously firing at and wounding  a Bull  – Mr Rolston has been admitted to bail.

I have the honor to be …..

Algernon Montagu Esq

HM Attorney General

POL 25th jany 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations against George Wardham /Woodham charged with felony

I have the honor to be …..

Algernon Montagu Esq

HM Attorney General

P34 thirty one

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir,

I have the honour to enclose herewith a letter from Mr John Daniels tending his Resignation as keeper of the pound at Launceston and also the petition of Mr George Pyle praying to be appointed in Mr Daniel’s stead which petition I beg leave to recommend to the favourable consideration of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor

I have the honor to be …..

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf Police Magistrate

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 22nd instant requesting to be furnished with the particulars respecting the person ingation? In the mangle? I have the honor to inform you that it appears from the Register in our Office as well as the Certificate of Freedom which has recently been delivered to Thomas Pearce per Albion that his Police Number is 311 I therefore suspect that the number offered by Thomas Purser per Albion is incorrect.

I have….

JM? Moore Esq

P35 thirty two

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith five bonds as requested in your memorandum of the 8th inst. And I beg to observe that one of them is drawn up in the name of John Rowley which it appears from the mans signature and statement should have been James Rowley.

I have….

Edward Boyd Esq

Deputy Surveyor General

POL 25th jany 1830

Sir,

I beg leave to remind you that the salary abstracts of the last Quarter have not yet arrived for my signature and that I forwarded to your office on the 1st instant a list of persons of this department entitled to salary up to the 31st ultimo.

I have…

JW? Moore Esq.

POL 25th Jany 1830

Sir,

With reference to your letters of the 18th inst. 9834/3 respecting the returns of agricultural manufacture and population

I have the honor to inform you this women? Watch? On the? Receipt of gin? Circular of the 8th inst.??

I directed

P36 thirty three

papers to be ruled and handed and forwarded with letters from the office to Division Constables in this District required their immediate attention to the matter. Some of those lists have been returned to this office exceedingly incorrect as many of the Farms omitted pretending that they do not know the brands?  of their respective divisions and as Mr Welsh the Chief District Constable has not yet returned ???? to me?? And the great want of clerks in this office I fear it will be  this day fortnight before the Regional Information returns  can be obtained and forwarded to your office.

I have….

The Honorable John Burnett Esq

POL  1st Feb 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in triplicate monthly abstract allowances to Field Police and Petty Constables in the districts to be countersigned by you. Which I understand from Mr DUGB Hull is absolutely necessary and request you will e pleased to return them to this office by the next messenger I also learn from Mr Hull that he has not yet received any instructions or warrant to pay the constables allowance…

P37 thirty four

And as most of them have need of their pays as soon as it is due perhaps you will deem it requisite to cause the necessary instance??? to be forwarded to Mr Hull by next post that the men may receive their money as early as possible.

JH Moore Esq

POL 1st Feb 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex Return of Offence recorded at this office against Thomas Williams 634 per Lady Earl as required in your letter of the 29th ultimo.

I have….

JW Moore Esq.

Police Office Launceston 8th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose here with dupicate returns of fees received by the chief clerk at this office during the last  two quarters as per the fee Book kept at this office

I have…

WG Boyes Esq

P38 thirty five

POL 6 Feb 1830  [purple pencil X]

Returns of fees received by persons employed in the Police Departments in Launceston and authorized to be appropriated as part of the Enoluments? of Office during the Quarter ending the 3rd of Sept 1829.

Joseph William Bell Chief Clerk

Information Oaths Warrants

Summonses & recognizances  13…13

John Dell acting Chief Constable

Serving Warrants and summonses  3.. 15..0

Sigd W Lyttleton                                     17…8…0

POL 6 Feb 1830

Return of fees received by persons employed in the Police Department at Laucneston and authorized to be appropriated as part of the emoluments? F Office during the quarter ending the 31st December 1829

Joseph William Bell Chief Constable

Informations oaths warrants

Summonses and recognizances    15…13…6

John Dell acting Chief Constable from the commencemences?

Of the quarter to the 18th Oct 1829

Serving summonses and warrants   7….6

PW Welsh Chief Constable

From the 19th Oct 1829 to his termination

Of the quarter       3..15..6

£20…6…6

P39 thirty six

Police Office Launceston 8th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in duplicate unfixed contingences abstracts for the quarter ending the 31st December 1829

?????

JH Moore Esq

Muster Master for abstracts see memo book

8th Feby 1830

I have the honor to enclose herewith Descriptions of Thomas Brown 792 as requested in your letter of the 28th Jany

I have…

JW Moore Esq

POL  8th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith the letter of Mr W Patten together with his statement and that of Mr William Kneale stating? Thereto.

I have….

PW Mulgrave

Cf Police Magistrate

POL   8th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that Joseph Bass per Woodford was sworn in as a Petty Constable attached to this department on the 3rd Novr last * as appears in a letter of that date and that he has and subsequently gazetted as a Constable of George Town and there being no Police Establishment in that Township, Bass has since been ??????  continued to act

P39

thirty seven

As  a constable at Launceston and his name was included in the par? List for the last month which  are on this day returned by the muster master as incorrect in consequence of Basses name being included I beg therefore to be instructed where and how Bass it to be employed and from which department he is to be paid.

I have

Cf P Magistrate

POL  8th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Return of Agriculture Manufacture and Population in the Police District of Launceston which includes George Town as furnished at this Office by the Chief Constable and Divisions Constables

I have…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

Forwarded Mr Dell’s letter to the cf P Magistrate requiring twenty pounds for cart hire.

POL  15th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith examinations taken against John Davis  convict charged with Felony.

I have

A Montagu Esq

P40

Thirty eight

POL 15 Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith examinations taken against John Kelly a convict charged with Felony

I have…

Algernon Montagu Esq

POL 15th Feby 1830

Sir

Happening that Joseph Bass per Woodford who was sworn in as a Petty Constable attached to the Police Department at Launceston has been gazetted as a Constable at George Town which I conceived was a mistake in the printing and therefore employed him in Launceston, and on my late visit to George Town I discovered there two constables are already placed there with very little duty to perform and as Bass continues to be use fully employed at Launceston I have the honor to request that he may be gazetted as a Constable attached to the Police at Launceston as requested in my Letter of the 30th of Novr 1829.

I have…

P41

Thirty nine

POL 15th Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that the abstracts for salaries due to persons in this Department up to the 31st of December last have not yet been forwarded to Launceston and that the monthly abstracts allowances to Field Police and Petty Constables in this District have not yet been received, and as the Constables complain bitterly of the inconvenience they experience for want of their pay I pray you to have the goodness to cause the necessary documents to be forwarded with the least possible delay.

I have the honor to be…

JW Moore Esq

POL 22nd Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex copy f offences recorded at this office against the convicts named in the margin and it appears on examining the records the whole of the offences except the last one should have been posted into the black book against Thomas Williams per Lady East? Who was tried in London and whose number on our Register is 631…

P42

Forty

As no 634 has been erroneously posted into the black book against some of the offences it is therefore probable my Return of Offences recorded against Thomas Williams 634 on the 1st instant is incorrect.

JW Moore

Muster Master

POL 22nd Feby 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith the Description of William Stevens 112 which would have been forwarded sooner but them poor man has been confined to his bed in the hospital from sickness.

I have…

JH Moore Esq JP

POL 22nd Feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith abstracts and acquaintance of pay for twenty nine persons employed as constables at Launceston from the 1st to the 31st Jany last.

I have to request you would be pleased to furnish this office with some printed forms of abstracts for the monthly pay of the constables.

I have….

PA Mulgrave

P43

Forty one

POL 22nd feby 1830

Sir

I beg leave to acquaint you that the abstracts for salaries due to persons in the departments up to the end f the last quarter have now been forwarded to Launceston for payment and a the monthly pay of the constables has not been paid since that time, they complain badly of the inconvenience they experience in consequence of the delay I have written twice to Mr Moore upon the subject and I trust you will have the goodness to cause the abstracts to be forwarded with as little delay as possible as I conceive the keeping the Constables out of their pay to be fraught with mischief as well as inconvenience.

I have

PA Mulgrave Esq JP

P44

Forty two

POL 22nd feby 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform  you that I have not one printed form of a permit summary for principals and summons for witness, in the office and request you will be pleased to supply those forms at your very earliest convenience.

I have…

JA Moore Esq

POL 1st March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith examination taken against John Cairns and Bernard Cosgrove charged with Felony and in consequence of the great contradiction in the evidence and the character of Mary Barrett being indifferent Cairns and Cosgrove they have been held to bail

I have…

TC Simpson

Attorney General

POL 1st March 1830

Sir

In reply to your letter of the 18th ultimo enclosing a letter from Mr Gordon * returned herewith respecting Mr Dell’s charge for carting Mr Gordon’s baggage from Hobart Town to Launceston I have the honor to enclose the statement of Mr Dell in support of his demand and who assures me that if….

P45

Forty three

Mr Gordon

Mr Gordon had not compelled his man to bring his baggage to Launceston the cartage of the Goods he had agreed to take would  have amounted to ten  pounds and upwards and that he is willing to reduce his charge.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf P Magistrate

POL 1st March 1830

Sir

I have he honor to enclose herewith Examinations taken against George Proctor charged with Bullock stealing who with the advice of another Magistrate has been admitted to bail.

I have…

Algernon Montagu Esq

POL 1st March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith nominal list of Persons employed in the Police Department in the District of Launceston during the month of February last as required by your Circular of the 16th ultimo.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

P46

Forty four

POL 1st March 1830

Sir

I have the Honor to enclose herewith abstracts and acquittances of pay for twenty eight persons employed as Constables in the Police District of Launceston from the 1st to 28th of February 1828

I have

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL 1st March 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to request you will have the goodness to furnish me by return of Post with a full description of James Marriott no 394 per Morley a person answering the Description of Marriott as given in the Gazette being now in custody charged with being a Runaway, but who asserts his name is Thomas Wright and that he came free per Cumberland.

I have….

JW Moore Esquire JP

Muster Master

P47

Forty five

POL 8th March 1830

Sir,

With reference to you letter of the 18th ultimo stating that Joseph Bass per Woodford may be transferred from the Strength of the Constabulary at George Town to Launceston and that it is not necessary such transfer should be notified in the Gazette I beg leave to request your attention to the annex copy of part of a letter from the muster master respecting Bass’s pay and as Bass has been included in the Commutation Lists for Launceston up to the 31st December last which being my signatures and he has also been returned by me in the nominal list of Constables at Launceston were he has been actually serving since his appointment to the constabulary I cannot with propriety sign the abstracts for his pay as a Constable at George Town which it appears from the terms? Of Mr Moore’s letter I must continue to do every month so long as he may be employed as a Constable and his appointment in the Gazette remains unaltered, I therefore trust you will see the necessity of causing Bass to be gazetted as a Constable at Launceston from the date of his appointment * or direct some other communication to be made upon the subject to authorize the auditor of accounts to pass the required abstracts that Bass may receive his daily pay…

P48

Forty six

From the 1st of January and also the salary due to him from the 16th Decr 1829 (the date of his appointment) to the 31st of this month – neither of which he has been able to obtain in consequence of his having been gazetted as a Constable at George Town instead of Launceston

I have the honor to be…

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf P Magistrate

POL 8th March 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to transmit copy of the application of Margaret Killjoy? For her Certificate of Freedom on the Reverse together with the annexed description of her person, and should the applicant’s term of transportation be expired, I request you will be pleased to ford her Certificate of Freedom to this Office for Delivery.

I have…

The Principal Superintendent of Convicts

Sydney

P49

Forty seven

Police Office Launceston

8th March 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 11th December 1829 respecting the removal of John McCale to Sydney and stating that His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor had been pleased to direct it would be desirable that he be placed under the charge of the Master of the Vessel I have the honor to inform you that I have applied to the Commanders of two vessels which have left this port for Sydney since the receipt of your letter and also to the Master of the Surry? Now loading for Sydney, to take McCale thither to Sydney and they have all refused to do so unless an officer is sent with him and both their passé money paid McCabe consequently continues in the Gaol at Launceston I there fore request to be further instructed what steps are to be taken to convey him to Sydney.

PA Mulgrave Esq

P50

Forty eight
POL 8th March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith abstract of General Salary due to Constable Joseph Bass up to the 31st December 1829 which was omitted in the abstracts for that quarter also abstracts of daily pay due to the said Joseph Bass and Henry Muirhead up to the 31st January 1830 which were also omitted in the monthly abstracts for likewise monthly abstracts of pay due to the whole of the petty constables and field police at Launceston from the 1st to the 28th of February 1830 and I request you will be pleased to cause these abstracts  to be copied upon the requisite printed forms and forwarded in due course.

I have the honor…..

[purple pencil X]

PA Mulgrave

1st Bass from the 13th to 31st Decr  £10  8..9..

2nd Bass from 1st to 31st Jany @ 2/ per diem

Muirhead from 13th to 31st Jany @ 2/ per diem   £5…0.00

3rd 29 men from 1st to 28 Feby  79..16..0

P51

Forty nine

POL 8th March 1830

Sir

I have the Honor to annex list of Books and stationery required at this office as it may be some time an opportunity may offer of sending the whole of the articles to Launceston I request that a few forms of summonses, licences for Dogs, Slaughtering cattle and per mils?/milk?/nils?  Be sent by return of Post.

I have…

P Mulgrave Esq

List of Books and stationary required at the Police Office Launceston on the 18th March 1830

One large book as Register of male convicts

The do do as a Register of female do

One large book for registering offences

Four smaller for registering of licences of dogs, slaughtering cattle, and other purposes.

1000 best quills – the last? Quills supplied the office were so inferior as to be almost useless

2 reams best foolscap paper one ream of post Do

½ ream blotting paper ½ ream large paper for covers of letters

1000 printed forms of permits for removals of windspins??

300 printed forms of Summary for Principal

500 printed forms of Do for witnesses

200 printed form of warrants in apprehended * 200 punishment warrants

2000 printed forms of passes for convicts  sorted

from Jakslaw??

3 dozen black lead pencils

two rulers

three bottle of Indian rubbers

one dozen black and red in powders

two wafer stamps

P52

Fifty

POL 15th March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith the statements of Mr RK Ayton  as requested in your letter of the 5th inst.

I have..

Charles Arthur Esquire

POL 15th March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in triplicate salary abstracts and supplementary Salary abstracts of pay for persons in the Police Department at Launceston for the quarter ending the 31st instant you will perceive that William Brea  is as written in the abstract from your office should have been Thomas Brennan I should have furnished these abstracts upon print forms but as those received from your office have all got damaged none could be procured in Launceston I have been obliged to cause them to be written.

I was not aware that it was absolutely necessary for me to furnish the salary abstracts in triplicate as those for last quarter were signed by the chief police Magistrate and not by me but made out from a less? Furnished form ?  this office

JH Moore Esq

P53

Fifty one

POL 22nd March 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith   examinations taken against John Gunning a convict charged with felony.

I have the honor…

The attorney general

POL 18th March 1830

Madam,

From a communication received by last post from the Attorney General respecting a prisoner named Davis charged with stealing a pair of Ear Rings the property of Mr Allan I am under the painful necessity of requesting Miss M Alan to give further evidence in the case and shall feel obliged by her attendance at this office during the forenoon of tomorrow or the day after as may be most convenient.

I am aware that Mr Allan is from home otherwise this Letter would (as a matter of course) been addressed to him.

I have the honor to be

Madam

Your obliging…

Mrs Allan

Tamar

P54

Fifty two

Police office Launceston

22nd March 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in duplicate Requisitions for Books and Stationery required at this office and as you will perceive that I am deficient of most of the articles I trust they will be forwarded at an early convenience.

I have the honor…

PA Mulgrave Esquire

Cf P Magistrate

POL 22nd March 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 12th instant respecting the case against John Davis I have the honor to enclose herewith the further information of Miss Allan and to inform you

[??]

P55

Fifty three

POL 22nd March 1830

Sir

With reference to your circular of the 9th instant requesting my opinion as to that fees ought to be paid for the various services performed by Clerks and Constables in Cases of breach of the peace misdemeanours or infurtherance of any other Magisterial duties (accompanied by a list of fees now taken at the Police Office in Hobart Town) I have the honor to submit the annual schedule of fees which I consider fair and reasonable.

I disapprove of any fee whatsoever being charged in cases of felony and have therefore omitted the fee of 6/8 for a warrant for felony.

As the payment of the fees arising from complaints of Breach of the Peace are in most cases the chief and in some the sole punishment of the offence I think they ought not to be reduced.

The information and complaint ought most certainly to be charged, as well as one shilling for every folio of 72? Works in proceedings for it sometimes happen that illicit venders of spirits or other offenders will cause much trouble and writing for examining a hot of witnesses which are generally at hand to endeavour to quash an information that has been founded on truth.

I also  conceive that a formal conviction

P56

Fifty four

Ought in cases of illicit grog selling harbouring runaway convicts &c to be drawn up and pled in the office for which a fee should be allowed, and that warrants of Districts as well as those for the apprehension and committing to Gaol offenders who refuse to pay a fine levied by virtue of an act in Council should be charged for although the act “to regulate summary proceedings before Justices of the Peace” empowers the Magistrates to assess reasonable casts in such cases, yet many of the Justices may be scrupulous of allowing any item which does not appear in the scale of fees, and the clerk would be enabled to furnish a Bik? Of particulars  to the Magistrates, the Plaintiffs, or Defendant if required.

In cases where Constables or other persons lodge information and sue for a pecuniary fine the fee I conceive should be paid by the Plaintiff if he fails to prove his information, and such a measure would tend to prevent very frivolous complaints and would also check bribery in case of a more flagrant nature and induce the Plaintiff to exert himself in proving sufficient evidence to prove the charge.

Should the fees at present received

P57

Fifty five

By the Chief District Constable at Launceston be collected and paid over to the Colonial Government he would require  considerable additional salary if on the other hand he should be allowed to continue to receive fee I am of opinion tat ought not to undergo any alteration.

I have….

POL 22 March 1830

Sir

With reference to your Circular of the 17th ultimo stating that His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor had been pleased to determine that it will be necessary to advance to the Police magistrates every month to the pay of the Constables in the respective Districts to enable them to pay them weekly I have the honor to inform you that all the constables in this District are now in arrear of seven weeks pay and as I conceive much evil may arise from keeping such men our of their pay I trust that some steps will soon be taken to pay them regularly every week for it is obvious that many of them have no means of supporting themselves and are obliged to solicit credit from the Dealers and there are reason to believe that some of them are in the habit of borrowing money at immense interests and that others when they receive

P58

Fifty six

Two or three months pay at a time are very likely to resort to public and gambling houses abuses which would be checked by paying them every week for it cannot be supposed that men of their class when receiving three months pay at  time amounting to nine or ten pounds can resist the temptation held out at Launceston to drinking and other disorderly habits to which convicts are so universally prone. I therefore trust you will perceive the expediency of directing such means to be adopted as may enable the constables in this District to be paid weekly as directed by his Excellency the Lieutenant Governor

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf P Magistrate

PO Launceston 22 March 1830

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose herewith he further information of Mr Thomas Landale respecting the cause of the death of Mary Sweeney as requested in your letter of the 12th instant.

I have the honor…

Algernon Montagu Esq

His Majesty’s Attorney General

P59

Fifty seven

Police Office Launceston 22nd Jan 1830

I have the honor to enclose herewith a warrant for the apprehension of John McCabe together with a certificate of Freedom found upon his person when he was apprehended by Andrew Rhind in Novr last.

McCabe will leave this for Hobart Town tomorrow morning with two other prisoners under an escort of three constables who will forward them to the next Police station from whence they will be conveyed on the road to Hobart Town.

I have…

PA Mulgrave

Chief Police Magistrate

P:O:L 22nd March 1830

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith the petition of Henry Stephens and beg leave to observe that is appears by a letter of the 19th ultimo that my Certificate on the reverse of Stephen’s petition must have escaped your notice.

I have…

To RH Woods Esq JP

P60

Fifty eight

POL 29th March 1830

Sir

In reply to your letter of the 22nd inst requesting the particulars in the case of William Lawrence now in Launceston Gaol to be forwarded to your office, I have the honor to inform  you that no person of that name has been sentenced at this office to be removed to a penal settlement and that I know nothing of his case.

I have…

Dudley Fereday Esq

Sheriff

POL 29th oct 1830

Sie

In obedience to your instructions of the 12th instant of the case named in the margin Rex v John Davis I have the honor to enclose herewith the further examinations of Miss Allan together with those of Samuel Harvey? Brown and both Mr Charlton and Mr Munro upon being questioned appear to be unable to give any evidence in the case. Those examinations would have been forwarded to you sooner but Brown who had been ordered by my clerk to attend the office on the morning of the 19th the day I was expected to return from George Town where I had been called to hold an inquest…

P61

Fifty nine

Did not make his appearance before last  Saturday neither could he be found in the meantime by any of the Constables.

I have the honor

Algernon Montagu esq

POL 29th March 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 26 March 1830 stating that the monthly abstracts from Jan to Feby were duly forwarded to the proper authorities and that? Your signature is withheld from the quarterly salary abstracts on occasion of Thomas Brennan being inserted therein I have the honor to inform you that the abstracts for Feby have not yet been forwarded to Launceston for payment and consequently the constable who ????? have now two months pays due to them and that Henry Muirhead and Joseph Bass have not received any pay since their appointment why Bass should have been gazetted as a constable at George Town I know not as the mistake ought to have been long ago rectified that they man might have received his pay with respect to Thomas Brennan he was appointed/? By a letter from Col? Sec? Office

[end?]

P62

Sixty

Police Office 27 March

Sir

In reference to your letter of the 22 inst wherein you state that you are under the necessity of again calling my attention to the case of William Laurence under sentence? To a Penal Settlement – and ???? “you will furnish me by return of post all that is required in the case above alluded to” –

I beg leave to inform you that Committing Magistrate  [end?]

I have the honor to be

Dudley Fereday  Esq

[from end? Above?]

On the 12th feby? To be employed as a clerk in the office a consequence of an application I had made through the Chief Police Magistrate and as two other Prisoner Clerks receive 1/- per day for teir services I conceived Brennan was entitled to the same and if it required to be gazetted it surely ought to have been done so soon as he was placed in the office.

on the 8th instant I forwarded to the Chief Police Magistrate abstracts of Quarter Pays due to Joseph Bass from the 13th to the 31st Dec and abstracts of  ???Months? pay from

p63

Sixty one

?? ?? 1st to 31st Jany and also abstracts of monthly pay due to Henry Muirhead from the 13th to 31st Decr neither of which have yet been forwarded for payments and the men are actually in distress in consequence of the delay.

I have forwarded ?? ???  ????    ?????  ?????? the abstracts of pay due to the constables for the ???? of March  In? the Chief Police Magistrate to whom it appears they are ????? to be ????? and  ???? steps will be immediately taken to secure regular weekly payments of mines due to the constables employed in? this District as directed by His Excellency the Lieut. Gov.

JW Moore Esq

Muster Master

Wrote to Mr Moore for a few? Licences for Dogs as required by the acts in ???????

POL 29th March 1830

Sir

His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor may be pleased to place Thomas Brennan as a Clerk in the? Office in consequence of Application I have made through the cf P Magistrate and Brennan has been employed since the 16th Feby?  I conceived he was to receive the pay of one shilling per diem allowed

p64

Sixty two

To the other prisoner clerks at? This? Office and already inserted his name into quarterly salary abstracts to which the muster master has withheld his signature in consequence may I therefore request to be informed whether His Excellency is pleased to allow Thomas Brennan to receive the same salary as the other Prisoner Clerks employed in this office and if so that some specific authority may be given for ?????   I have order that the salary abstracts may require two required signatures.

I have the honor

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

POL  5th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Returns of person employed in this Department unto? 31st ultimo shewing where they are respectively stationed.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

p65

Sixty three

5 April 1830

Sir

In reply to your letter of the 1st instant respecting a complaint made by the sheriff that the orders relative? To the ???????ion of the informations to that Officer respecting men under sentence to a formal settlement are frequently neglected.

I have the honor to state only one instance  has yet occurred since my succession? to the office of Police Magistrate when a prisoner was sentenced to a Penal Settlement and on that occasion the notice? Was forwarded by the ensuing? post to the Sheriff.

I beg leave to add an uncorrection that strong? Letter was addressed to me lately by that Officer respecting William Laurence when He ought more properly to have directed himself to the Police Magistrate of Norfolk Plains, he being the Committing Magistrate.

I have…

The Honorable John Burnett Esq.

P66

Sixty four

POL 7 April 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 2nd instant respecting four convicts supposed to have absconded from Macquarie Harbour I have the honor to annex their names and description together with that of William Throssell who was apprehended here a few days ago.

As it would be quite impossible for me to complete the case against those men at Launceston I have directed them to be forwarded to your office under an escort consisting of two soldiers and three constables who are to be relieved at Campbell Town as the prisoners conveyed from thence under the direction of the Police Magistrate there – I conceived it proper to furnish you with a Description of the prisoners as it is possible some of them say effect their escape on the Road.

I have  &

PA Mulgrave Esq.

P67

Sixty five

Police Office Launceston 12th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex the examination of Josiah Hickings the conduct of Constable George Moffatt who appears to have been guilty of a dereliction of duty and quite unfit to be entrusted with the care of prisoners.

Moffatt arrived here on Friday morning he had been induced to take the handcuffs off Hickings at Mr Gibsons barn and there he had effected his escape during the night

I have …

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf Police Magistrate

POL 12th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to furnish me by return of Post with a few printed summonses of each sort. I made a formal Requisition for summons ???? t??? forms about a fortnight ago and r Moore had promised P???s of a month ago to send me some summonds by the post which has not yet been received.

J Spode Esq

P68

Sixty six

POL 10th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you that the person named in the margin was convicted on Saturday last before a Bench of Magistrates at this office of Neglect of Duty in taking two prisoners under his charge to a Public House getting drunk and escaping from the Watch House  our sentence to be dismissed from his office of Constable and forwarded to work twelve month in irons on the Streets of Launceston.

I have..

ML Smith

PM

Norfolk Plains

12 April 1830

Sir

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 8th inst.

I have previously been addressed on two occasions in/on the lulyict? Aluded to in your letter. When those applications ought to have been made to the Committing Magistrate no instance having…

P69

Sixty seven

Yet occurred of my having convicted any offender to a Penal Settlement in the case? William Lawrence the prisoner mentioned in  your former letter the man was convicted by the Police Magistrate at Norfolk Plains. In reply to your letter of the 8th inst.? I beg to observe that no Prisoner has on any occasion been committed to jail by me unaccompanied with a formal and legal warrant and I have further to observe that unless your correspondence with me is conducted with a little more courtesy, I shall be under the necessity of submitting your letter to the perusal of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governnor

I have the Honor

POL

Forwarded to A.C.G.L. return of office furniture and stores.

Forwarded to the Colonial Secretary the memorial of Timothy Quin James Houghton for a vendor licence the

P70

Sixty eight

Memorial of John Dunlop the letter? Of Richard Jordan to the Colonial Sec.

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Duplicate returns of fees received by persons employed in this Police Depertment at Launceston and authorized to be appropriated as p??r of the Enoluents? Of Office during the quarter ending the 31st march 1830.

GW Boyes Esq

Auditor of Accounts

See acct Book (in red pen)

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Return of Fees received at the Office for Tickets of Leave free and conditional pardons from the last? November to the 31st March 1830 together with a Draft upon to Derwent? Book for the amount (£3.13.60

I have…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

X see account Book (in red)

P71

Sixty nine

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith the Ticket of Leave of the Persons named in the margin who have become free, the two first have never been issued from this office consequently no fee has been received for them, I also enclose the Ticket of Leave of Thomas Johnson nr [blank] who has been deprived of it by command of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor.

I have

To?

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

I  have the honor to inform you the Field Police Constable William Hardister? (326) who has recently obtained a Ticket of Leave has requested to resign, should his request be complied with, I beg leave to recommend John Thomson (free) formerly a Private in the veterans corps as a fit person to be employed in the Police in Hardisty’s? stead.

I have the honor to be

PA Mulgrave Esq

P72

Seventy

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in duplicate unfixed contingents? Abstracts for the quarter ending the 31st March 1830 and I beg leave to inform you that several of the Constables have complained of the non payment of Rewards due to them for apprehension of runaway convicts nearly twelve months ago.

I have

P Mulgrave Esq

X see account Book

POL 19th March [should be April?] 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith (In duplicate) attested account of fines and fees received by me as Police Magistrate during the quarter ending the 31st March 1830

I have…

GW Boyes esq

X see account Book

POL 19th April 1830

Sir

With reference to the letter of Mr Theodore Bartley returned herewith. I have the honor to state that James Jones was accidentally drowned on the night of the 14th Feby last and that his place has been supplied??? by one of the Police constables – as Jones was exclusively employed under the orders of

P73

Seventy one

The Comptroller of Customs I supposed this gentleman would have reported his death immediately and that another person would have been appointed in his stead. I regret that I know of no prisoner in the public works here sufficiently qualified and trustworthy to be appointed a Constable upon the Wharf in lieu of the deceased as the situation appears to me to require a sober active and intelligent person

I have…

Colonial Secretary

POL 20th April 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 16th instant requesting further particulars relative to the misconduct  of Special Constable George Moffatt I have the honor the enclose the Examination of William Allgood from which it appears that Moffatt had not only neglected to secure his prisoners at night but held out an inducement to them to abscond for Hicking after his statement had been taken add that Moffatt had told the prisoners if they runaway again and came to Hobart Town to give themselves up and he would give them money for so doing – Moffatt stated he had been induced to take the Handcuffs off Hicking

P74

Seventy two

At Gibson’s Barn in consequence of his wrist being much swelled which appears to have been a willful falsehood

I have..

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL 26th Apri 1830

Sir

I have the Honor to enclose herewith informations against  Thomas Massey for an assault.

I have the honor to

A Montagu Esq

HM Attorney Genl

POL 26th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith nominal return of Persons employed in the Police of Launceston during the present month as required by your circular of the 26th Feby 1830.

I have

Cf P Magistrate

P75

Seventy three

POL 26th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith a abstract of pays due to the Field Police Petty Constables from the 1st to the 30th instant

Cf P Magistrate

X see acct book

POL 26th April 1830

Sir I have the honor to enclose herewith in triplicate abstracts of pays due to the field Police and Petty Constables from the 1st to the 31st May ensuing as required by your circular of the 26th Feby intant.

Cf P Magistrate

X see acct book

POL 26th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request Angus Kennedy No 55 per Lord Melville may be appointed a constable to be stationed at the Wharf at Launceston vice james Jones Deceased.

I have…

Cf P Magistrate.

Not sent

POL 26th April 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request that John McDonald Per ASIA an assigned servant to Roderick Mc Donald may be appointed to the Field Police attached to the District he having been…

P76

Seventy four

Been strongly recommended for the service by his master Mr Welsh the Chief District Constable.

I have…

Cf P Magistrate

POL  3rd May 1830

Sir

With reference to your memorandum of the 27th ultimo pointing out an omission in the Return of application for certificates of Freedom and Tickets of Leave I have the honor to inform you that James Cavanagh per Minerva intends residing with his brother John Cavanagh who rents a farm of W Scot/Leake?  At the Cocked Hat Hill

The Honorable

James Burnett Esq

POL 3rd May 1830

I have the honor to enclose herewith supplementary abstracts of pays due to the constables in this District for two months of April and May 1830

I have the…

PA Mulgrave esq

P77

Seventy five

POL 10th Mary 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will have the goodness to forward by the next post or an early convenience a few/ream? Of each of the forms mentioned in the margin. I have made a formal Requisition of these Forms with other which may yet be some time before they can be sent? Road by? Water.

I have

J Spode Esq

[margin] permits passes sorted summonses warrants to apprehend

POL 17th My 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations taken at this office against Richard Lowe and Henry Thomson charged with felony.

I have…

Algernon Montagu Esq

Not to be sent the attorney general expected in Launceston on the 19th instant.

POL 17th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations taken against Thomas Rores/Raves/Roses? Charged with Felony.

I have….

A Montagu  esq.

Memo: Not to be sent the attorney general expected in Launceston on the 19th instant.

P78

Seventy six

POL 17th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor toe enclose herewith the informations taken against Patrick Welsh charged with Felony.

I have..

A Montagu Esq

Memo: Not to be sent the attorney general expected in Launceston on the 19th instant.

POL 17th May 1830

Sir

With reference to your letter of the 14th instant respecting the Rewards for the apprehension of Thomas Raves 443 I have the honor to inform you that Raves was fully committed at this office on the 14th instant for a Robbery committed by him in company with the Bushrangers Bevan and Britton.

I have…

Isiah Spode JP

Muster Master

POL 24th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex List of Applicants at the office for Certificates of Freedom and Tickets of Leave whose Description have been regularly forwarded but the required Documents have not yet been received at this office.

RH Woods Esqr

PL of Convicts

I have….

See acct book folio 10

P79

Seventy seven

Police Office Launceston 24th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith Lists of Runaway convicts who have been brought to this office for the apprehension of whom no rewards have been paid and I should fee obliged if you would be pleased to cause the Rewards of those who appear to be due to be put into a train for payment.

I have…

Josiah Spode JP

(see account book folio 12)

[margin]: two lists one for quarter ending 30th Sept 1829  the other for decr 1829.

X [purple pencil]

I have the honor to enclose herewith the statement of John Rosevear respecting the capture of two native Boys who were brought to this Town in a Whale Boat belonging to Mr Thomas last night. One of the Boys appears to be about fifteen years of age and the other twelve they have been supplied each with a suit of woollen slop clothing by Mr Rosevear neither of them can speak a word of English John Rosevears states that his Father is desirous of keeping the youngest boy they are at….

P80

Seventy eight

Present confined in the prison Barracks here until His Excellency’s pleasure shall be known.

X [purple pencil]

POL 24th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith the statement of Arthur Maynes and John Rosevear touching the apprehension of some black native people who are now in the prisoners Barracks in Launceston.

You will perceive when Maynes made his statement at this office the women and Boy therein mentioned were at George Town on their arrival here on the following day they were recognized as part of the five women who were sent here from Hobart Town in April last and who were subsequently set at liberty by Mr Batman, these women complain that Maynes and his companion destroyed their dogs and took away their passes, pipes and tobacco, as Maynes left Launceston for Hobart Town on the day he gave his statement I have not been able to question him further respecting the matter, he however I believe intends to call upon the Aboriginal Committee

P81

Seventy nine

With the view of receiving the supposed rewards for the apprehension of the women and child.

Mr Rosevear states his father requests he may be permitted to keep the youngest of the two youths.

I have…

The Honorable

John Burnett Esq

POL 24th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith a packet of informations and other papers necessary to the prosecution of several persons committed by James Gordon Esquire which I received by this day past from that Gentleman.

I have…

P82

Eighty

POL 24th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith in triplicate supplementary salary abstracts of pay for the constable from the 1st to the 31st June next and I beg leave to observe that al the petty and field police constables in the District have now eight weeks pay due to them.

I have

PA Mulgrave Esq

POL

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith informaitons against Thomas Raves? Charged with felony.

I have the honor to be

A Montagu Esquire

His Majestys Attorney General

P83

POL 26th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith extracts from the Records of this Office in the case of  Rex v John Gilshein together with a Recognizance for his appearance before the Court to answer the charge

I have…

POL 27th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith informations taken by Mr Gordon in the case of Rex versus Thomas Templeton together with the examinations of Richard White and Sarah Clayton touching the case which have been taken by me I the Jail this morning.

I have the honor…

27th May 1830

Sent the Attorney General the further information of William Barnes in the case of Rex v Laughlin White and others

P84

POL 27th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed here with information in the case of Rex versus John Morton and others together with the further information of Mr Robert Pringle Stuart touching the matter.

I have…

Attorney General

POL 28th May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to return enclosed herewith information in the case of Rex v Cantwell and another with the further information of James Burton touching the case.

I have

Algernon Montagu Esquire

POL 28th may 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith the further information of Robert Thomas in the case of Rex versus Laughlin White and others

I have…

Attorney General

P85

POL 31st May 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex copy of a letter received last week from the Colonial Secretary and to enclose herewith a duplicate copy of the Returns therein referred to which upon reference to your letter Book I have no doubt you will find were regularly forwarded to Mr Boyes, Thomas thought it advisable to furnish you with the Returns incase the former ones should have miscarried or have been mislaid  in Mr Boye’s Office.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq.

POL 31st July 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith nominal List of Persons employed in the Police at Launceston during the months of May 1830

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

cf P Magistrate

POL 31st may 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to inform me if Thomas Lake per Mary who has been employed as a clerk in this office since the 3d instant in to receive any pay and if so what sum

P86

I have taken the liberty to annex the names of the prisoner clerks employed in this office with the rate of pay they receive opposite their respective names

Cf P Magistrate

POL 31st may 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose the information of Mr Archibald Thomson in the case of Re v Rose/Rave? Together with copy of the lists of articles stolen from his house and I regret to add that the list mentioned in Mr Thomsons examination has been mislaid.

I have…

Attorney General

Information returned to the Attorney general in the case of Rex versus Proctor

P86 continued

To Mr Bateman

POL 30th May 1830

Sir

I request to be informed as whether you have obtained any further information respecting the outrages said where being committed towards the native women at Piper’s River and whether every possible exertion has been used to discover the body of the women said to have been murdered. In order that I may be enabled to enquire fully into the matter; and report the result for the Information of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor.

I have the honor

William Lyttleton

P87

PO Launceston 7th June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to annex a personal description of John Evans no 13 as requested in your letter of the 28th ultimo.

I have…

Josiah Spode JP

Muster Master

POL 7th June 1830

Sir

His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor may be pleased at the commencement of the present year? To order that two shillings per diem be paid to all Field Police and Field Constables and that one month’s pay should be paid in advance to the Police Magistrates in order that the constables may receive their wages weekly. I have the honor  to inform you that all the constables in this District were made acquainted with His Excellency’s Pleasure on that Head, and that consider able murmur and dissatisfaction has been expressed amongst them in consequence of the length of time they have been kept out of their pay at this time the Field Police and Petty Constables in this District have ten week pay due to them and I am  are that many of them experience much inconvenience as well as loss in being obliged in soliciting credit  from the Publicans and other dealers and

P88

Some of them I fear when receive three months pay at a time amounts to eight or nine pounds are apt to spend their proceeds? In drinking and gambling Houses to the injury of their creditors as well as themselves and I feel confident that much good would arise by paying them every week. I understand from W Spode that the vouchers for April may and June have been recd by him from this office and forwarded to the proper authorities but where or by whom detained I know not However I trust His Excellency will deem the matter of sufficient importance to command prompt and future regular attention of those concerned

I have…

J Burnett Esq

POL 7th June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose returned enclosed herewith informations in the case of Re v Cantwell and another together with  the further statements of Thomas Faro.

I have…

Algernon Montagu esq

POL 7th June

Sir

I have the honor to enclose a statement on  ash? Relative  to the ten pound note stated to have been delivered to me by my predecessor Mr Gordon.

Mr Welsh the Chief District Constable  informs

P89

Me that the trunk in question was received by him from Mr Gordon himself, and that it was accompanied by a list of the contents, which he has shewn me, and in which no mention whatever is made of a Ten pound note, although there was ample room  on the paper to have done so.

I have

Algernon Montagu esq

PO L  7th June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to cause Ann Easton  per mermaid who is now in the Factory at George Town to appear before you and taken her examination on oath as to what she knows respecting Hannah Yewband? Per mermaid (who was convicted with her) being married or otherwise and forward the same to this office by return of messenger for the Information of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor.

I have…

John Clark Esquire

Police Magistrate

George Town

P90

POL 14th June 1830

Sir

In reply to your letter of the 4th instant requesting to be informed by what authority Thomas Lake 505 was appointed a clerk in this office. I have the honor to inform you that he arrived here on the 3rd of May with a pass from your office and a memo? From Mr Gunns stating that he was to be employed as a clerk in this office.

I have…

PA Mulgrave

Cf P Magistrate

POL 14th June 1830

Sir

I have the Honor to request you will be pleased to forward to this office by return of messenger a few printed? Forms of salary abstract.

I have…

Josiah Spode Esquire

POL 14th June 1830

Sir

With reference to your circular of the 2nd instant respecting Bonds entered into by persons leasing Crown Lands I have the honor to inform you that no such Bond or Bonds are in this office there are however seeral blank private forms of Bonds for that Purpose.

I have…

JH Moore Esq JP

Collect ??? internal  revenue

P91

POL 14th June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to inform you Thomas Brennan a Clerk employed in this office has complained to me that Mr Sinclair has refused to enter his name in his lists for pay due to Prisoner Clerks in lieu of slop clothing I should therefore feel obliged if you would ascertain if it is His Excellencies Pleasure that Brennan should receive pay in lieu of slops the    same as all the other Prisoner Clerks in this office and if so to cause the necessary instruction to be given to W Sinclair.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esq

Cf PM

POL 21st June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to enclose herewith a list of persons employed in the Police at Launceston entitled to salary for the quarter ending the 30th instant.

I have the honor to be.

Josiah Spode Esquire JP

P92

POL 21st June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant together with a list of stationery for the use of this office and beg leave to inform you that on unpacking the case only five hundred quills instead of six hundred, and one ream of post papers instead of two reams have been received, that the Book marked Letter Book is of very inferior paper which is mildewed from one end to the other, that the two colonial made books are of bad paper unwieldy and (in my opinion) unfit for Registers, and that the two Reams of Foolscap paper which are labeled “superfine foolscap”  is of very inferior quality I therefore conclude the Government had been imposed? Upon by the furnishers of those stores.

I have…

PA Mulgrave Esquire

Cf P Magistrate

POL 21st June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to send to this office some printed forms of permits and of Magisterial duties for weekly return as I am entirely estitute of both.

I have…

Josiah Spode Esq

P93

POL 21st June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 18th inst. Respecting the Prisoners named in the margin [ Jno Banks 555] and beg leave to inform you that he has passed himself off as a free man since Nov 1828 in consequence of an order for  pass sigd by Mr Sinclair which he gave on the authority of the enclosed documents which you will observe had been sent? Without signatures from your office.

I have…

RH Woods Esq.

POL 21 st June 1830

Sir

I have the honor to request you will be pleased to inform me if a person convicted of Hand???y convicts?  Or? Retracting? Sperel???? Legaans?  By virtue of the act  in council can demand copies of the defamations in case of appeal to the quarter sessions, and whither such copies can be given with or without the consent of the informers.

I have…

Alfred Stephens Esq

???????? General

p94

28th June 1830

Sir

I beg leave to remind you that on the 14th instant I wrote to you requesting some printed forms of salary abstracts might be furnished to this office it appears that forms for unfixed contingencies  have been sent instead, I have therefore been obliged to forward one of the monthly abstracts for July upon a written form as I can not obtain a printed  at any of the offices here and I should feel obliged if you will forward me a few of the required forms by return of messenger

I have….

Josiah Spode Esq.

P95

To: Peter Archer Mulgrave Esquire

Police Magistrate

Hobart Town

21st Feby 1829

Sir

You will perceive by the gazette do that the sittings of the Court of Requests and Quarter session already advertised to be held at Launceston on the 2nd and 5th of March are postponed – the language of the new act of Parliament, which works a repeat of the existing act on the 1st of March, is the occasion of it, and I perceived that personal risk and danger would attend the Commissioners and Justices if this mode was not adopted – the difficulties I made known to His Excellency, and I have….

P96

Had to request from you, and, through you, from the rest of my brother Magistrates, pardon for stopping the session without previous communication as it was impossible to be had; and in reference to the safety of the Magistrates of Cornwall the result must have been the same – namely a postponement – should any point arise owing to the measure I shall be most happy to have an opportunity of setting it at rest.

I have the honor to be,

Sir,

Your very obedient Humble servant

Joseph Hone?

[margin]

Joseph Hone

21st February 1829

postponing sittings of the quarter sessions and Court of Request

sini dies

p97

in pencil

Prepare the necessary directions for the  P???? Supr to furnish Mr Lucas with another man and to prepare a letter and enclose and forward this communication by today’s post to the Police Magistrate at Launceston.  J?B 24 Dec

[William Means footnote [ii] ]

Launceston

12 December 1829

To

His Excellency

The Lieut Governor

Sir,

I have the honor to address you, relative to one of the men (William Means) who I received in Hobarton to accompany me on the exploring expedition, the conduct of this man had been most notoriously bad during the whole time that I have been in the bush, and I was convinced that it is so deeply engrained within him, that there is not the slightest probability of a change, he has given me much trouble, and seems ?????? to perservere in his determination to render himself as little useful to me as possible, besides I am apprehensive that some serious occurrence will happen before I shall have completed the expedition, if he continues till that time to accompany me: he has already presented his musket at one of the other men, and I have no doubt would have shot him at the moment, had his gun been prepared, but having to take off the case that protects the locks from the leather the weapon was wrested from him just as he was presenting it, he has also mentioned to the other men…

P98

His intention to “make away” with me, if I get him punished for his gross conduct, however such threats as these I would endeavour to guard against but he has expressed to me his determination to render himself as little serviceable? As possible, and his language from morning till evening is much disgusting which he persists in, soley to annoy me, thinking it will induce me to return him to the Public Works, I applied this morning to the Commandant here, to ask his sanition? To have the man changed, which he refused without particular order from Hobarton to that effect – I would have gone on without the man, if I could have done with less than 3 men, but as ??????, I am necessitated to take him again with me. I confidently hope that Your Excellency will be pleased to allow me to have this man changed, and if an order to that effect be forwarded to the authorities at Launceston I have a friend on this side who will recall the man and send him to meet me the next time I penetrate to the southward? Whom I shall gladly send Means in.

When I arrived here my men were wholly

[Left margin]

Should not this man W Means whose conduct seems to have been so atrocious to be punished in some way? If he is simply returned to the Public Works which he desires I will be a sort of reward for this misconduct?  R?B  23d Dec.

P99

Destitute of trowsers and shoes, I applied to get them some from HM Stores here, but the Commandant refused my application in consequence of his not having been informed that I was on Public Service; to prevent delay, I purchased these articles for the men and tomorrow I shall proceed to the interior to continue my pursuit.

I have the honor to be

Your Excellency’s

Most obedt and humble servant

T.Lewis

“Memo” Let for Geo Arthur (in pencil)

Inform the Commt at Launceston that I will approve of William Means being exchanged for another man at Launceston and of slops being supplied to the Lewis’s party

23 Decr

EG?

P100

Unfortunately, Mr Lewis has not complained of this man, as he should have done, to the Police Magistrate, and it would be improper to punish him without his being heard in his defence. This letter may be sent to Mr Lyttleton who will as far as he is able to do so enquire into the subject “WM Means” when ?????? ?????? ?????? Public Works was I think in the chain Gang, and, if so, of course, he should be returned to it. The Asst Principal Supt in Launceston must supply Mr Lewis with the best man he can find who is disposable.

23 Decr

EB?

Ad???d 25 lashes and to be returned to the Chain Gang until his nature? Of humfortatic? Impairs? In April next.

15 July W Lyttleton

15 Febryary 1830

Thomas Lewis

V

WM Means

Decided 16th/2/30

P101

Sep 1829 [in purple pencil]

The information and complaint of Thomas Stewart of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land CARPENTER taken upon oath before me, one of his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, this twenty third day of September in the Year  of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and twenty nine which said informant on his Oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as which said informant, on his oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):

On Friday last the 18th instant I lost a pair of spectacles my property from my trowser pocket I do not know where I lost them I was tipsey at the time on last Sunday afternoon I saw John Bryant I told him I had lost my spectacles he said he knew where he could get me a pair for seven shillings and six pence I said I have got no money but I will give you this pair of trowsers for the spectacles and I pulled  a pair of new corduroy trowsers off my person and gave them to him Bryan was then a little tipsey and he drank some more and kept the trowsers for about an hour, he said it would be time enough tomorrow to get me the spectacles and I was afraid of losing my trowsers and informed district Constable Dell of the circumstance

P102

Bryant did not say the spectacles he could get for seven shillings and six pence were the same I had lost he did  not tell me where they were, he was not with me when I lost them.

Rex v John Bryant

Fraud

Dismissed 24 Sept 1829

P103

The information and complaint of John Christie of Perth in Van Diemen’s Land YEOMAN taken upon oath before me, one of his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, this twenty second day of September in the Year  of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and twenty nine which said informant on his Oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as which said informant, on his oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):

Yesterday I came into town with a Load of Wheat I arrived in Town about 12 o clock, I delivered the Wheat to Mr Field and then took the cart and Bullocks to W Houghton’s Public House in Brisbane Street, and put them in the yard, and then went in and got my Dinner, I then went out on Business and bought two pairs of Trowsers at W Cameron’s Shop and gave them to John Barrett. I was out a considerable time it was between 8 and 9 o clock when I returned to  Houghton’s, Mr Houghton told some of his Servants to take my Cart and Bullocks into the Street which was done. I then went into the Yard and not seeing the cart there I enquired for it, the Prisoner (Oliver Turner) said he would shew me, I went into the Tap Room & a Young Man who I have heard is Mr Houghton’s son gave me the Trowsers I had purchased at Cameron’s, I then went to the Front of the House accompanied by the Prisoner, the Cart & Bullocks were standing in the street, John Barrett was in the Cart he was going home with me, I went up to the Tail of the Cart the Prisoner was with me I put the Trowsers into the cart close by Barrett and went up to the Bullocks to drive  them Home as I was turing the leading Bullocks round I heard Barrett call out “Holloa bring them Trowsers back”.

P104

I instantly turnd my head and saw the Prisoner with the Trowsers under his arm running across the street toward Houghton’s Premises, I did not perceive whether he went into the House or thro’ the gate into the Yard I went into the House and enquired of Mr Houghton for his Man he said he did not know where he was, I told him that I had lost two pair of trowsers our of the Cart and that I had seem Turner take them to his Premises. Mr Houghton did not enquire for the  man I did not hear him call for any Person. I then went in search of a Constable. Constable Dell went with me we went into the Tap Room at W Houghton’s where the Prisoner was then sitting. I told the Constable that was the man who took the Trowsers he took him in Custody, I have never seem the Trowsers since whiles the constable was in the Tap Room Young Mr Houghton came in and asked if Bail would be taken for the man, it was refused. I asked Houghton if he had seen anything of the Trowsers he said he had not.

John Christie (signed)

Sworn before me

James Gordon (signed)

P105

Rex  versus Oliver Turner

Felony

Decided 10th Oct 1829

P106

The examination of JOHN BARRETT of PERTH in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon Oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, the 24th Day of September in the Year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty nine, in the presence and hearing of OLIVER TURNER

Duly charged before me, upon Oath with

Stealing  two pair of corduroy trowsers on the night of the 21st day of September instant from the cart of John Christie the property of the said John Christie.

Which said Deponent on his Oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):-

On Monday last I came to Launceston with John Christie I had my dinner with Christie at Mr Houghton’s Public House after I had got my dinner I went with Christie  to Mr Cameron’s Shop where Christie bought two pair of corduroy trowsers we returned to Mr Houghton’s Christie gave me the Trowsers and I have them to Mr Hoppy’s man whose name is George I do not know his other name. I gave him the trowsers to take care of for me and then I went into the cart to take care of the things which were in the cart, a considerable time after this Christie came to take the cart and things home, Christie and Turner came up to the Cart and drove it out of the yard. Christie…

P107

Went into the House again and shortly after returned and I saw him put the two pair of Trowsers into the cart this man was standing by the Bullocks at the time and Christie took his whip to drive on, when Turner said now you are all right you may drive on, and he came to the back part of the cart and snatched out the Trowsers I saw him, and called to him holloa bring them Trowsers back he run away and went into the Yard of Mr Houghtons Public House I remained in the Cart and Christie went into the House to look for the man, I have not seen the Trowsers since

John X Barrett

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston

On the day and year above written

James Gordon

P108

Plan of Mr Dry’s House

[6 x shorthand symbols – means ELPHIN??]  Farm

4 room? Home – as Rectangle –  shown with A, B,C drawn on it

p109  [Richard Dry bio  [iii]]

The information on oath of Mr Joseph Archer of Pansanger who deposeth and saith I went to bed about eleven o clock on the night of the ninth instant with Mrs Archer in the House of Mr Richard  Dry at Elphin  near Launceston the room is under the roof of the dwelling house, and the door of that room opens into a veranda, which leads from the front door of the House to that Room, the verandah is separated from the yard in front of the House by a Railing only, there are two windows in that room, which have outside shutters fastened by Iron Bars outside and Bolts which pass through those Bars into the room, and are generally fastened with Keys put through the ends of the Bolts, when I went into the Room both the sashes were down, and the shutters of Both windows closed to the shutters of the window nearest the

P110

Door were fastened s I have described, I took the key out of the Bolt and shoved the bolt outwards, then opened the sash of the window and pushed one shutter about two inches from the sash for the purpose of administering the light into the room in the morning I then closed down the sash, the door of that room was latched only, the outer handle of the latch being broken off which presented it from being opened on the outside without great difficulty.

I was awoke about half past twelve o clock and suspected there was somebody in the room, I jumped out of Bed and the Room being dark I threw the Door open, but even then could not see distinctly what was in the room, I went towards the right hand corner of the room from the door, and immediately I got to the end of the room, I saw a person pass rapidly to the door and out of it

P111

I followed very close to that person I think within fifteen paces of that person, until it reaches the entrance into the smaller enclosure in front of Mr Dry’s House, but I was nearer to that person when under the verandah, the person proceeded from thence along the New Road I followed that person some distance on the New Road  but could not overtake that person, it was starlight and although it was very dark in the room, the saw the outline of the figure of that person and did not lose sight of it until I stopped in the new road and by the starlight I plainly distinguished the height figure and color of the clothes and hair, it appeared to be a tall man, of about the same size and height of William Richards his hair of the same colour, and his jacket of the same colour as that now work by William Richard, he was without a hat when he ran across the room, he made no noise I could

P112

Not hear any footsteps. I returned to the bedroom, the sashes of both windows were down, the window shutters which I had partially opened before I went to bed were quite open and the bolt which I had partly shoved out of the hole through which it passed into the bedroom was entirely our and the curtain of that window was in a different position from that I left it in when I went to bed and appeared as if it had been drawn violently out of its place I lifted up the lower sash of the window and found that it could be put up and down again without making the lease noise. Mr James Cox’s shewed me a pair of laced leather quarter boots and a straw hat that night which he marked in my presence by an X and cutting a hole in the drown of the Hat, this is the Hat now

P113

Produced by District Constable John Dell.

/signed/ Joseph Archer

Sworn before me at Launceston the eleventh day of February 1829 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richard

Sd  PA Mulgrave

The information on oath of James Cox Esquire who deposeth and saith I slept at the House of Mr Richard Dry at Elphin last night, about one o clock this morning I was called up and in front of a room occupied by Mr and Mrs Joseph Archer I found this pair of laced quarter Boots and this straw Hat close under a window the shutter of which were open, the sash was closed down

P114

But not fastened, I marked three Boots and that before  gave them our of my possession I saw them put nto a storeroom in Mr Dry’s House last night and I saw them there again this morning I am positive these are the same hat and Boots – These are the marks I put upon the Boots and this is the Mark I put upon the Hat

/signed/ James Cox

Sworn before me at Launceston this tenth day of February 1829

signed PA Mulgrave

p115

The information on oath of mr William Lyons who deposeth and saith I am the Brother in law of Mr Richard Dry and assist in superintending his agricultural business William Richards has been assigned servant to Mr Dry about three years and chiefly employed at Belle Vue near eighteen miles from Mr Dry’s chief residence at Elphin about two miles from Launceston; I was at Elphin last Monday night the ninth instant I was alarmed about midnight and was shewn a hat and a pair of Shoes by Mr James Cox, I immediately recognized the hat which I had recently seen William Richards wear at Bell Vue, it was a Broad plaited Straw hat with  piece of Black silk or Ribbon round it and part of the Brim broken off I had observed that broken piece several times at Belle Vue this is the Hat and these are the Shoes that were shewn me by Mr Cox on Monday night. I am certain that I have seen William Richards wear that Hat repeatedly, and immediately after Mr Cox had shown it

P116

To me I went on Horse back to the Men’s Hut at Bell Vue where Richards generally lived with others of Mr Dry’s servants. I arrived there about an hour and a half before day light, I required of Charles Roberts who usually slept with Richard where be Richards was, Roberts said that he went to bed with him but did not know what time he got up again or where he was gone, I searched the Hut but could not find Richards or any Hat or shoes that I knew belonged to him, I searched all the places at Belle Vue where any of the men usually slept, but did not find Richards, I watched until abut ten minutes before sunrise and then saw Richards coming in front of the House and about a quarter of a mile from it in the nearest direction from Launceston to the Hut where be usually slept, he sometimes walked and sometimes trotted

P117

As he came towards the House, I met him accompanied by Mr John Simpson about a hundred yards from his Hut he was without Hat or Shoes he did not appear much heated but seemed very much confused when we went up to him Robert Brand was also with me and said to Richards we are here before you, Richards replied what do you mean, I then said to Richards do you recollect being in Mr Dry’s House last night * he made no answer but appeared much confused, his feet and toes on the sides and points appeared white as if he had been walking a distance through grass, I examined his feet particularly but saw no scratches upon them, he then wore a white pair of trowsers a drab woolen jacket and waistcoat a checked shirt and a yellow handkerchief round his neck. I then took Richards to the House and said to him you must have walked very quick to be here at this time of the morning he replied what do you mean I

P118

I said oh you do not recollect being in the house then last night he replied oh never mind they can  but hang me, I am not sure if I said in the House or Mr Drys House, I cannot be certain which, Richards could have no business to leave Belle Vue that night, I was there full an hour and a half before he returned, and the day had then broken about twenty minutes. I now that Mr Joseph Archer and his wife slept in an end room in Mr Dry’s House at Elphin on last Monday night, and I also know that some of mr Dry’s grown up daughters frequently slept in that room and I also know that those young ladies have frequently slept in that same room when Richard has been at Elphin, and it is most probable he might have known where they slept. The plan now shewn me is a correct description of the front of Mr Dry’s House at Elphin, the

P119

Front yards is enclosed by paling leaving five gates all which gates are generally closed at night the room marked A is the room in which Mr and Mrs Joseph Archer slept on the night of last Monday. B is a verandah in front of the House, closed in front by a railing and Gate in the Centre which is always shut at night. We were in the  House at Belle Vue when we first saw Richards approaching his Hut and concealed from his view until he got within about a hundred yards of the garden paling when as we went towards him he stopped sat down and pretended to be easing himself, but I am sure he did not ease himself before he got up, I do not think he so sat more than two minutes I am not certain if any person told him to get up or not it appeared to me tht he stopped the moment he saw us.

/signed/ Williams Lyos

sworn…

p120

before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of February 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards.

Signed PA Mulgrave

The information on oath of Mr John Simpson who deposeth and saith I am overseer to Mr Richard Dry at Belle Vue, William Richards was Mr Dry’s assigned servant and employed under my order on the ninth instant I saw him reaping in a field about half past five o clock on the evening of that day he wore a straw hat which was broken in the Tim in several places it was a very old hat and had a strip of something Black round it, I know he had two pair of quarter Boots, one pair new and another pair he had worn some time and

P121

I think I should know them again,  if I were to see them one of them had a crack in it and one of them had the tie broken his Boots were longer than any other man’s Boots on the farm they were long and rather narrow.

I did not give him leave of absence on Monday, he ought not to have left the farm, without getting a pass from me. The next morning I was in the House at Belle Vue with William Lyons and Robert Brand just before sunrise, when I saw Richards about a quarter of a mile off coming in a direction from Launceston  towards his Hut, he sometimes ran and sometimes walked when he was between one and two hundred yards of the garden fence we went out of the House and as we were going round the fence he stopped I supposed because he saw us and he unbuttoned his trowsers and stooped down as if to ease himself, we went up to him I said where have you been all night leaving the farm you

P122

Have been about some bad action, he looked hard at me but said nothing, he seemed frightened William Lyons and Robert Brand spoke to Richards but I did not pay any attention to what passed, Richards was without shoes hat or cap.

This is the hat Richards wore on last Monday week these are Richard’s Boots, I know them by the form and size and the particular way in which they are turned up at the toes it was an older pair that I described in the former part of this information I have not the least doubt in the world tht these are a pair of Richard’s Boots.

/signed/ John Simpson

£100 [in margin]

p123

Sworn before me at Launceston the seventeenth day of February 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards.

/signed/ PA Mulgrave

The information on oath of Charles Roberts an assigned servant to Mr Richard Dry who deposeth and saith I lived at my master’s farm at Belle Vue on Monday the ninth instant, William Richards had slept with me every night for about a month before that night, I went to bed just at dark that night. Richards was not then in bed, I slept until I was awoke the next morning by Mr William Lyons and from the appearance of the Be and Bed clothes I did not that that any one

P124

Had been in bed with me.

I last saw Richards on that ay about sundown, in the Harvest field, I got my supper in the Hut that night with the rest of the men, Richards was not there I must have seen him if he had been there, he wore an old straw hat that day, I do now know if it was broken in the Rim or not, I do not know what Boots or shows he wore on that day, I should not know the Boots he generally wore if I were to see them I do not know if this is his hat or not I do not know if these are his Boots or not.

Signed Charles Roberts

His X mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the seventeenth day of February 1829 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards

Signed PA Mulgrave

P125

The information on oath of Robert Brand free and overseer to Mr Richard Dry who deposeth and saith I went from Elphin to Belle Vue with Mr William Lyons last Tuesday morning we arrived there about an hour and a half before sunrise, we mustered Mr Dry’s and searched the premises William Richards ome of M Dry’s assigned servants could not be found, a little before sunrise I saw Richards about a quarter of a mile from the House at Belle Vue coming across the grass in the nearest direction from Launceston towards his Hut William Lyons Mr Simpson and I met him near the garden fence, about a hundred yards from his Hut he ran part and walked part of the way, he was without Hat or Shoes, he wore white trowsers a drab woolen jacket and waistcoat a striped shirt

P126

And a yellows handkerchief round his neck, we were in the House when we first saw him in a position where he could not see us, and we remained there until he was about a hundred yards from the Garden Fence and as soon as it was possible he could hear? See no? us, he stopped and unbuttoned his trowsers and sat down as if to ease himself we went up to him, whilst he was in that position and he so sat about two minutes altogether when he got up and buttoned his trowsers no one told him to get up I took particular notice of the place where he sat and I am sure he did not ease himself, I asked him where his hat and Shoes were, he said I do not know, I said to

P127

Him Billy you have made very good haste, I did not expect you here so soon, he replied, I do not know what you are talking about, what do you mean, I do not think he appeared much confused, I did not examine his feet, we took Richards to the House and Mr William Lyons said some thing to him which I do now exactly recollect but I know Richards replied, I do now care anything about it, all they can do is to hang me, Richards did not appear heated, it was a cold morning I thought from his countenance he was a goo deal fatigued, he appeared like a man who had been up all night, I never took any particular notice of his Hat and shoes before that day, we took him to Mr Ashburner’s that forenoon , and on the way I asked Richards if he was not tired walking all night to, he replied no I can walk for eight and forty hours any time I said how come you to take in into your

P128

Head to go to mr Drys, he has always behaved very well to you, he replied it is a damned put up job altogether.

Richards returned from the House at Belle Vue to his Hut, he took a pair of shoes from under his bed, which he said were his, they were quite new and had never been worn, he soaked them in water before he put them on to go to Mr Ashburner’s I am sure those shoes were quite new.

/signed/ Robert Brand

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of February 1829 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards.

/signed/ PA Mulgrave.

P129

The information on oath of Mr Henry Hinksman Police Officer who deposeth and saith, on the morning of the tenth instant, I went to the place where  the road from Belle Vue joins the main road leading from Norfolk Plains to Launceston I waited there until day break.

I believe I waited there about an hour and then perceived the prints of two naked feet going from Launceston towards the junction of the roads but I did not leave those footsteps along the road leading to Norfolk Plains beyond the junction nor could I trace them along the road leading to Belle Vue from that junction for this latter road was more grassy than the main road, the first print of naked feet was about ten yards from the junction of the road, the prints were wide apart as if made by a tall man running I traced these naked footsteps at intervals unto the top of the Sand Hills and I traced the same prints of naked feet along a bye road leading to Elphin to the top of a Hill, I then proceeded in a direct line for Elphin got over a fence into Mr Sipson’s paddock where

P130

I found the prints of one naked foot, I measured at least twenty of the prints of naked feet between the junction of the roads and Mr Waddle’s paddock, I also measured the print in Mr Waddle’s paddock and that in Mr Cimpson’s paddock they were all of the same length and breadth and must hav been made by a person ging from the direction of Elphin and the prints in Mr Simpson’s paddock was about three hundred yards from Elphin this piece of tape is the exact length of the prints of those naked feet from the extremity of the heel to that of the great toe – it measured exactly eleven inches and I think must have been rather shorter than the feet that made those prints as they were made in soft dry places where the sand had fallen in and this piece of tape is the breadth of the widest past of those prints, it measured exactly three inches and seven eighths, I have measured the naked feet

P131

Of William Richards with those tapes and they are of exactly the same length and breadth as the prints traced.

About a quarter of a mile from the junction of those roads I saw the toe? Point of a footstep made by a shoe by the side of the main road the footstep was leading towards Launceston, I did not measure it but I perceived it was the print of a right shoe. The sole of which was without nails and the Heel had two rows of small nails about half round it and one large nail on the water side of the heel. I saw another footstep about quarter of a mile before I got out of the road heading from Norfolk Plains to Mr Alexander Waddle’s House I measured it, it was a little longer and a little broader than that tape, the footstep was towards Elphin, there were no marks

£100  in margin

P132

Of mails in the sole of the shoe that made that print but the same marks of nails in the Heel as in the first print made by a shoe, there was also the prints of a left shoe near to this as if made by the same step, that shoe did not appear to have any nails in the sole, there were marks of nails in the Heel but they were indistinct, this shoe which I have now marked if of the same length and breadth in the sole and has the same rows of nails in the Heel as the first and second prints of right shoes I have mentioned it has no nails in the sole, it would be called by some persons a laced quarter boot, the past place where I saw the prints which I believe was made by this shoe was about three quarters of a mile from Elphin and in the direct road….

£100 in margin

p133

from Belle Vue to Elphin.

/signed/ H Hinksman

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of February 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards.

Signed PA Mulgrave

The information on oath of Alexander Cumberbeach a District Constable who deposeth and saith, this straw hat and this pair of laced quarter boots I received from Mr Joseph Archer on the morning of Tuesday the tenth instant

Signed Alexander Cumberbeach

His X mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of February 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards.

P134

The information on oath of Stephen Streatford an assigned servant to Mr Richard Dry who saith, I resided on my master’s farm at Belle Vue on last Monday week the ninth instant William Richards had previously slept in the same Hut with Henry Roberts myself and others of Mr Dry’s men, he had slept in the same bed with Roberts, Richards left work that evening the same time I did about half an hour before sun down, he went towards the Hut where we usually slept, I went to the kitchen with Roberts and others of the men where we got our suppers, Richards did not come there to supper I went to the Hut about eight o clock, Richards was not then in the Hut, I must have seen him if he had been there, I did not see him

P135

Until the next morning when he was brought there by William Lyons.

Charles Roberts James Davis and myself had shoes served? Out to us on the first of last January of the same size as those served out to William Richards, there was only one pair served out to William Richards  * I do no know what the shoes he had on that day I know that on last Monday week Richards wore a straw hat which was broken round the rim I have seen him wear that Hat several times, I do not know if there was anything round that hat on that day or not. I was not awake after I went to bed on the Monday evening until I was awoke by William Lyons I do not know that any of Mr Drys men were absent from

P136

The farm on that night we were mustered the next morning and all were present but Richards, he returned about half an hour after we  were mustered.

/signed/ Stephen Streatford

Sworn before me at Launceston the twentieth day of February 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Richards

Sigd PA Mulgrave

P137

Rex

Versus

William Richards

Sent originals to

Attorney general

6th July 1829

Busnrangers

Wm Richards

J Archer

P138

July 1829 [in blue wax pencil]

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information and complaint on oath of Mary Barrett the wife of Henry Barrett who saith I live with my Husband at Western arm on the left Bank of the Tamar about Seven Miles from George Town Between three and four o clock on Monday three weeks /the 8th of June/ I was in my Husband’s House and Joseph White and my Husband were employed in wheeling fruit from the house down to a Bridge near the River to load a Boat in order to proceed to Launceston, when I heard some one scream out I looked out through the window and saw my husband and White running towards the House from the Bridge and at the same time I saw two other men following them they were running about fifteen yards behind my husband and White they were both armed one of them had a double barreled piece this man was about five feet ten inches high the other was a short thick man the tall man pointed the double barreled Gun at my husband and fired it off I caught up a musket and a fowling piece which were standing in the House they were both loaded I ran out with them and as I was running to meet my Husband I heard two other shots fired and I heard a whistling noise…

P139

Like the passing of a ball near my head which knocked off a branch from a wattle tree near which I was passing the two strangers then had both their Guns pointed towards Barrett they were about thirty yards from Barrett at the time they fired and I heard the tall man say you bloody old bugger I will blow your bloody head off I did not hear the other man say a word I gave one Gun to Barrett and the other to White and the two strange men ran back crossed the bridge and went up a Hill towards the left hand, my husband and White pursued them a little way and then stopped near the Bridge, I went down to them and saw the men on the side of the Hill the tall man said old man I am sorry we have fired we did not come to take anything from you we came to bring your rifle and two pounds of the Money and your new clothes which we took away when we robbed you before, at this time I was not more than fifteen yards from the strange men I stood and looked at them several times during that time, I had a plain view of their persons, the tall man appeared young about thirty years of age, he had high cheek bones, large whiskers, and  curly hair, which was dark brown as well as his whiskers, his hair curled a good deal under the rim of his hat

P140

Which was a good black one with a high crown, he wore fustian trowsers, a black cloth waistcoat, a black handkerchief and a very narrow striped shirt, he was in his shirt sleeves, the shorter man had his face blackened, he had a round face, small features, his neck and hands were also blackened, he wore a pair of ragged blue trowsers, a blue jacket, I did not see his waistcoat, the lining of his jacket hung down below the bottom of the jacket he wore a red and white cap with the white side outwards, the bottom of it was turned up and shewed the red part of the cap, I did not perceive if he had any whiskers, I do not know the colour of his hair, I had not so good a view of him as I had of the tall man, about the first of last April on a Sunday morning the first Sunday after the Races at Launceston I was in the House of George Morgan in Launceston where I saw a tall man whose name I did not know in company with Bernard Passgrove, the day following I proceeded home and arrive there the following Wednesday and I found that our House had been robbed of nearly all its moveables amongst which was a musket which I should know again if I was to see it, I am positive that the tall man I saw near my Husband’s House on the eighth of June and who fired off a

P141

Double barreled Gun at my Husband on that day is that same man I had previously seen in George Morgan’s House in Launceston about six weeks after I had seen him in Morgan’s House, I was again  in Launceston and enquired of Mrs Morgan who the tall man I had seen with Passgrove at her House was, she said his nae was John Cairns and lived over the water and rented a Farm of David Williams, I did not see that man from the time I saw him in Morgan’s House until I saw him fire at my Husband on the eighth of June, I have not seen him since. The short man I saw near my husbands House on the eighth of June with his face blackened  was about the same size and height as Bernard Passgrove and his features very much resembled those of Passgrove be was a smart made man, rather stumpy and round shouldered and I verily believe that the man who had his face blackened near my husband’s House is the said Bernard Passgrove.

/signed/ Mary X Barrett

her mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the first day of July 1829

/signed/ H Simpson

p142

The further information on oath of Mary Barrett who saith I have just seen several men at the police Office and amongst them John Cairns and Bernard Cosgrove and I swear positively that John Cairns is the tall man I have described in my former information as having fired at my Husband on the eighth of June and Bernard Cosgrove is the man I yesterday described by the name of Passgrove, he now says his name is Barnard Cosgrove I cannot swear positively that he is the man I saw with Cairns near my husband’s House on the eighth of June but he is very like that man, he has round features, his thick neck his height and size are just like that of the man I saw with Cairns I have no doubt that he is the man I saw with Cairns on the eighth of June and had his face blackened

/signed/  Mary X Barrett

her mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the second day of July 1829 and read over to the Deponent in the presence of John Cairns and Barnard Cosgrove as well as her former information and complaint.

/signed/ H Simpson

p143

The information and complaint on oath of Henry Barrett who saith I live at York Town about six miles from Georg Town, on a Tuesday about the beginning of last may my House was robbed by two armed men when they took away a musket, a Rifle, a double barreled Pistol, a Horse pistol, and several articles of Bedding, wearing apparel and Provisions. I was in their company three hours o that day, and I should know the men again, one of them was a tall man about five feet ten inches high, the other was about five feet five inches high, his face was blackened I am sure I should know him again as well as the tall man who was not disguised. On a Monday in the early part of June I was attacked by two armed men on a Bridge about a hundred and sixty yards from my House. Joseph White was with me on that day and the armed men ran towards us and called out stand, we ran towards the House they fired three shots at us as we retreated neither of us was wounded, I heard one of the Balls whistle the men were within fifteen yards of White when they fired the first shot, they were within five yards of us when they drove us off the Bridge, I saw their faces quite plain

P144

One of them was a short man he had his face blackened the other man was not disguised. I am sure they are the same two men who robbed my House on or about the beginning of May, and I should know them again if I were to see them, I have had the musket thirteen years which they took away, it is an old musket, a very remarkable one, it is only half stocked, there was a piece of copper upon the end of the stock an round the barrel, and there is a crack in the stock at the head of one or both of the screws which fasten the Lock and another cracked the but end of the stock, I have seen seven men this morning at the Police Office neither of them are of the men who robbed my house or fired at me as I have before stated I am sure this man Bernard Cosgrove is not the short man ho had his face blackened at my House when it was robbed and when I was fired at one the 8th of June. I never saw this an Cosgrove before in my life the man who had his face blackened was of a fair complexion this man Cosgrove is very dark, he had carroty whiskers, this man has black ones and is not so stout as the man who robbed me and fired at me  that man had a very long nose, this man has a short small nose.

P145

This musket is mine, and the same that was stolen from my House in last May.

/signed/ Henry Barrett

his X mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the ninth day of July 1829

/signed/ JC Simpson

[on angle in margin]

a musket lately from a man who attacked Mr Hobler on the 15th June [see Mr Hobler’s information ] s??? to the witness.

The further information on oath of Henry Barrett  who saith neither of the men now present are of the men who robbed my House and fired at me I am sure this man John Cairns is not one of those men.

/signed/ Henry Barrett

his x mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the ninth day of July 1829

/signed/ JC Simpson

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information on oath of George Hobler Esquire of Killafady wo saith about six o clock last evening, I was sitting alone at the table in my sitting room, reading a newspaper, at the time two doors were open one leading into a kitchen…

P146

The other near it opening into my bedroom, I heard some person come into the room from the kitchen but as there was much traffic too and fro on account of the children being ill with the hooping cough, I took no notice, in a moment a strange voice addressed me “if you stir I’ll shoot you” I repied whats that and looking across the table, saw a tall man standing opposite me presenting towards me a musket with the bayonet fixed, who repeated “if you move I’II shoot you” very well I replied I won’t, don’t frighten the children at the same time I slowly rose from my chair the stranger then said, come out, come out, I say I replied I will, the then, walked backwards towards the kitchen door, with his musket presented about three feet from my breast, repeating “come out, come out” I followed him very slowly, and kept edging off – towards the bedroom door with the intention of rushing in there if I had a chance, in a few steps I was opposite the bedroom door to which and this time Mrs Hobler had come from the bedroom I stepped back into the doorway of the bedroom the stranger having backed through the door way of the kitchen when

P147

As I imagine suspecting my motive, he stepped forward again into the sitting room,and lowered his head to his musket, as if in the act of firing, at this instant, Mrs H seized the musket by the barrel and raising it above his level it went off and several balls were lodged in the upper part of the door case about four inches above me head I immediately closed and bolted the bed room door, seized my arms, and coming into the sitting room found he had departed and that Mrs H had bolted the door upon him. [blank space] Having any arms around me, and the family within the bolts, I did not attempt to pursue, extinguished the lights in case any person came to the windows. In am minute more my servant Mr Reed then in the kitchen said they had ran away, I let him into the sitting room to assist me when he said he seized the man as he retreated, but having my little Boy under the other arm he had got from him, leaving his musket behind him – the only expression used by the man who fired, after his doing so, was take that you bugger. [blank space] this is the musket and Bayonet whiles Mulal ? [Michael?] Reed shewed me immediately after the strange man had gone away. One of my men named Trimmings brought me this Hat this morning and said he found it about twenty yards from the kitchen door.

P148

I do not know that I could identify the man who shot at me except by his voice which was very deep and hoarse.

/signed/ George Hobler

Sworn before me at Launceston the sixteenth day of June 1829

/signed/ PA Mulgrave

The examination of Joseph White who saith I am free by servitude and live at the house of Henry Barrett at Western Arm on the River Tamar seven miles from George Town between three and four o clock on the afternoon of last Monday the 8th of June Henry Barrett and I were employed wheeling fruit from Barrett’s House to the River side intending to come to Launceston in Barrett’s boat which was laying by the Edge of the River when two strange me came running towards us with Guns Pointed at us and they cried out stand Barrett and I ran from them they fired three shots a Ball from one of the Guns whistled close past my head Mrs Barrett was in the House we called out to her to bring out the piece she came out of the House with a Gun in her hand she gave me the Gun which I handed to Barrett and ran into the House and got a musket and returned to

P149

Barrett who was near to the River guarding the Fruit – the fruit was on a bridge which leads across a creek and on the opposite side of the creek out of gunshot I saw the same two men who had fired at us one of them was a tall man the other was a short stiff man, the tall man called to us and said we do not want to distress you we want to bring back a rifle piece a musket and some new clothes which we took from your House before, Barratt’s House had been robbed by two men about nine weeks ago I said to them what is the use of palarvering in that way see how you have served him (Barrett) before you marched him a Prisoner and tied him up, they said good bye take care of your head old man for a while, and they then disappeared it was then about five o clock the tide was flowing our boat was in a shed on the opposite side of the Creek to the House a pair of paddles were in her but no sails. Barrett and I took the fruit up to the House and between seven and eight o clock Barrett went down to the Boat shed came back and said his Boat was gone.

When I first saw the two men I was on the Bridge that leads over the creek they were on the side of the creek opposite

P150

The garden the first word they said was stand they were then about twelve yards from us they then both pointed their Guns at us Barrett and I ran towards the House they crossed the Bridge and it was then they fired three shots after us the tall man had a double barreled Gun I had seen Barrett’s boat in the Boat Shed about two hours before they came after they had fired at us they ran back over the Bridge to the top of the Creek they stopped there and the tall man then said that he was bringing the things back that he had taken away before neither of the men produced a rifle of any thing else, Barrett then had got a Gun and I had a musket and we had ammunition we did not go after them me, I did not see which way they went when I lost sight of them, I never saw either of them before, I should know the tall man again if I was to see him he was a slender man about five feet nine or ten inches high  I was not near enough to see his Eyes or the Colour of his Hair he had round features, he had no jacket on he was in his shirt sleeves and had a waistcoat and Trowsers the colour of which I do not know he wore a good black hat, the short man wore a…

P151

Blue jacket and dark coluored trowsers and a red cap turned inside out his face was blackened, the tall mans face was not blackened I am sure they were within twelve of fifteen yards of us when they fred at us neither Barrett or I was hit by the shot they fired, we did not go down to the Boat until after Dark when they disappeared it was between three and four o clock, it is about four Miles from Barrett’s House to Captain Townsend’s House neither of the men had a knapsack Barrett started from his House about eight  o’ clock and said he was going to report what had happened at George Town Barrett and I did not go after those men we stopped to guard the House until after the Boat was gone the Boat shed is about seven Hundred Yards from Barrett’s House and cannot be seen from it Barrett has two Dogs they barked two hours or two hours and a half after the en were gone Barrett and I went out to see what they were barking at but could see no one. Barrett did not return home until one o clock the next day I was in the House all night with Mrs Barrett and her children we did not go to bed until between twelve and one o clock we were not disturbed during the night – I had only one musket in the House, I dare say the men were in sight of Barrett and me for an hour they stood on the top of the Hill opposite the Bridge during

P152

Which time Barrett guarded the Fruit we had taken down to the Beach and I wheeled up the fruit again to the House I went three times from the Beach to the House whilst the men were on the Hill they said nothing to me the Fruit was four or five hundred yards from the House I took my musket with me backwards and forwards as I wheeled up the fruit Barrett had only one Gun with him whilst he was guarding the Fruit and he knew the men were on the Hill all the time I think they were a quarter of a mile from the place where Barrett was guarding the fruit whilst on  the top of the hill, the men might have got to Barrett’s House whilst I was busy with him about the Fruit if we had lost sight of them, they kept in the same place for an house, neither Barrett or I fired at the Men.

/signed/ Joseph X White

his mark

Taken before me at Launceston the eleventh day of June 1829

/signed/ PA Mulgrave

p153

The examination on oath of Joseph White was saith I recollect the day on which two men came to Henry Barrett’s premises and fired at Barrett and me one of them was a tall man and the other was a short man I have described them in a former information I should know the tall man again if I was to see him I should not know the short man I think it was on the 8th of June I was not at Henry Barrett’s House when it was robbed before I am sure neither Bernard Cosgrove or John Cairns were of the men who fired at me and Barrett one the 8th of June.

/signed/ Joseph X White

his mark

Sworn before me at Launcesotn the 22ndday of July 1829

/signed/ JC Simpson

The examination on oath of William Adams /free/ who saith I know John Cairns within  a quarter of a mile of him I recollect seeing John Cairns on Whitsun Monday the day before Sunday

P154

Was a holiday and we kept it I saw him at his own farm about nine o clock and I saw him again in the evening in his House within about an hour or sundown I recollect that Monday because we kept the day before as a holiday I never sw John Cairns wear a Black waistcoat I never saw him have a double barreled Gun I have seen him have a musket it was an old one only half stocked I have fired out of it two or three times I should know it again if I was to see it

/signed/  William Davis

his x mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twenty second day of July 1820

/signed/ JC Simpson

The examination  on oath of  Mary Morgan who saith I am the wife of George Morgan and reside in Launceston, I know Mary Barrett  she was at my House on the first Sunday after the races, I think in last April, she came there in the morning about Breakfast time, John Cairns and Bernard

P155

Cosgrove were at my House at the same time, I saw Mrs Barrett about three weeks or a month after that, it might be more but it was the first time she came up to Launceston after the Races she said she had been robbed, she asked me who the tall man was she had seen in my House with Cosgrove, on the Sunday morning after the Raves, I told her his name was John Cairns and I believe I told her he lived over the water, I cannot recollect that I told her he rented a Farm of David Williams.

/signed/ Mary X Morgan

her mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the second day of July 1829 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of Bernard Cosgrove and John Cairns

/signed/ JC Simpson

The examination on oath of Absolom Harris who saith I am a convict and have charge of the Government Garden at York Town, Henry Barrett also lives there, on a Tuesday about eight

P156

Weeks ago two armed me came to Barrett’s House and robbed it of several articles, amongst them was a musket which I should know again, and I should know the two men again if I were to see them, one of them was about five feet ten inches high, three and twenty years old, full faced, with small whiskers, he was very fair in the face, I think I had seen him before but I cannot recollect  when or where, the other man was a stoutish thick man his face was blackened he was about five feet five inches I took him to be about thirty years old they came to the House about two o clock and went away at dusk I talked a good deal to the tall man, and I saw them both very frequently during the time they were at Barrett’s House.

I was in George Town on Monday the 8th of June and when I returned home I understood from Barrett that the same two men who had robbed his house on the Tuesday had fired at him and Joseph White on that day /Monday/

I have now seen five men

P157

In the Police Office and I am sure neither of them were of the men who robbed Barrett’s house as I have before stated the man who had his face blackened had a roman nose, a crooked nose, he was a good deal stouter and thicker than this man /Bernard Cosgrove/ the man perspired a good deal and the black was rubbed off about his chin and the side of his face his whiskers and Beard were of a sandy colour I am sure this is the musket that was stolen from Barrett’s House on the Tuesday as mentioned in the Examination.

/signed/ Absolom X Harris

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston ths ninth day of July 1829

/sgd/ JC Simpson

The further examination on oath of Absolom Harris who saith neither of these men /John Cairns Bernard Cosgrove/ are of the men who robbed Barrett’s House on the Tuesday mentioned in my information I never saw either of these men before.

/signed/ Absolom X Harris

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 9th day of July 1829

/signed/ JC Simpson

p158

The examination on oath of Henry Brown free by servitude who saith I recollect seeing John Cairns on Whitsun Monday the 8th of June it was a day of pleasure and I drank some Beer with him on that day between nine and eleven o clock I was with him in his House at that time I left him there and went up  the  country there was some heaps of wood burning on his farm on that day and I supposed he had been at work burning off timber I have had no conversation with any one about what evidence I was to give in this case.

/signed/ Henry X Brown

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twenty second day of July 1829

/sg/ JC Simpson

The examination on oath of Phillip Best free by servitude who saith I know Bernard Cosgrove he was working as a Sawyer with me about three miles from Launceston from the middle of may until the middle of June he

P159

Was never about from his work at that place a ay and a night during that time on Whit Sunday he went out and dined he came back about an house before sun down he was not absent on the next day Monday

/signed/ Phillip Best

Sworn before me at Launceston ths twenty second day of July  1829

/sgd/ JC Simpson

The examination on oath of James Eaton who saith I know Bernard Cosgrove he worked at the same plece that I did from the middle of May until the middle of lat June I do not recollect that he ever slept a night away from that place I recollect Whitmonday he asked me for some Money I had none and he was at work with me to whole of that day It was within three miles of Launceston near Mr/?/s Townsend’s where we were at work on Whit  Monday.

/s/ James Eaton

his X  mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 22nd day of July 1829

/sg/ HC Simpson

p160

22nd July 1829

Rex versus

John Cairns

Bernard Cosgrove

Original forwarded

1st march 1830

Tried at the June sessions 1830

[bushrangers in pencil]

p161

[sept 1829 in blue wax? Pencil]

Van Diemen’s land

To Wit

The information on oath of Donald McLeod Esquire Settler of Claggen taken then 17th day of September 1829 who deposeth and saith. Between one and two o clock in the morning of the 24th of August last, I was awoke by my son Alexander who called out “here are the bushrangers come” , and immediately afterwards a short was fired an I heard the rattling of shot through the House I called out to my sons to prepare themselves incase they / the bushranger/ should break open the door, on opening a little leap? Place I had made in the window shutters, I saw the flash of a Gun about fifty yards from the House, and the shot instantly struck the weather boarding of the House, the firing was continuous for some time I have no doubt there were twenty shots fired before I heard any voice after some time had elapsed I went to a skilling at the back part

P162

of the House when I heard the voice of John Morton and William Sainter call to William Ward who slept in the Kitchen calling to him to get up from the place where I was I could not see them, but I am positive it was Morton and Sainter, I went to my bedroom when I heard Stewart calling out it will be as well for you to open the door, while I was at the back part of the house I heard a gun fired and a Ball struck against a post close to my son, the Ball passed through my Bed room close to the head of my Bed, they were about the house upwards of two hours, I never spoke to them nor suffered any Person in the House to speak, after all had been quiet for some time my servants same from the kitchen to the front of my House and told me the Bushrangers have gone and had taken William Ward

P163

Along with them, I never saw Ward until the day following about two o clock, when I was going to Mr Cox’s to report the circumstance.

I heard Morton ay “we want nothing but rations and rations we will have”, – there are several holes that have been pierced by Balls in Mrs McLeods bedroom, close to the head of the bed, and there are two or three Balls sticking in the woodwork near the bed I believe there are twenty holes in the side and  end of the House which have been made by the Balls, I picked up several of the Balls, and being short of ammunition we melted them down to fit our own guns.

/signed/ D MCLeod

Sworn before me at Launceston the 17th day of September 1829

/signed/ Jmes Gordon

£40  [left margin]

p164

Launceston

13th October 1829

The information on oath of Mr Alexander McLeod one of the sons of Donald McLeod Esquire of Cleggin who saith on the night of the 23rd of August last about midnight I was awoke by a shot being fired and a Ball passing through the weather boards of the House through the Bed Curtains and fell upon the Bed and not distinctly hearing what it was that made the noise, I sat up in my bed and heard another shot fired I then got up and alarmed my father and immediately afterwards I heard a number of voices calling out to open the door, I made no reply neither did any persons who was in the house speak to them, after that several shots were fired, a little time after this, I heard Thomas Loughton’s voice at the end of the House calling

P165

To me to open the door or he would slaughter us all, there was a man also who used to go by the name of Pincher, Samuel Cowden, was his right name, I heard him call out here is little Pincher come he will pinch some of you or else he will be shot dead before he goes away, after this I went to the end of the House, and looking our through a loophole towards the stable I saw a man which I thought at first was a stump when I perceived it was a man I heard John Morton call out if you do no let us into the House I will take the Horses out of the stable and shoot them in a few minutes, I saw Morton close by a tree, about fifty yards from the House, I heard him call out come out you old rascal and fight like a man, and instantly I saw the

P166

Flash of a Gun fired from the tree, I did not see any other person near the tree but one an that I am sure was Morton from his voice, the Ball came through the weather boarding of the front room and fell down and rolled along the boards I shortly after heard William Stewart call out you had better open the door, it will be better for you, every time that they spoke to us they fired, I dare say they fired thirty shots at the House they stopped upwards of two hours, they never got into the House neither do I know that they took anything,  away from the premises

/siged/ Alexr McLeod

Sworn before me /signed/ James Gordon

P167

Van Diemen’s land

To Wit

The information on oath of Stephen Hopwood who deposeth and saith, I am assigned to the service of Donald McLeod Esquire of Cleggin, Between eleven and twelve o clock on the night of Sunday the 23d of August last I was in bed and awoke by the report of a Gun, I arose and heard a voice call out “open the door and let us in we won’t hurt any of you if you will let u s in, if not we will have no mercy on you”, immediately after I heard several shots between twenty and thirty, the firing had ceased about a quarter of an hour when some one called out repeatedly “Hopwood come out”, I hesitated, but at length went out and aw John Morton, William Stewart, John Laughton, Samuel Cowden and William Sainter, Morton said come here I won’t hurt you, you must

P168

Walk before us up to the Majors door, I told him I could not do so, he forced me to walk with them round the House and asked me where Ward was I told him I did not know, he went to the back of the chimney and broke it down and called for Ward whom came our at the Kitchen door they forced him to say to me that he agreed to go in the Back with them, Morton tied my Hands behind me, all but Sainter then went into the skilling were I slept, they took away one pair of drab cloth trowsers, one Black kerseymere waistcoat, two silk handkerchiefs, one Black Beaver Hat and one Razor, all my property, they then went away and locked me in the skilling – they remained upon the premises until about four o clock the next morning, they were all armed with fowling pieces and muskets, the wearing apparel which they took was locked up in

P169

A chest, Morton attempted to break it open, but I told him not to do that as I had got the key and unlocked it and took the things out, Ward was in the skilling at the tie, they also took a Black beaver hat, belonging to Master Norman McLeod, Stewart took it away, – when they left the House Ward went with them, I did not see ny of them fire

/siged/ Stephen Hopwood

Sworn before me at Launceston this 23d day of October 1829

Signed James Gordon

P170

Launceston

October 14 1829

The information on oath of Donald Cameron who saith I reside in the district of Launceston, on the night of the first of September I was awoke by the barking of Dogs I immediately got up when I heard the voice of one man who said I am Morton the Bushranger, but I am not some to rob you or do you the slightest injury, I heard the footsteps of more than one person as they approached the house, the person outside said get a light and repeated that he did not men to do me any injury, a light was accordingly procured and one man entered the room through the window, it is a French window  and opens down to the ground, he was armed with a double barreled gun and a brace of pistols, I recognized him to be one of the men who robbed my House about a month before he

P171

Said Doctor Cameron we have learned that you have represented our conduct favourably to the Lieutenant Governor and we are desirous of expressing our sense of feeling for your having done so, at this time I observed behind me another of the Bushrangers with a double barreled Gun in his hand and a free man of the name of Antonio in my employ, the man and Antonio had entered ther  by the back door the man who came in first at the window his name was John Morton and who was immediately in front of me knelt down and took his pistols out of his shooting jacket pockets placed them on the table, put his Gun against the table, put his hands behind his back and said if you think I came with any intentions of robbing you again you can blow our my brains I said no I could not , he then got up, and assumed his men and

P172

I urged him to throw himself on the Mercy of the Lieutenant Governor. I think a man who could show himself so feelingly could not be very depraved, he said he had never robbed major McLeod in his life, only once and that was six cheeses, that starvation and ill treatment was the cause of their taking the Bush and that if Mercy was extended to them, they would immediately give themselves up, I said I should go into Town early in the morning and make that communication to the Authorities, I asked them how they would find out supposing my application was successful Morton said make it known to two are these persons and we shall hear of it, I urged them not to make any further robbery until they could hear of the verdict, asking them if they had sufficient provisions to last the least of the two said they had sufficient four and sugar

P173

Adding that they would rather starve than commit a fresh robbery, they said it was a dreadful lie they led in the Bush, that they had many miles to travel before they came to their place of concealment, and that they then had to Crawl to the Place of concealment through long grass and were not even able to keep a fire for fear of detection. I then ordered them to get some bread and cheese and some spirits which they took away with them immediately, I never saw either of these two men to my knowledge unless on the Night of the robbery

/signed/ D.Cameron

Taken before me at Launceston this fourteenth day of October 1829

/signed/ James Gordon

p174

The information of James Murray who deposeth and saith I was one of he men who apprehended a party of Bushrangers on Mr Thomas’s farm on the second instant I returned to the place where they were found on last Wednesday the ninth instant, Robert Caldwell was with me where we found an old Duck frock with some damper in it and a small pistol and copper powder flask, I have put a mark upon them and delivered them this day to Mr Dell the District Constable.

/signed/ James Murray

his x mark

ea

Sworn before me at Launceston the 11th of September 1829

/signed/ James Gordon

p175

Van Diemens’ land

To Wit

The information of Mr Robert Pringle Stuart of Talisker in Van Diemen’s land settler taken upon oath the eighth day of September 1829 who deposeth and saith, I am in partnership with my brother George Stuart and reside at Talisker, on the night of the 31st of August about ten o clock our dwelling house was entered by five men, they were armed, they tied my Hands behind me, I knew them well, they were John Morton, William Sainter, Thomas Laughton, William Stuart and Samuel Cowden, they had been servants on our farm and had absconded therefrom Cowden tied my hands after they had been in the house a short time, Morton untied my hands and taking a light made me go with him, Laughton accompanied us we went up into a loft, he /Morton/ made me go up before him Lawton? Went up with us, finding there were Tea and Sugar on the loft, they then went into a Bed room and took some Pillow cases and returned to the loft they

P176

Took about five or six pounds of tea, and twenty pounds of sugar, about two pound of salt and a small quantity of shot then filed two tin pots with wine, and took those things into the parlour, where I saw them take some shirts, Morton then took me to a Bed room where he rummaged my Brother George’s Trunks, I do now recollect that he took anything from them, he then took me into Mr McLeod’s room and asked me for the key of a portmanteau I told him I had not got the key and on finding a hole at the end of the portmanteau he pulled some things out of it but did not take them away, in returning from Mr Mc Leod’s Bedroom we again went into My Brother’s Room where Lawton took a pair of old trowsers, Cowden shortly afterwards went into my Brother’s Room where he also took a pair of Trowsers belonging to my Brother. They remained at the House nearly four hours and a half, John Morton requested us to take some wine, he took up a pot with some wine in it and said to us, Gentlemen God Bless you all, I wish you prosperity and turning

P177

To the men who were tied, he said Fellow Prisoners I hope your luck in the Colony will be better than our and he then rank, when they were going away they tied up the things I have enumerated and several other articles which I do not recollect this double barreled Fun is my property and was taken away by Morton and his party – this pair of Boots, this cotton shirt, and this shooting jacket {Lawton} are my property. This white cotton shirt is mine {John Morton}

/signed/ Robert Pringle Stuart

Sworn before me at Launceston this day and year first before written

/signed/ James Gordon

£40.-19 Sept 1829

p178

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information and complaint on oath of Mr Magnus McLeod one of the sons of Donald McLeod who saith I live at my Father’s Farm at Talisker, last night as I was returning home about eight o clock, I was stopped by John Morton, William Sainter, Samuel Cowden and William Stewart, they were all armed and had absconded from my Father’s service about five weeks ago, they tied up my hands behind me and took me to the men’s Hut where I saw the men belonging to the farm, they had all their hands tied and Thomas Lawton who had also absconded with the other Bushrangers was standing as a sentinel at the hut door, Mr John? Stewart  Was with me and the treated him in like manner, they kept us in the Hut about two hours and then tied Mr Stewart and I together

P179

And marched us up to the House, the insisted on my requesting the House door to be opened and I did so through fear they threatened to shoot me, Samuel Cowden said it they will not open the door I have a pretty good target before me I said what is that he said “Your dead”, the door was opened by Mr George Stewart just before they entered he House, and then called Mr Robert Stewart to them and bound him also, I saw Cowden take a double barreled Gun belonging to Mr George Stewart and another double barreled Gun belonging to Mr Robert Stewart and Camden also took a pair of Pistols belonging to Mr George Stewart and handed the Guns to one of his party, they took a shooting jacket from Mr George Stewart’s person, Sainter took a pair

P180

Of boots from me, he asked me for them, and I delivered them to him, Morton desired him to take them, they ransacked the House and took away several Bundles of things from the House, Morton said if we catch Ward we will not shoot him we will cut his ears off – when they took me and Mr Stewart  to the House they marched all the men from the Hut likewise and put them into the parlour with us, the Hut stands about a quarter of a mile from the House, they went away about two o clock in the morning. I could not learn from any of their conversations what they intended to do, they threatened to storm some persons Castle but did not mention the name, I thought they alluded to Mr Lette’s House when hey used this threat.

Signed M.McLeod

Sworn before me at Launceston the 1st Sept 1829

/signed/ James Gordon

£40  19 Sept 1829 [in left margin]

p181

Island of Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information of Robert Chawner of the district of Breadalbane in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath the second day of September 1829 who deposeth and saith yesterday morning about 2 o clock I was awoke by some person calling to me to get up, I was in bed over a blacksmith’s shop belonging to Samuel Bowen with whom I live I got up and saw five men standing in the shop they were all armed, they had been fellow servants of mine at Major McLeod’s they were John Morton, Samuel Cowden William Sainter, Thomas Lawton and a man named Stewart. John Morton took a small piece of Bacon that was hanging up in the House and one of them took a loaf of Bread I do not know which, they stopped there about ten minutes when they all went out of the Shop and Morton

P182

Called me out of the shop and said you must carry this pointing to a Bundle that was laying upon the Ground and go with us, I took up the Bundle it was a bag or pillow case, it contained about sixty pounds of sugar, they took to the Black Forest towards Mr Cottrells where they stopped, it had then been daylight about half an hour, I was then about seven miles from home we walked very slow, I do not thing we travelled in a straight direction they told me to sit down and take something to eat, I did so, they then said I might go home, I think I was with them five  hours, they all of them said they were sorry for what they had done, and were ready to give up their arms if they thought their lives would be spared, I left them all sitting on the ground, I never was in that Forrest before I do not know how far they then were from Mr Cottrells, I saw no Hut near the place, I did not hear any one of them threaten to rob or otherwise injure any person, they had several bundles with them, I do not know what they contained they

P183

Had two double barreled Guns and three single barreled ones. I do not know how much ammunition they had.

/signed/ Robert Chawner

his x mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 2nd day of Sept 1829

Signed/ James Gordon

P184

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information on oath of James Murray who saith I am free by servitude and employed as a labourer on the farm of Jocelyn Thomas Esquire at the Snake banks about twenty miles from Launceston about twelve o clock on last Wednesday the second of September instant I saw five armed men going across a plain near my Hut towards a Forest, I told Robert Caldwell – who lives with me that I had seen these men and that I would go and see who they were I went to the Forest intending to conceal myself, when they had got within about two hundred yards of the place where I was they ran back across the marsh plain, I ran to the Hut took my musket

And Bayonet and went in pursuit of the five men and told Caldwell to go to Mr Wedge’s about a mile distant and get Ashton

P185

A constable, I followed to men and saw them go to the edge of the South Esk River, they went into a scrub in a bend of the river, and laid down about two hours afterwards I was joined by Caldwell and John Ashton we approached the scrub until I saw a man laying down upon the ground, I was within five or six yards to him, I made a motion to Ashton, to close into the scrub when he presented his piece and Caldwell and I presented our Guns also Ashton said come walk out one by one, when five men one after the other walked out of the scrub one of them picked up a Gun and Presented it at me, I said some drop your piece or I will blow your brains out, he replied if you   fire I will fire, I presented my Gun at him and said if you do not drop your piece I will drive a ball through you he immediately laid down his Gun and

P186

Walked out of the scrub, the other four men did not take their Guns from the ground I think they were all asleep when we approached them it was then about four o clock in the afternoon, one of them the tallest of the five pulled upon the breast of his shirt and said shoot me, the other four said aye we may as well all die together. I took a double barreled piece from the ground where the men had been and Ashton and Colwell each took a Gun from the same place and took the men to Mr Wedge’s Farm, where the Bushrangers were kept in Ashtons Hut all night, in the morning Caldwell and I returned to the scrub and brought from there two muskets and a fowling piece, and I accompanied the five bushrangers and the fire arms found with them to the Police Office this day, they are John Morton, William Sainter, William Stewart, Thomas Lawton, and Samuel Cowden, who I have heard absconded from the service of major McLeod right on nine weeks ago, neither of them made the least resistance or attempted to

P187

Get away from us except the man who lifted up the Gun and he ade no other resistance than that I have stated, I did not see any provisions with either of the Bushrangers excepts a little sugar about nine pounds.

/signed/ James Murray

Sworn before me at Launceston the fourth day of September 1829

/signed/ James Gordon

p188

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information of William Ward of Launceston a field police constable taken upon oath the fourth day of September 1829 who deposeth and saith on Sunday the nineteenth day of last July I was an assigned servant to Mr Donald McLeod and resided at his farm called Claggen when about the middle of the night John Morton, Thomas Lawton, William Sainter, William Stewart and Samuel Cowden my fellow servants, and employed at my master’s farm called Tallisker came to Cleggin and robbed the House of some firearms and some ammunition they took a musket a Rifle a Brace of Pistols and  fowling piece  and forced me to accompany then into the Bush about ten o clock the next day, I escaped from them and they were going through a scrub, and returned home with the Rifle, and one of the Pistols which they had permitted me to carry, on Sunday night the 23d of August

P189

Or early in the morning I was distracted by the same five men coming to my Hut at Cleggin when they made me get up and go away with them, before they came to my hut I was alarmed by hearing about twenty shots fired when they called me out of the Hut they forced me to go with them previous to starting, they made me acknowledge in the presence of Stephen Hopwood that I was willing to go with them, they took me into the Bush about twenty miles from Cleggin and I escaped from them again about the idle of the next night /Monday when they were asleep, and I then brought away a fowling piece and a pistol both of which I had seen in the possession of John Morton, I returned home to Cleggan and came to Launceston the day after, and delivered the fowling piece to Mr Mulgrave, the pistol I delivered to Mr Donald McLeod before I came to Launceston – whilst I was with the Bushrangers I heard them talking about firing sixty rounds at Major McLeod’s House I

P190

Cannot recollect which of them it was that said this, they talked about it aongst themselves.

/signed/ William Ward

Sworn before me at Launceston the day and year first above written

/signed/ James Gordon

p191

The information on oath of John Ashton who saith I am a Field Police Constable attached to the Police at Camobell Town on last Wednesday the 2nd of September I was on the farm of Mr Wedge at the South Esk River when Robert Caldwell who holds a Ticket of Leave told me he had seen five armed men which he thought had absconded from Mr Mc Leod’s go across a Scrub near his Hut, Mr Wedge gave Caldwell a musket and some ammunition, I took my musket and went with Mr Wedge and Caldwell, Mr Wedge was on horseback, after we separated, we had travelled about the swamp for about an house and then fell in with James Murray, about a quarter of a mile from the scrub he informed us he had last sight of the Bushrangers about twenty minutes before I saw Murray, I saw William Foreman, Mr Cox’s shepherd, he was on the other side of the river, he called to Caldwell, and told him the Bushrangers were in Mr Coxes Bend we went to a bend of the South Esk River, where there was

P192

A scrub and saw five men laying there asleep, I called out to them and aid who are you, Caldwell Murray and I had our Guns pointed towards them, one of them I think Stewart said do not shoot us, I said get up and walk away from that place, he got up and directly afterwards the other four got up and walked out of the scrub I had said if you do not come out we will blow your brains out one of them said do not do that for we will comply, I said do so and we will treat you well, Caldwell and Murray stood over them with their pieces and I went to the place where they had lain and took from there two double barreled Guns two muskets and a fowling piece which we planted about a hundred yards from the place I had found them, I then searched the Bushrangers and took from John Morton a small pistol a pouch containing about twenty rounds of ammunition a

P193

Pair of Bullet moulds and two pieces of films/files?, I did not find anything  upon the other four men we took the five men to a Hut near Mr Wedge’s House and the next morning we took the men to Captain Barclay’s farm and from thence to Launceston this day – neither of the men made any resistance at the tine they were apprehended or attempted to ascape afterwards, these are the five stand of arms we found with the Bushrangers.

/signed/ John Ashton

Sworn before me at Launceston the fourth day of September 1829

/signed/ James Gordon

p194 [repeat of p 174]

The information on oath of James Murray who deposeth and saith I was one of the men who apprehended a party of Bushrangers on Mr Thomas’s farm on the second instant, I returned to the pale where they were found on last Wednesday, the 9th instant   Robert Caldwell  was with me whenwe found an old duck frock with some damper in it   and a small pistol and copper powder flask, I have put my mark upon them and delivered them this day to Mr Dell the District Constable.

/signed/ James Murray

his x mark

Sworn before me at Laucneston the 11th day of September 1829

[unsigned]

p195

Van Diemen’s Land

To wit

The examination of Mr George Henning Stuart of Talisker, settler, taken upon oath the eighth day of Septembeer 1829 who deposeth and saith, I and my brother Robert rent the farm from Major McLeod which we hold of lease for a certain number of years unexpired. Mr Magnus LcLeod is a partner of ours but his name is not mentioned in the lease, between nine and ten o clock on Monday night the 31st of August, I heard a person calling out to open the front door of my House. I knew it was Mr Magnus McLeod I opened the door, it was very dark and I could not scarcely distinguish any thing, I heard a voice which I knew to be that of John Morton say “come out here Mr George Stuart and hold up your hands”, and Samuel Cowden came up to me and ordered me to give him my handkerchief I offered  to go into the room to fetch my handkerchief but they would not suffer me, Cowden said he

P196

Would find something to tie mewith and then William Sainter placed himself between me and the door when Cowden tied my hands he /Cowden/ gave his Gun to Sainter while he tied my hands they then called to my brother Robert to come out, they made him produce his handkerchief and tied his hands, they then made me go into the parlour and brought in both my Brother and Mr Magnus McLeod and all the servants from the hut whom I found they had secured Morton then ordered my brother Robert’s hand

[incomplete]

p197

October 1829

Copies of information

Vs

John Morton 7 others

[‘bushrangers’ in pencil]

p198

[oct 1829 – in blue wax pencil]

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Be it remembered that on the twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty nine at Launceston in the said island of Van Diemen’s Land cometh before me James Gordon Esquire one of His Majesty’s Justices of the peace for the said Island and its Dependencies Patricius William Welsh  in his own proper person and giveth me the said Justice to understand and he informed that Thomas Foster of Launceston Brickmaker did on Saturday the seventeenth of October instant harbour suffer to be and remain in his dwelling house in Launceston aforesaid Thomas Mehan [Meehan?] a convict assigned to the service of Patrick Carlin the said convict being then an absenter from his said muster service whereby the said Thomas Foster hath become liable to forfeit and pay a fine of fifty Spanish dollars according to the form of the act of Council passed on the 19th January 1825 whereupon the said Patricius William Welsh prays that they said Thomas Foster may be summoned to answer to this information and make his defence thereto.

PW Welsh [signed]

Exhibited and Taken the day and year above mentioned

James Gordon [signed]

P199

Patricius William Welsh

Harbouring a convict on the 17th Oct 1829

Decided 31st Octr 1829

Mr Walsh

Constable Henderson

Constable Gardiner

P200

[dec 1829 – in pencil]

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Be it remembered that on the sixteenth day of December in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty nine at Launceston in the said island of Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies cometh before me William Lyttleton Esquire one of His Majestys Justices of the peace for the said Island and its Dependencies. Thomas Johnson in his own proper person and giveth me the said Justice to understand and be informed that a James Houghton of Launceston Licenced Publican on Saturday the fifth day of December instant between nine and ten o clock at night did in His Licenced Public House situate in Launceston aforesaid permit John Davis a convict to be and remain therein for the purpose of tippling whereby the said James Houghton hath become liable to forfeit and pay a fine of twenty Spanish dollars according to the form of the act in Council passed on the 19 January 1825 whereupon the said Thomas Johnson prays that the said James Hougton may be summond to answer to this information and make His defence thereto

Sined by Thomas Johnson

Exhibited and Taken the day and Year

Above written – sined W Lyttleton

P201

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Be it remember that on the twenty first day of December 1829 James Houghton of Launceston Publican was duly convicted before Mr Lyttleton and William Kenworthy Esquires two of His majesty’s Justices of the Peace upon an information charging him with having on the fifth of December instant suffered and permitted John Davis a convict to be and remain in His Public House in Launceston aforesaid for the purpose of Tipling against the form and effect of the Act in Council intitled an act to prevent the harbouring of Runaway convicts and the Encouraging of Convicts Tippling and gambling and the said Justices did award that the said James Houghton should for the said offence forfeit and pay the penalty or sum of Ten Spanish Dollars besides the Costs of the prosecution which costs have been assesd at the sum of Thirteen shillings and six pence.

Given under our hands and seals at Launceston the day and year above written

P202

John Dunlop sworn saith I am watch house keeper in Launceston about half past nine o clock Saturday fortnight I saw John Davis in Mr Houghton’s Public House he was at a Table where there was a good many people Drinking. I did not see him Drinking. I do not know if he was sitting down there was drink on the Table after we the constables went in he Davis went off immediately I found him in the street afterwards In about an Hour and took him into custody Davis is a Prisoner in the Public Works he had no right to be in a Public House at so late an hour of the night it was half past  nine according to the time of night I did not speak to Davis I was the Hendermost of the constables Davis was a Coxswain I do not know if he had been down the River I did not see him drink anything I could not say he was Sober or Drunk I thought he was in Liquor.

Robert Fleming sworn saith I am a Constable I saw Davis in Mr Houghton’s about half past nine o clock on the 5th of this month he was in the Tap Room near the back door at one of the tables intermost? amongst some other people I know my Houghton’s waiter?  Davis did not speak to him or Mr Houghton to my knowledge he had no right to be there at that time of night there was Drink

P203

On the table I did not see him Drink any thing I know it was him, this is the man, I went in at the front door with the night watch, I was about the second of them, I saw the man full in the face, I do not know if David was drunk or sober, he is employed in the Boates, I do not know if he had some up the River on that night

Constable James Fahey sworn saith I know John Davis he s employed in the Boates, I know he went away to George Town about a fortnight ago he came up to the wharf  in a Boat about eight o clock on last Saturday week in Mr Kenworthy’s Boat.

Samuel James free sworn saith  I know John Davis he was not in Mr Houghton’s Tap Room on the last Saturday Fortnight I did not serve him with any liquor. If I had seen him in the House I should have ordered him out if it was after eight o clock, I did not see him Drink with any body in the Tap Room that night, I have seen Davis some through the Tap Room for Mater? He lodged opposite to Mr Houghtons.

P204

5 December 1829

Johnson vs James Houghton

Harbouring John Davis a convict

Decided the 21st 1829

P205

Gaol Launceston

23 Jany 1830

The information on oath of Thomas Templeton a prisoner confined in Gaol who saith yesterday the 22nd instant the Bread was late in coming and I went into my ward without breakfast I went? With a shoemaker who is a wardsman. I had some tea which was taken away from me. I expostulated with Greenaway who took away the tea when Greenaway struck me on the head I got up to call the under gaoler when I was followed by Greenaway who threatened me if I called out or complained and said he would give me something if I offered to make us of his name – I then reported the circumstance to the undergaoler.

When Greenaway was confind in a cell by himself I was then locked up in a room with the rest of the prisoners when they dragged me out by my feet ad beat me severely with straps and buckles at the end of them when I was taken out by the gaoler some hours

P206

Before this took place I was threatened by a man named Patrick alias John Dunn who told me if I offered to touch the door or give the alarm he would tear me at the arms? I was reporting the circumstance Edisand? And Wise  called out to me and said he would tear my others leg out if I did not mind what I was about.

Thomas Templeton (signed well)

Sworn before me at the Gaol Launceston this 23 January 1830 Joseph Greenaway

Edward Wise/Wine [7 Lady east]  [margin: Edwin Wise per Lady East 7]

Patrick alias John Dunne [Godfrey  ]  14 years

Charged with threatening Language and thereby inducing the rest of the prisoners to ill treat Thomas Templeton, a prisoner confined in Gaol

Ile? Not Guilty

The above deposition of Thos Templetone being read he confirmed the same.

The information on oath of Prisoner Timothy  Daley of the 57th Regt who saith I heard Edward Wise yesterday when

P207

I was on sentry at the Gaol about 4 o clock say he would have the other leg pulled out of Templeton’s ass.

Joseph Greenaway 50 lashe

Edward Wise 30 lashes at the intercession of W Pastley?/Dartly?

The punishment against Dunne and Greenaway suspended

Samuel Chandler Countess of Harcourt  Life charged with being turbulent and disorderly conduct and aiding the prisoners in creating a disturbance in the Gaol also with making use of abusive language to the Sergeant of the Guard the morning 23 Day January.

Sergeant Thomas Joyce states he was called by the under Jailer Thurs? morng to assist in confining some prisoners for being disorderly

P208

In doing so the prisoner Samuel Chandler called me a damned Duffer and told me to f_  _  k myself, Owen Durrows made use of similar language towards me. He is a free man I am certain it was Chandler who made use of the language towards me. Wm Beasely [Beasley?] under jailor sworn saith this morng there was a disturbance amongst the prisoners when I called Sergeant Joyce to assist me in confining Samuel Chandler who was the ring leader of a disturbance last night clapping his hands and asking the rest of the prisoners if they was ready, they kept up a most disorderly and tumultuous noise from nine a night until 2 o clock this morning Samuel Chandler was confined in a cell for endeavouring to Break Out of the Gaol.

Sworn before me at the Gaol Launceston this 23 January 1830

P209

[23 Jan 1830]

Corporal William Garbell? Of the 57th Regt sworn saith I was on duty at the Gaol last night. Chandler was keeping a great noise the whole of the night. I heard him abuse the Sentry and call him  a pipe clay B _____ r/y.  I am certain it was Chandler by his voice having been on duty some length of time at the Gaol

Chandler to receive fifty lashes.

Michael Welsh Coromandel Life

Charged with Riotous conduct in the Gaol on 23 Jany

Plea Not Guilty

Corporal William Garbell?/Garbett? Sworn saith about half past two o clock in the morning of the 23d instant I heard the prisoner advise the rest of the prisoners who was keeping a great noise not to leave off till day light as it was then three o clock. I know it was Welsh by his voice I swear it was Welsh.

Sworn before me at the Gaol Launceston this 23rd Jany 1830

P210

The information on oath of Private Isaac Henmerson??  Who saith I know the prisoner I heard him about one o clock say go one go on it is of no use to leave off alluding to some prisoners who was keeping a great noise he said keep it up till the morning or I know I shall be punished in the Mouds??

Sworn before me at the Gaol Launceston this 23d January 1830

Michael Welsh in his defence states I was confined in Gaol right back? Upon my first arrival without receiving any rations or comunulation? Money?

Twenty Five lashes

P211 [thin piece of paper c12 cm h x c 21 cm w]

6=0=0

Launceston Augt 28th 1830

I promise to pay Mr Mackie on demand on account of Alexander Hudson the sum of six pounds stirling witness my hand this twenty sixth day of Augt 1830

Jos Moore  [very uncertain hand]

Witness John Kendle?/Rendall?

His x Mark

P212

ISLAND OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

The examination of Mr Charles Bennett of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me, one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Vn Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, the seventh Day of September in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty in the presence and hearing of Alexander Hudson, duly charged before me upon oath

Which said deponent on his oath, deposeth and saith as follows

I have kept the Tap of the Cornwall Hotel in Launceston for Mr William Mackie since the twenty third day of August last the Liquor sold in that Tap are solely for the benefit of Mr William Mackie on the Twenty sixth of August the prisoner Alexander Hudson came to Mr Mackie’s Tap Room a man who called himself John Pearce was with him Hudson said he and Pearce worked for Mr Joseph Moore that they had been fencing? For him Hudson said he owed

P213

Mr Mackie three pounds and that he would give Mr Mackie an order upon Mr Moore for six pounds if he would let him and his partner have to that amount he asked me to make out the order for six pounds and by his instruction I drew up this promissory note for six pounds payable to Mr Mackie on demand after I had written it I delivered it to Alexadner Hudson and told him he must give it signed and witnessed and he left the Tap with it my son George Bennett a youth about twelve years old went with him. Pearce remained in the Tap Room Hudson and my son returned in

P214

In about a quarter of an hour. Hudson said Moore will not sign it. Pearce said give me the note and I wil get it signed and he took the note from Hudson and sat down, Hudson then left the Tap Room and said he should got home Pearce remained in the Tap Room about a quarter of an hour afte Hudson was gone and then he said he should go to Moore and get the note signed and he left the House, and about three hours after he returned and I said to him have you got that note signed he said yes Moore has signed it for me and he handed me the note and he said give us some thing to drink I said no until Mr Mackie accepts the note he said very well send it to him the note if right enough or I should not have brought it to you

Hudson

P215

Was not with him at this time I said are you sure this I Moore’s signature he said yes I said will you witness it he replied yes give me the pen I did so and he made his mark as a witness to the note and he said now give me some drink I said I would not give him any liquor until Mr Mackie approved of the note I took it to Mr Mackie and he requested me to sent it to Mr Moore and I sent the note to Mr Moore by a man named White but fearing Pearce might attempt to get the note from White I sent my son George After White to get the note whilst they were away Pearce said has Mr Mackie accepted the note I said It is gone to Mr Moore he replied it was not Moore who signed

P216

The note it was a person as near to him as his shirt is to his skin, I asked him who it was that had signed the note he refused to tell me White and my son returned and said Moor had detained the note that it was a forgery and soon after I was sent for o the Polie Office where I saw the note and Mr Moore. Hudson did not receive any liquor or other consideration from me or any person on account of Mr Mackie for this note, I never saw Hudson from the time this note was delivered to me with the signature Jos Moore upon it until this morning I am quite sure he was not with Pearce or present when he Pearce delivered me the note with that signature upon it Pearce had a pot of Beer from

P217

Me before the note was signed but nothing after Hudson was nto present at that time nor did he partake of that pot of Beer.

Chas Bennett (signed)

P218

ISLAND OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

The examination of Mr William Mackie of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land Inn keeper, taken upon oath before me,   the seventh Day of September in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty in the presence and hearing of Alexander Hudson, duly charged before me upon oath

Which said deponent on his oath, deposeth and saith as follows

I Keep the Cornwall Hotel in Launceston Charles Bennett keeps my Tap Room  he is my hired servant and is engaged y the year I know the prisoner Alex Hudson he ran a small account with me and gave me his not of hand for three pounds for the payment of that account that note of hand was note paid on the twenty sixth of last August on the forenoon Hudson and a man who I understood was his partner in my Tap Room when Bennett told me that they Hudson and his partner had asked him

P219

To give them more credit and that they had offered to get a note of hand from Joseph Moore as security for their debt to the amount of six pounds if I would allow them to run an account with me to that amount I told Bennett I would accept Moore’s note of Hand for six pounds and when it was placed in my Hands to allow Hudson and his partner to draw property of him to the amount of three pounds which with the note I still held would make six pounds, shortly after this promissory note for six pounds was presented to me if was in the same state then as it is now, I observed that the witness had only made a mark to the note I asked who it was and was

P220

Told it was John Pearce I told Bennett to send the note to Mr Moore to ask if the note was correct and about two hours after I was sent for to the Police Office when Joseph Moore said there the signature Jos Moore to this promissory note was not his signature I am sure this is the same promissory note as was presented to me by Charles Bennett on the twenty sixth day of last August, Alexander Hudson was not present when it was given to me by Bennett but I heard Hudson say he would give me Joseph Moore’s note of hand for six pounds if I would trust him three pounds more than what he then owed me, and I told him I would do so if he could get a note of hand from Joseph Moore for that amount

P221

I only know one Joseph Moore and he is a Butcher residing in Launceston. If this promissory note purporintg to be that of Joseph Moore had been brought bak to me and I had been informed it was Moore’s note I should have deliverd the note I had previously reeived from Hudson to him holding Moore’s note for six pounds, I do not know if Hudson or his partner had any liquor or other property delivered to them in consequece of this note for six pounds.

W Mackie [signed]

P222

ISLAND OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

The examination of Joseph Moore of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land  Butcher taken upon oath before me, one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, the twenty sixth Day of August in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty .

Which said deponent on his oath, deposeth and saith as follows

Alexander Hudson and John Pearce Labourers have been employed splitting and fencing for me during the last two months they have agreed to do a certain quantity of work for me which is not yet completed they have drawn more money and goods of me than the value of the work they have done and they are in my debt three pounds and upwards, between ten and eleven o clock this forenoon Alexander Hudson presented this paper to me, it is a promissory note for six pounds payable to Mr Mackie on demand purporting to be drawn by Joseph Moore and witnessed by John Pearce, when it was presented to me this morning by Hudson the signature of Joseph Moore nor

P223

The mark of John Pearce was upon it the word witness was upon it and it was in the same state if is not except that signature of Joseph Moore and John Pearce, Hudson asked me if I would sign this Bill, he said it would oblige him much and that he would work it out, I refused to sign it as he was in my debt the signature Joseph Moore is not my Signature neither did I authorize any person to draw or sign this Bill with my name of impower any person to draw any Bill payable to Mr Mackie in my name, the signature Jos Moore in this Bill is a forged signature and hath been

P224

Made with intent to defraud me of six pounds sterling I therefore pray that justice may be done

Joseph Moore (signed)

P225

Vn Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The affadavit of John Thompson of Launceston Watch House Keeper who saith, on Monday the thirtieth of August last, John Pearce was confined in the Watch House at Launceston on a charge of forgery, I had occasion  to leave the watch house for a few minutes, I left John Pearce with other prisoners there, Constable Moore was in charge, on my return, I found that John Pearce had effected his escape – I have not since seen him..

JNo Thompson

Take before me at Launceston this 8th September 1830

P226

Decided

Bennett vs Hudson and Pearce

Case of forgery

August 26th 1830

W1

Wk

Esqrs

P227

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of Mrs Agnes Thomson the wife of Mr Archibald Thomson of the Tamar who saith Mr Thomson left home about three o clock on last Sunday after noon the 10th of Jany between eight and nine o clock that eveninig I was sitting alone in the Parlour there was no other person in the House but my baby when I heard the Dogs bark very much and I heard Mrs Lawson’s children screaming in the kitchen I went to the back door and saw a strange man standing in the yard near to the kitchen he had a double barreled Gun in His Hands he was about five feet six inches about twenty years of age and very stout made, fair hair, light blue eyes, pale faced, he wore corderoy trowsers and I think a frock coat I thought he was a native of the colony he desired me to go into the kitchen I did so and saw three of my husband’s men who were tied the stranger stood at the kitchen door with his Gun I asked him to let me go into the House for my child he said he could not and then I saw Samuel Britton the Bushranger come up to the kitchen door he had a double barreled Gun a rifle which was slung over his shoulder and a Dagger by his side

P228

I did not know him until he said hs name was Britton he said I should gointo the House for my child I went into the House he desird me to sit down into the parlour and immediately after John Bevan a bushranger cam in he told me his name was Bevan he was a very tall man he was armed with a double barreled Gun he asked for some wine and brandy I give him some Brandy he took it to the kitchen shilst he was out of he House I put Mr Thomson’s watch which was laying upon a chest of Drawers in the Cradle when he returned he said what a foolish woman you are I saw a watch here just now he compelled me to give it to him he searched the House and collected together the articles mentioned on this list the whole of which he took away. Britton and the stranger came frequently into the House the stranger assisted Bevan in packing up the articles I did not see either of the Robbers present their Guns at any of the persons about the House or hear either of them threaten to do any one a personal injury these remained in the house and about the Premises about four Hours I never saw the strange man before I did not hear him called by any name he appeared more lined?/tired? Than either of his companions. Bevan swore at him and told him to put down His Gun and fill a Bag with the sugar – I do not

P229

Recollect he called him by any particular name they took their plunder into an out house a work shop where they packed it up I did not see them go away I did not see Mr Thomsons Horse in their possession but it was missed from the stable that morning they took away two of Mr Thomson’s assigned servants who had not returned when I left the farm yesterday the 13th instant at 2 o clock I had never seen either of the Robbers before their faces were not disguised I think I could swear to all three of their persons if I was t see them again.

Signed Agnes Thomson

Sworn before me at Launceston this 14th of January 1830

Signed W Lyttleton

The further information on oath of Mrs Agnes Thomson who saith the information which I gave on the 14th of January and which has now been read to me is true the man now present Thomas Ranes? Is the person I alluded to in that information as the strange  man standing in the yard he is the first of the Robbers I saw, he assisted in packing up some Tea and Sugar in the House  do not recollect if it was this man who took the Tea and Sugar out of the House he was armed with a double barreled Gun he stood as a sentinel at the Kitchen door with His Gun and kept Mr Thomson’s servants

[£100 for Rife? – in left margin]

p230

prisoner in the kitchen I did not see him tie any of the servants I did not see them tied he ordered me to go into the kitchen I did not see him take any other property in the House than the Tea and Sugar.

Signed Agnes Thomson

Sworn before me at Launceston the 25th day of February 1830 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of Thomas Rares?

Signed W Lyttleton

The further information on oath of Mrs Agnes Thomson who saith this white collton shirt marked Archd Thomson No 3 is my Husbands roerty it is worth 4 hillings it had been stolen from my Husband’s premises

Signed Agnes Thomson

Sworn before me at Launceston the 10th day of March 1830 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of Thomas Rares?/Roses?

Signed W Lyttleton

The examination of William Fowler who saith I am an assigned servant to Mr Archibald Thomson and live at His Farm on the left bank of the Tamar. I live in a Hut fifty yards from my Master’s House seven or eight  men live with me My Master left home on Sunday afternoon (16th Jany) about half past 8 o clock that evening I was in my Hut with James Morgan, John Minion, William Hillman, Thomas Hall, William Hannah and Joseph Dawson they are all fellow servants except Hillman he is free we had four muskets in the Hut one of them I know was loaded I do not know if any of the other were loaded or not there were two rounds of ammunition  in a pouch hanging on my musket I do not know what other ammunition there was in the Hut we had no Bayonets or pistols I had just come out of the bush where I had been out after my master’s sheep with Dawson and Hall the latter is an acting overseer we were all sitting by the fence I was getting my supper when John Bevan the Bushranger came into the Hut and up to the Bedroom Door facing the fire place he turned his back to the Bedroom door and pointed a fowling piece at us as we sat by the fire and said the first man who stirs I will blow his brains out go up into the corner, the Guns were at a corner of the partition against which Bevan stood we all went into the Corner near the fire place he said to me come here he did not call me by name one of his companions Britton tied my hands he had five men with him they were armed , one of them had two fowling pieces and several pistols that man was Britton I did not know the other Robber I might have seen him before, he was armed with a fowling piece, I had? Tied all our arms behind us – they asked if my Master was at home and how many men there were at the

P231

House, some body, I don’t know whom, told them my master had gone down the River and that Fagan? And another man were at the House. Bevan ordered me to go with Britton and the other Robber to the House where they bound Fagan? and George Lawson who is free and my master’s other Government man is called Yankey?

And marched us all up to the Men’s Hut and then marched the whole of the men they had so bound down to the kitchen which is quite close to the House made us sit down and tied our feet I am ? Britton stood over us as a sentinel, Bevan and the other man went into the House Bevan brought us some liquor from the House they kept us in the kitchen four or five hours I did not see what property they collected, I saw Bevan take two silver table spoons out of the kitchen cupboard and a copper tea kettle from the oven between two and three o clock in the morning Bevan brought a jar which contained about three gallons of liquid into the kitchen and said here my Lads here is something for you to drink when I am gone it was afterwards found to be vinegar. Bevan then untied James Fagan’s and Joseph Dawsons legs and took them out of the kitchen and said he should take them with him to bring back the horse and the muskets, and he then said to us well good bye my Lads and pulled to the Kitchen Door he first  took George Lawson out of the kitchen

P232

And put him into the house with my mistress her mother and family. The bushrangers then went away a soon as they were gone me and Hall slipped our hands out and untied the rest I did not [know?] what they took away I do not know how many bundles they took I did not see any knapsacks I did not see the Horse Bevan took a saddle, bridle and a spur out of the kitchen I am informed that my master’s Horse and a great deal of property our of the house has been taken away Bevan did not threaten any person, I had never seen Bevan before or either of his companions, Minion, Hillman and John Blakely have lately been employed splitting on the back part of the farm, Blakely was down the River with my Master I am a shoemaker and always work as my trade in the hut yesterday morning being Sunday I went out for a walk with Hall and Joseph Dawson we went about four miles back in the bush to Mr Froggett’s shepherd’s Hut where we saw Mr Froggett’s two men. I did not see any body else during my walk except one of Mr Barnes shepherds who was at Froggett’s Hut.

Signed William Fowler

Taken before me at Launceston the 11th January 1830

Signed W Lyttleton

P233

The further information on oath of William Fowler who saith the foregoing examination which has now been read to me is true I cannot say if this man Thomas Rares? Is one of the men who robbed my aster’s house he is about the height of one of the men his hair is of the same colour I did not take notice of his countenance This pair of leather half boots produced by Mr Hortle was made by men and were the property of my master several pair of half boots similar to these men were stolen from my master’s remises by Bevan and his two companions on the n ight mentioned in my former examination.

Signed William Fowler

Sworn before me at Launceston the 3rd March 1830 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of Thomas Rares.

Signed Mr Lyttleton

The examination of Joseph Dawson who saith I am an assigned servant to Mr Archibald Thomson on last Sunday night was? A week John Bevan, Samuel Britton and a man whose name I do not know robbed my master’s  House and took James Fagan and I with them to carry a part of their plunder – they took my Master’s horse they made me carry half a bag of sugar and some bacon we started in the middle of the night and went towards Lackey  White’s  farm along the River we went past Lackey whites,  they took us upon a big Hill and Bevan

P234

Said he could see the Supply Mills I continued with them until sundown on Wednesday night and when I was upon the Big Hill Bevan shewed me the River and said I was about eight miles from the Supply Mills he told me to take the horse the saddle and bridle and return home he did not give me anything else belonging to my master he gave me no provisions I did not know the way home I travelled through the bush until I made Mr Dry’s stock hut at Piper’s Lagoon on Saturday night and went to Mr Ashborn’s on the next morning who took down in writing what had passed we did not see any person on our way or fall in with any Huts I could not learn the name of the man who was with Bevan and Britton I did not hear him called by any name he is a young man about 18 years of age he is think about five feet, light brown hair, grey eyes, he had cord trowsers and a blue jackets and Kangaroo cap, Bevan told Fagan to come back with me Fagan said he would not that he would not return to the place Mr Thomson’s farm any more he appeared very friendly with the Bushrangers he carried a pistol all the way, when he was going to part he pulled out the pistol from his pocket he said I was always kicking up rows with him and that he would shoot me Bevan said Fagan should not shoot me that he had brought me away and that he would

P235

Send me back again. Fagan swore at me a great deal and threatened me two or three times and said he would not go back with me he said he would follow the Bushrangers and carry their things for a month, I could see the river when I left them they steered farther into the Bush from the river when they sent me off. I got into a scrub and lost myself when I left them they had five or six pounds of flour a good deal of tea and sugar four double barrelled  pieces two muskets I do not know how much ammunition they had no other horse than my master’s the stranger made me walk about twenty or thirty yards from the rest of the men during the greater part of the journey none of the party took any rest whilst I was with them we travelled all Monday and Tuesday night we stopped during the day to have refreshments we frequently found creeks  of water I did not hear Bevan or either of his companions threaten any person.

Signed Joseph Dawson

His x mark

Taken before me at Launceston the 18th day of Jany 1830

Signed W Lyttleton

The further examination on oath of Joseph Dawson who saith the examination which I gave on the 18th January has bee read to me it is true this man Thomas Rares / Roses? Is one of the men who were with Bevan he was armed with a double barreled Gun and stood sentinel in the Yard

P236

Whilst I was in the kitchen with my legs tied this pair of Boots are like those served out to me by my master this man, Rare, led my Master’s horse part of the way in the Bush, I do  not know that he carried any of the articles which were stolen from my master’s premises he carried a knapsack but I do not know what was in it

Signed Joseph Dawson

His x mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 3rd March 1830 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of Thomas Rares

Signed W Lyttleton

The examination on oath of George Lawson who saith I am free and live with Mr Archibald Thomson I recollect his House being Robbed by John Bevan and two other men on a Saturday night about two month ago. I think this man Thomas Rares was one of the Robbers but I am not sure, one of the men was very like the prisoner he was armed with a double barreled piece I am sure one of the Robbers wore this blue jacket they called that Robber Britton none of my clothes were taken away I am sure this pair of leather boots were stolen from Mr Thomson that night. I know them by the shape the make and appearance of the leather they were made by one of Mr Thomson’s men.

Signed George Lawson

Swore before me at Launceston the tenth day of March 1830 and read to the Deponent in the presence  and hearing of Thomas Rares

Signed W Lyttleton

[left margin: produced by Mr Horton {boots}]

p237

The examination on oath of Mr James Hortle of Norfolk Plains District Constable who saith on the eighteenth of last January Thomas Rares was brought to the Police Station at Norfolk Plains he had absconded from the service of Mr William Brumby about three weeks before that time he had received a Gun shot wound in his left arm, I searched him and tooked from his person this pair of leather  half boots this bluecloth jacket this pair of white drill trowsers this striped waistcoat this white cotton shirt marked Archibald Thomsons no 3 and this cowland? Cotton handkerchief they are in the same state they were when I took them from him except being washed I marked them as soon as they were washed they were not of my possession until I brought them to the Police Office at Launceston where I saw them locked up in a chest and have this morning taken them from the same chest and in the same state as they were deposited there.

Signed James Hortle

Sworn before me at Launceston the 14th May 1830 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of Thomas Rares

Signed W Lyttleton

P238

Memo?

Thomas Rares was apprehended by Mr William Brumby who is now in Hobart Town

Thomas Rares saith I have nothing to say I have no witnesses to call

P239

Copies

14th Jan 1830

Rex vs Thomas Rares

Burglary

Sent originals 17 May 1830

Tried at the June sessions 1830

[bushrangers – in pencil]

p240

The information of David Brodie of Launceston who deposeth and saith – as follows

This paper a placard produced I saw stuck up in the Public Streets of Launceston yesterday evening. It is signed “Henry Helps”

I have heard there are several copies of this placard, some of which I have seen myself.

David Brodie

The information on James Lewis Willis.

This placard signed Henry Helps, is the hand writing of the person whose name it bears, formerly a convict employed as a clerk in the Police Office.

Jas Louis Willis (signed)

Police Office

Launceston

2nd October 1831

Henry Helps ordered to find sureties to be of good behaviour for the next six months

W Lyttleton

P241

12 October 1831

Henry Helps

Breach of the Peace

Decided

Chfron?  8/

Chfron 2/

10/

[poster – in pencil]

National Library of Australia Manuscript collection MS3251

box 2 – vol 3-1829-1833

ECHOES OF BUSHRANGING  Days in Van Diemen’s Land BRADY, McCABE, PERRY, GEFFREYS and BRITTON    1834  to 1837

p242

10.363/12

Principal Superintendents Office

12th July 1831

Memorandum

The Lieutenant Governor has ordered Samuel Monday [Mundy?/Munday?] /Almorah/ and Patrick Riley [Commodore Hays] now working in irons to be forwarded to Maria Island by the first opportunity to be employed as Sawyers at the Settlement.

Josiah Spode [signed]

A.Gunn

Superintd

House of Correction

P243

The information and complaint of George Hobler of Killafaddy in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me, one of his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, this first day of February in the Year  of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and thirty which said informant on his Oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as which said informant, on his oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):

On the evening of the thirty first of January /yesterday/ Mrs Hobler mentioned to me that our daughter Mary had complained to her that she did not like the Prisoner Wilson that he was a nasty fellow, and further told her mother that he came to her where she was swinging unbuttoned his trowsers and exposed his person indecently to her, taking out his “Diddle”, the child also stated that the Prisoner had done the same thing the day before.

This morning I took the child to the spot where she described this transaction to have taken place. She showed me where Wilson had stood

P244

On both occasions and she (the child) told me he had made water in her presence with his face towards her exposing his private parts and looking at her at the same time.

George Hobler (signed)

P245

The examination of MARY HOBLER 7 years old in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon Oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies, the 1st Day of February in the Year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty, in the presence and hearing of [blank]

Duly charged before me, upon Oath with

Having willfully indecently exposed his Person to the said Mary Hobler

Which said deponent on her oath deposeth and saith as follows

Yesterday the thirty first of January I was swinging on a swing when the Prisoner Thomas Wilso came to where I was and unbuttoned his trowsers standing with his face towards me, it was in the yard, when he unbuttoned his trowsers, he shewed me “his Diddle” and laughed at me making water at the time – I then went away to the front of the House, my little

P246

Brother went with me he never shewed me his Diddle before this time he came up within two or three paces of me when he made water. I told this to my mother at tea time about an hour afterwards.

Mary  Hobler

Her X mark

P247

The prisoner Thomas Wilson in his defence states that he was making water against some Bank my back was turned to the child – I swear I never faced her at all.

Sentence: to receive one hundred lashes

N Donavan ? [signed]

W Lyttleton [signed]

P248

The information of

George Hobler and Mary Hobler re: Thomas Wilson

Indecently exposing

His person

Decided

[100 lashes – in pencil]

p249

COPY

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Margin] Joseph Moore

Butcher

Free

£50

The information and complaint of Joseph Moore Butcher of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemens Land and its Dependencies this twenty ninth day of January in the Year of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and thirty one which said Informant on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follow. Yesterday evening about eight o clock the twenty eighth of January I was sitting in my Parlour adjoining my shop in front of which a quantity of meat was hanging exposed to sale upon hooks, when I observed John Baptise the prisoner passing through the veranda where the meat was hanging

P250

I instantly got up to see who it was and on looking round I missed a fore quarter of lamb from one of the hooks I immediately followed the prisoner /who had made off/ and overtook him with the quarter of lamb in his hand holding it concealed under his arm, I asked him what he was doing with it, he said he merely took it off the hook to see if any one was watching the shop and that he intended to bring it back again, I took it from him and gave him in charge to a Constable who came up at the tie, this quarter of lamb is my property and the same I took from the prisoner it is worth two shilling and sixpence.

Sigd Joseph Moore

Sworne before me being first read in presence of the prisoner

Sigd W Lyttleton

P251

[Left margin – John Lawrence constable]

The examination of John Lawrence a constable of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace

For Van Diemen’s Land and its dependencies the twenty ninth day of January in the year of Our Lord  One Thousand Eight Hundred and thirty one in the presence and hearing of John Baptise duly before me charged upon oath with stealing and feloniously carrying away one quarter of mutton or lamb the property of Joseph Moore of Launceston. Which said Deponent on his oath aforesaid Deposeth and Saith as follows yesterday evening the twenty eighth of January about eight o clock I was walking up the street towards where Joseph Moore lives when I saw his going after the prisoner I saw

P252

Hi take a quarter of mutton from under the Prisoner’s arm Moore asked me if I was a constable I said yes he then gave the prisoner in charge for having stolen a quarter of mutton – I believe this to be the same mutton that Moore took from the prisoner – The prisoner said he did not take it to steal but to see if Moore kept a sober steady shop and that he was going to take it back again for that he had plenty of provisions without stealing and more than he could make us of and that he had plenty of money and would pay for it – Moore refused to be paid for it saying her would not look over those kind of things – I then took him to the Watch House

Sigd John Lawrence

Taken before me the day and year first above written

Sigd WL

P253

COPY

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of James Robertson of Launceston in Van Diemen’s land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and is Dependencies the twenty ninth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred ad thirty one in the presence and hearing of John Baptise duly charged before me upon oath with stealing and feloniously carrying away one quarter of mutton or lamb the property of Joseph Moore of Launceston which said Deponent on his oath aforesaid Deposeth and Saith as follows –

On yesterday evening the twenty eighth of January about eight o clock I was passing by the end of the street where Joseph Moore lives when I saw Moore Overtake the prisoner John Baptise and take from him a quarter of lamb which

P254

He was carrying under his arm. Joseph Moore accused him of stealing it when the prisoner said he had taken it for fun or something to that effect and offered to pay for it when Moore said he would not look over it and would take him to the watch house, a constable coming up at the time Moore gave his in charge I then went away I think this quarter of mutton is the same I saw Moore take from the prisoner.

Sigd James Robertson

Taken before me the day and year first above written

Sigd WL

P255

Copy of information

In the Moore

Vs Baptise

Felong

Committed for trial before supreme court

Tried before the Court of Quarter sessions Joseph Hone and John Welsh Esq and a military jury

25th June 1831

Guilty

Sentence 7 years

P256 [repeated on 271]

[March 1831 – in pencil]

The statement of John Thompson watch house keeper /late Veteran’s/ free who saith, the Monday night 21st instant Robert Milcove? Ayton, assistant at the hospital

Came to the Watch House, where Francis Shawl/Shaws? The hospital messenger was confined by order of the Police Magistrate, He asked to see the prisoner, I told him he could not see him, nor could any other persons he then said Dr Spencer? Is like a man out of his mind. Jane Torr   who was missing from the hospital was/with Dr Spencer all night he added Dr Spencer wrote me a note this evening saying “Ayton do what you can for me”, and I am come to try you as an old Soldier to do me the favour to let me see Frank, to make it all right. He told me he had burned the note, I then told him I would report the circumstance to the Police Magistrate, I would sooner suffer

P257

Death than that it should be known to Mr Lyttleton “for God’s sake” he repeated “don’t report it”.

Jane Torr   has repeatedly told me when confined by the Police Magistrate in the watch house on bread and water, for being found absent all night from her? Master’s /Mr Gunn’s service/ that she had been all night with Dr Spencer the Colonial Assistant Surgeon

John Thompson

Taken by me and read over to the Deponent before affixing his signature

24th March 1831

W Lyttleton

Fn [iv]

P258  [repeated on pp 270]

The statement of Benjamin Rodgers, constable, who saith as follows, on the Monday morning last at dawn of day /near half past five o clock/ whilst on duty I was passing near the hospital Gate when I saw Jane Torr, Mr Gunn’s assigned female servant, a patient ordered to be confined in the Hospital, coming towards the Gate, she had a handkerchief in her hand, containing a night cap – she had no bonnet or cap on her head, I asked her where she came from, she would not tell me, I told her she had been out all night the Hospital Gate was locked I observed I then went to the room? Where Mr Ayton slept but instead of finding the overseer I found Francis Shawl in Ayton’s bed , he was fast asleep, and I awoke him, I asked his how Mr Gunn’s servant came to be out all night, he then called me on

P259

One side/ he had got up and put on his trowsers/ and told me he had let her out by Dr Spencer’s Orders, I then told him to get the key, and let in the woman, I then went to Elliott, the Doctor’s mate, and asked him if he knew that Jane Torr had been out all night, he said he knew nothing of the matter, I told Francis Shawl he should report the matter, he said he could not help it, he had done no more than he was ordered to do by Dr Spencer, I then left the Hospital.

Benjamin Rodgers (signed)

Taken by me, and read over to Deponent before affixing his signature

W Lyttleton

24th March 1831

p260 [repeated on p274]

131

The statement of Francis Shawl convict, who saith I am messenger to the Hospital on Sunday night, I went to bed in the Hospital about ten o clock Mr Ayton came after the patients were in Bed and locked me up, about five o clock the mat? (Monday) morning, Ayton came to my Bed and let me out, he told me to go into his pace, and to get into his bed, whilst he went out, which I did – I remained until about 6 o clock, when Ayton returned he made no remark, except that it was time to get up, at this tie Jane Torr was missing from her ward – She was brought in by Constable Rogers before six o clock, I told Rogers she was out the night before, I did not see her until brought in by constable Rogers, she

P261

Might have been out all night and I not know it, when Jane Torr was brought in by the constable she said she had slept all night in Dr Spencer’s House She shewed me a pound of silver which she said she got from Mr Scott . Ayton sleeps every night with the nurse Elizabeth Tinsal? Who is a convict, he used to sleep with Mary Temple also, who is now married to John Laverty. I have been frequently sent out to bring spirits to the Hospital there is scarcely a day passes without the women getting spirits in Hospital, if I don’t bring it others do, one night a Chinese came to the hospital with two others of his country man, one of them went into the women’s ward and after being there , he went to Ayton’s Room and Ayton then

P262

141

went away with them, Mr Ayton always locks me and the Wardsman up every night, Mr Ayton sometimes pays at cards with the women in their ward, and they sometimes drink together there.

Francis Shawl?

His x mark

Taken by me and read over to deponent before affixing his mark 24 March 1831

W Lyttleton

P263  fn [v]

151

The statement of William Clark convict, assigned to Mr Arundel Wright, who saith I have been assigned to Mr Wright about 12 months –

I have been in the practice of going to the hospital by my master’s orders to bring a convict woman named Mary Minshull  To his House, I might have been there a dozen times – Mary Minshull has frequently been at Mr Master’s House whilst she was a patient in the Hospital – on  one occasion she came in the day time my master was at the Cataract Superintending the Chain Gang she went there to him.

Sworn by me and read over to deponent 25 March 1831

Willim Clark (signed)

W Lyttleton (signed)

P264

Mary Minshull, convict, confined in the Hospital as a patient. The Reverend Dr Brown states that I saw Mary Minshull at various times walking down the streets, I know she was a patient in the hospital at the time. I asked why she was walking about the town when she was a patient in the hospital, he   told me she had Dr Spencer’s permission to go and look for a place – I observed she could not be always looking for a place and asked if she was not a Prisoner? Ayton  replied yes but she had the Doctor’s permission I considered I could not then interfere any further.

P265

24 March 1831

Information

Re

Dr Spencer

P266

[Jan 1831 – in purple pencil]

In the complaint of David Williams District Constable Paterson’s Plains

Versus

John Short residing on the Complainer’s premises

The complainer humbly begs leave to trouble our worships with a short statement of facts connected with the present case and before doing so, he takes the liberty of mentioning that this Defendant was some time domiciled under Mr Donald Campbell but that gentleman was not agreeing with Mr Short’s principles, he swore the peave against Mr Campbell , who consequently turned him away – He next applied to Mr James Hill Jun or Dun Eden who feeling for Short gave him a residence at his Farm, but this he had soon reason to repent, as Short’s conduct became extremely annoying, and Mr Hill was under the necessity of putting him away from his premises – the Defendant next applied to the Complainant, who feeling for his distressed situation, took compassion on him, and upon the 9th of September 1826, he Granted Short an acre of Ground adjoining his own house at an yearly rent of one shilling, but he had not long entered into possession, when the complainant had good reason to repent of having admitted such a character on his premises. Every thing was a fauet?, the complainant’s pigs and poultry became a nuisance to Mr Short, and nothing would satisfy him, but to have them shut up, or otherwise secured, so that they should not go at large as formerly – infact the complainant could neither do, no say anything to please the Defendant, who on the other hand was exerting every faculty to disturb and annoy the complainant and his family, which he exhibited by open warfare and latterly he entered a regular complaint to Mr Mulgrave the then Police Magistrate, against the complainant but that gentleman after hearing parties dismissed the complaint at same time admonishing Short and telling him that he must certainly be a very ungrateful man.

Short finding himself thus far baffled is all his attempts against the complainant, he next accuses him, his family and Domestics of stealing Blankets from his house at

P267

A time, he said, he was from home. The complainant being indignant at such an accusation, particularly when he always studies to avoid going near the defendant’s premises and prohibited in like manner all his domestics from such and he gave himself no unneasuresss?  At this false and malicious manipulation as he particularly foresaw, that it was propagated with the sole view of irritating him to some breach of the peace? But Short however not contented with the complainiens peaceable demeanour in this affair, he applied to Mr Simpson Magistrate and swore the peace against the complainant and his family, who were thereby obliged to find security to keep the peace, but Mr Simpson then emphatically observed that  ????? saw through the case, an that it evidently originated from private malice.

Not satisfied with all this, Short continued his? Accustomed uncivility towards the complainant ad his family by opprobious epithets, and aggravating gestures, for the evident purpose, and with the intent, of provoking the complainant with a Breach of Peace whereby he might forfeit his Bail Bond, and when he was in the act of putting a Fence adjoining the allotment occupied by Short he? Called out you bloody b—–r you shall not put your fence to join mine  and actually pulled it down, the complainant being still unwilling to have any altercation with this troublesome individual being still under Bond to keep the Peace with him, he however was determined not to put up with such treatment longer and accordingly the complainant proceeded to Mr Mulgrave and complained of this last aggression , when that Gentleman advised him to go and put up his fence and that if Short annoyed him a second time to report the same to him and he would put a stop to Short’s further disturbance – Short it appeared had got notice of this, and the complainient got his fence completed without molestation.

Matters now remained tolerably quiet till within a month ago, when Short called on the Complainant and wished him to purchase a quantity of bark he had on hand for which he offered him 25/- as there were not nearly a load, the complainant filled his Cart with a quantity of bark

P268

He had of his own to make out a load, and Short accompanied the cart into Launceston – on returning however between 12 and 1 o clock of the day, and on the road towards Paterson’s Plains, Short again commenced his favourite spring? In abusing the Complainant and his wife who was also present, with scurrilous and opprobrious epithets, and by calling the complainant a Bloody b—-r and that he should make a miserable man of him yet &c

It is therefore in consequence of this last insufferable and wanton attack, the complainer has been impelled to prefer the present complaint to your worships, but before concluding it may be necessary to remark that since you were pleased to put Short under Bail on the 31st ultimo, he came up towards the Complainien’s House and after venting his usual declamations against the complainer and all his family, he added  you bloody b—-r I will fix you yet, and when he was desired to go home and not disturb the Complainant and his family, he continued his outrageous conduct till he arrived at his own house when he discharged two shots towards the Complainant’s House either out of a pistol or a Gun, at the same time using the most vehement excretions against the complainant and all his family – about the middle of the same night, Short fired another shot towards the Complainant’s Premises accompanied with a repetition of his former threatenings and these circumstances can be proved by 5 witnesses.

Upon the whole it is humbly submitted that a more outrageous, diabolical and troublesome individual will scarcely be found in Van D’s Land, and that the complainant’s wife and family are in danger of their lives by the individual, and as he humbly looks to your worships as the Guardians of the Public, for Protection, both as a private individual and a Public Officer, so the complainant humbly trusts you will inflict such exemplary punishment to put him under such restraint as will prevent a repetition of such glaring and illegal Breaches of the Law.

And as my Duty bounds The complt

Shell ever pray

David Williams (signed)

[D Williams – left margin]

p269

complaint of

David Williams

V

John Short

Jany 1831

10/- bond

8/ bond

5/

2/6

1/

£1.6.6

p270 March 1831 in purple pencil [repeated from pp  258]

/1/

Private

The statement of Benjamin Rogers, constable, who saith as follows, on the Monday morning last at dawn of day /near half past five o clock/ whilst on duty I was passing near the hospital Gate when I saw Jane Torr, Mr Gunn’s assigned female servant, a patient ordered to be confined in the Hospital, coming towards the Gate, she had a handkerchief in her hand, containing a night cap – she had no bonnet or cap on her head, I asked her where she came from, she would not tell me, I told her she had been out all night the Hospital Gate I observed was locked. I then went to the room where Mr Ayton slept but instead of finding the overseer I found Francis Shawl in Ayton’s bed , he was fast asleep, and I awoke him, I asked his how Mr Gunn’s servant came to be out all night,

P271

he then called me on one side/ he had got up and put on his trowsers/ and told me he had let her out by Dr Spencer’s Orders, I then told him to get the key, and let in the woman, I then went to Elliott, the Doctor’s mate, and asked him if he knew that Jane Torr had been out all night, he said he knew nothing of the matter, I told Francis Shawl he should report the matter, he said he could not help it, he had done no more than he was ordered to do by Dr Spencer, I then left the Hospital.

Benjamin Rogers (signed – original]

Taken by me, and read over to Deponent before affixing his signature

W Lyttleton

24th March 1831

p272 [repeated on p256]

/2/

The statement of John Thompson watch house keeper /late Veteran’s/ free who saith, the Monday night 21st instant Robert Milcove? Ayton, assistant at the hospital

Came to the Watch House, where Francis Shawl/Shaws? The hospital messenger was confined by order of the Police Magistrate, He asked to see the prisoner, I told him he could not see him, nor could any other persons he then said Dr Spencer? Is like a man out of his mind. Jane Torr   who was missing from the hospital was/with Dr Spencer all night he added Dr Spencer wrote me a note this evening saying “Ayton do what you can for me”, and I am come to try you as an old Soldier to do me the favour to let me see Frank, to make it all right. He told me he had burned the note, I then told him I would report the circumstance to the

P273

Police Magistrate, I would sooner suffer death than that it should be known to Mr Lyttleton “for God’s sake” he repeated “don’t report it”.

Jane Torr   has repeatedly told me when confined by the Police Magistrate in the watch house on bread and water, for being found absent all night from her? Master’s /Mr Gunn’s service/ that she had been all night with Dr Spencer the Colonial Assistant Surgeon

Jno Thompson

Taken by me and read over to the Deponent before affixing his signature

24th March 1831

W Lyttleton

P274 [repeated from p260]

131

The statement of Francis Shawl convict, who deposeth and saith as follows – I am messenger to the Hospital on Sunday night, I went to bed in the Hospital about ten o clock Mr Ayton came after the patients were in Bed and locked me up, about five o clock the mat? (Monday) morning, Ayton came to my Bed and let me out, he told me to go into his pace, and to get into his bed, whilst he went out, which I did – I remained until about 6 o clock, when Ayton returned he made no remark, except that it was time to get up, at this time Jane Torr was missing from her ward – She was brought in by Constable Rogers before six

P275

o clock, I told Rogers she was out the night before, I did not see her until brought in by constable Rogers, she might have been out all night and I not know it, when Jane Torr was brought in by the constable she said she had slept all night in Dr Spencer’s House She shewed me a pound of silver which she said she got from Mr Scott . Ayton sleeps every night with the nurse Elizabeth Tinsal? Who is a convict, he used to sleep with Mary Temple also, who is now married to John Laverty. I have been frequently sent out to bring spirits to the Hospital there is scarcely a day passes without the women getting spirits in Hospital, if I don’t bring it others do, one night a Chinese came to the hospital with two others

p276

of his country man, one of them went into the women’s ward and after being there , he went to Ayton’s Room and Ayton then went away with them, Mr Ayton always locks me and the Wardsman up every night, Mr Ayton sometimes pays at cards with the women in their ward, and they sometimes drink together there.

Francis Shawl?

His x mark

Taken by me and read over to deponent before affixing his mark 24 March 1831

W Lyttleton

[red ink]

John Laverty

V

Mary  Temple

memo

the Revd Dr Brown has state to me, that the Husband of this woman complained to him, that his wife had slept with Ayton the night previous to her marriage in the Hospital, and assigned this as a reason for his refusing to marry her after being asked in church.

W Lyttleton

25 March 31

p277

/5/

Eliza Jones being sworn states I have been a patient in the Hospital for about a fortnight on Tuesday last overseer Ayton was asked by me for leave to go out for sell? An hour? – Ayton told me I might go for two hours, I accordingly went away, and I got intoxicated I was taken up by order of the Police Magistrate about half a mile from the Town and returned? Back to the Hospital a man named Gould heard Ayton give me leave to be absent from the hospital.

Eliza Jones

Her x mark

Taken before me this 12 March 1831.

W Lyttleton

P278 [see p264 for more evidence by Dr Brown in this case]

/5/

Statement of the Reverend Dr Browne LLD who deposeth and saith as follows

I have seen Mary Minshull a female convict confined in the Hospital, at various times walking about the streets in the Town – she was then a patient in the Hospital. I asked Ayton who is in charge. Why Mary Minshull was allowed to walk about the town when she was a patient in the hospital?, he replied she had Dr Spencer’s permission to do so, and that she was looking for a place. I observed shed could not always be searching for a place, and asked if she was not a prisoner Ayton replied, yes, but she had the Doctors permission – I then considered I ould not interfere any further.

Taken before me in the presence of Revd D Browne

14 March 1831

p279

Statement relative to Hospital &c

Launceston

Private

No.1

[in pencil:

Benjamin Rogers

John Thompson

Francis Shawl

Eliza Jones

D Kirwan

P280

Present

W Kenworthy

GS Davis esq

Long Meadow 31st July 1833

296 Joseph Holton? Martins 7 years
1033 Francis Macklin Georgiana 7 years
485 James Arnold Elizabeth 7 years
895 William Mitchell Larkins 7
John Can Georgiana life
718 John Williams Earl St Vincent life
560 Wr Johnston Lord Lyndock 7
1172  [x in grey pencil] Thos Case John Life
1399  [x in grey pencil] Thomas Challin Longland? Life  – Col secty
5/850 James Hanaway Malibu/City of Edinburgh 7 yrs/life
630 [Boy – 75 = in pencil] Andrew Hading? Serjrainer??? life
1281 John Ward Larkins 14 years
60 John Yales Lady Harwood Life
281 Jeremiah Gram? Royal George 7
1613 Joseph Bainstow Strathfieldsay Life
963 Samuel Warns? Thomas Life
827 WM Robinson L Wm Bentinck 7 years
452 Thos Taylor York 1 Life
296 John Jones Woodman Life

P281

32 Wm Vaughan Carl H Vincent 14 years
363 Wm Allington W? Charles Forbes 14
810 James Clark Asia 2 7 extd 3
1256 John Watson Highegh?? 7
563 Henry Perkins Thomas Life
1000 John Coper/Cooper Surry 7 yrs 14
356 Wm Jones Mw Miles Life
1545 George Board? Highegh?? Life
Acct? John Jolly York Life
131 George Osborne Elizabeth Life
John Carins/crews Ellen Mar???ner 12 months Launceston
Wm Harwood? Manlius 2 Gave 7 years
977 Joseph Massam Cath E Stewart Forbes 14 years

Ms 3251 NLA vol 1829-1833

[Long Meadow 31st July 1833]

Insubordination

W Nottman being sworn states I am supt of the Road Party at the Long Meadows – This morning it was reported to me by the overseers and constables that the men confined in the Gaol refused to go to their  work – I went there immediately  and

P282

When the door was opened I asked them twice what was their reason for not going to work but no one made any reply.

M Nottman (signed)

James Barfoot being sworn saith I am overseer of the Gang employed at the Long Meadow when I went to turn the man out this morning that were confined in gaol to their work I found them lying and sitting down  on desiring them to turn out – several men from the farther end of the gaol cried out no – and none of them offered to move – I made a second attempt in about ten minutes with no better affect and then reported it to NW Nottman – One man named Clark said no we had played up with them they would play up with us.

James Barfoot

James Davies being sworn states I am a constable stationed at the Long Meadows – this morning the overseer – James Barfoot sent a man to me to say that they men confined in the gaol refused to go

P283

Out to their work – I went down to the gaol and enquired the reason why they refused to go to their work – but no one made any reply nor did any one offer to move – they have not been at work all day.

James Davies

His x mark

Defence – the Prisoners have nothing to say

Sentence – one hundred lashes each and James Clark one hundred and fifty

Wm Kenworthy (signed)

JC?  Davies (signed)

Entd JKC ?

P284

31 July 1833

Information

Vs

Prisoners in the Road

Party

See Extract this date

P285 May 1833 in purple pencil

Island of Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Distress warrant

To Mr Thomas Newton District Chief Constable of the said Island and to all petty Constables an others whom it may concern

WHEREAS John Adams Publican of Launceston in the said island was on the third day of Mary 1833 in Launceston in the said island, duly convicted, before one William Lyttleton Esquire William Kenworthy and GS Davies Esquires three of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the said Island and its Dependencies, upon an information in that behalf duly exhibited before me

For that he the said john Adams did on Sunday the 14th day of April last  on his Licenced Premises knowingly permit and suffer persons to remain tippling and drinking they not being bona fide travelers or inmates of the said house

Contrary to the Provisions of the Act in Council of this Island, No: 2 entitles “An Act for regulating the sale of wine and of Beer, Rum and other malts and spirituous Liquors by Retail and promoting good order in Public Houses”.

By which said Offence and by Virtue of the said Act, he the said

John Adams

P286

Became liable to pay the Penalty or Sum of Ten Shillings besides the Costs and Charges of the said conviction, which Costs and Charges were on the said Third day of May ascertained and assessed at the Sum of five shillings and six pence the said Penalty or Sum of Ten shillings to go and be distributed as in and by the said Deed? Is provided

And it appearing to me the said Justice, that the said, John Adams, hath neglected to pay the aid several sums, or either of them, or any part thereof, and that the same still remains unpaid, I do therefore hereby authorize and require you the said Constables, either of your jointly or severally to forthwith make distress of the goods and Chattels of him the said

John Adams

And if within the space of five days next after such Distress by you taken the said Penalty r Sum of Ten Shillings and also the Costs and charges of the said Conviction shall not be paid, that then you do cause the said Goods and Chattels by you seized to be appraised and sold rendering the overplus (if any), to him the said John Adams after deducting the said Penalty or Sum of Ten Shillings and coast and charges as aforesaid, as well also the Costs and Charges and all incidental expenses of the said Distress and Sale and which said Penalty or Sum of Ten Shillings you are to pay to me the said Justice to go and be distributed, as is herein- before mentioned, and if sufficient distress cannot be had or found whereupon to levy the said Penalty or Sum of Ten Shillings and Cost and Charges as aforesaid, you are hereby required to certify the same to me, together with the return of this precept.

Herein not fail.

GIVEN under my Hand and Seal, at Launceston this 14th Day of May One thousand eight Hundred and thirty three

W Lyttleton

P287

John Adams appears and Pleads Guilty to the annexed information

Fined ten shillings and costs

W Lyttleton

W Kenworthy

GS Davies

Police Office

Launceston

3rd May 1833

p288

INFORMATION ACT NO. 2

ISLAND OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

BE IN REMEMBERED, that on the twenty seventh day of April in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty three at Launceston in the said Island of Van Diemen’s land, cometh

John Keenahan  In his own proper person before me

William Lyttleton Esquire

one of  His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Island and its Dependencies

And giveth me the said Justice to understand and be informed that

John Adams of Launceston

In Van Diemen’s Land aforesaid, licenced Publican on Sunday the fourteenth

Day of April instant did in his licenced Public House situate in Launceston aforesaid, being the sign of “The Barley Sheaf”

Knowingly permit and suffer

Persons to remain tippling and drinking they not being bona fide travelers nor inmates of the said House

Against the Conditions of his the said John Adams

, Recognizance in that behalf entered into, and against the Form of the Act in Council of this Island, no.2, intituled “An Act for regulating the Sale of Wine, and of Beer, Rum, and other Malt and spirituous Liquors by Retail, and promoting good Order in Public Houses”, by which said Offence, the said

John Adams

Hath become liable to forfeit and pay the penalty of Ten Pounds whereupon the aid

John Keenahan prays that the said

John Adams may be summoned to appear and answer to this information, and make his defence thereto.

Exhibited and taken the Day and Year first above written, before me,

W Lyttleton (Signed)

John Keenahan (signed)

P289

3rd May 1833

Keenahan vs Adams

Publican

Breach of his recognizance

Fined Ten shillings

??? 4/6

c?? 1/

5/6

??????????

ch?  8/?

T?? 5/

13/00

p290 March 1833 – in blue pencil

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of James Fenton  who deposeth and saith as follows

On Saturday afternoon the 23rd instant I was in my house in Wellington Street Launceston, when between four and five o clock, John Connolly came into my house, and asked me what was the cause of the dispute between his wife and me, I told him what had occurred, and the treatment I had received from her, he was leaving my house when he turned round and said “you bloody monkey what have you to do with the pig” and struck me on the face with his fist, he challenged me to fight, but I refused I swear that I am I bodily fear that he will further abuse me and I pray that justice may be done.

James Fenton (signed)

Sworn before me this 25 March 1833

W Lyttleton (signed)

P291

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of James Fenton who deposeth and saith as follows

I am a Gunsmith and reside in Launceston. On Saturday morning the 23rd instant a servant man of Mrs? Connolly came to my house and asked the price of a suckling pig, I told him eight shillings : – in the afternoon he returned and offered me six shillings stating I owed Mrs Connolly two shillings, I denied that I owed her any thing. After this Mrs Connolly herself came and asked me what I meant by the message sent by her servant I said there was nothing improper in the message I sent, for that I did not owe her two shillings and therefore would not pay her. She then said that she would have it out of me and taking up a handful of stones she threw them at me, and this

P292

Cut on my head was made by one of them. She then went home, I am much hurt by the stone she threw at me and am afraid she will do me some serious bodily harm and pray that justice may be done.

Sowrn before me this 25 March 1833

James Fenton (signed)

W Lyttleton (signed)

John Connelly Pleads not guilty

Thomas Tomkinson sworn saith – on Saturday the 23rd of March instant I was at James Fenton’s  house there was a dispute between James Fenton and John Connelly and Mrs Connelly I did not see any blows

P293

Pass – as soon as Connelly came I went away.

I heard some words but I did not hear what they were

Thomas Tomkinson

His x mark

Thomas Tompkinson realled states

I saw Fenton’s head bleeding before Connelly came

John Smith sworn saith I am a prisoner employed in the Post Department.

On the 23rd of March instant I was at John Connelly’s Public House Mrs Connelly went me to James Fenton’s for a Pig, I went and offered him six shillings for the pig

P294

And two shillings which Mrs Connelly said Fenton owed her he replied making use of horrible language that she should not have the Pig – I returned and told Mrs Connelly the message I had received – Mrs Connelly said she would ask Fenton what he meant by sending such a message

John Smith (signed)

Jeremiah Donohoo (?Donoghue) sworn saith I am a prisoner employed in the Government Works on the 23rd March instant I was at james Fenton’s house Mrs Connelly came up and asked Fenton what sort of a message that was to send to her – Fenton took up a piece of Dirt

P295

And threw it at Mrs Connelly and called her a B____y whore. I told him to stop he threw another piece of dirt and knocked Mrs Connelly’s cap off as she was running away – I did not see Mrs Connelly throw any thing at Fenton.

Jeremiah Donohoo

His x mark (did sign this ‘x’)

William Brighton

Sworn saith on the 23rd instant I heard some loud conversation take place between Mrs Connelly and James Fenton. Fenton called

P296

Mrs Connelly a B____y Whore and Sow. I saw Mrs Connelly’s cap and comb fly off from soething I believe thrown at her by Fenton. Mrs Connelly threw womthing at Fenton.

Wm Brighton (signed)

Charge Dismissed

Police Office Launceston

29th March 1833

Theodore Bartley

GS Davies

Matthew Curling Friend fn[vi]

(all signed)

p297

29th March 1833

Fenton vs

Jno Connelly and Catherine Connelly

Assault

Dismissed

Cw £1.3.

c/? £ -.5.-

£ 1:8:-

p298

Clarence Pl ???   1st Nov 1833

Sir,

I beg leave to acquaint you that the undermentioned prisoners have been brought before me viz:

Oct 1833

-7  Benjamin Hudson no. [blank] pr Circassian 7 years assigned to the Revd Robert Gibbs of Clarence Plains

Charged by his overseer? Robert Hancock with insufferable insolence to him on Friday and Saturday last and likewise by his mistress with gross insolence to her yesterday morning.

Sentenced to received twenty lashes

-12  Thomas Alexander No. [blank] pr Surry? 2nd sentence? Assigned to John McRa of Restdown?

Sentenced to receive twenty five lashes for gross prevarication in his evidence to me this day upon oath in a case of Trespass.

-16 Samuel Dean no [blank] pr Sir Chas Forbes 2d Seven yrs assigned assigned to Thomas Free of  Clarence Plains.

Charged by his master with maliciously malsing? (bashing?) and assaulting a man, his property and with being grossly insolent to himself.

Sentenced to received twenty lashes.

To William J? Parramore Esq

Police Magistrate

Richmond

over

P299

1833

October

-17 Thomas Harris No [blank] pr Proteus seven years assigned to John Gibson of Clarence Plains Charged with insolence to him. Admonished.

-19 George Harwood No787 Asia 2 fourteen years assigned to Daniel Manfield Clarence Plains. Charged by his master with returning drunk last night from town when in charge of some valuable property and with thus? Committing a most violent and outrageous assault H? Balling, upon him. Also by constable? Robinson with escaping from his custody  when taking him to the watch house in a cart.

Sentenced to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for twelve months and afterwards to be sent to the other side of the island.

-19Robert Fox no 306  pr Andromeda sentence Life assigned to Daniel Stanfield Clarence Plains Charged by his master with disobedience of orders in refusing to come to his assistance when assaulted and beaten by George Harwood  and with afterwards using threatening language to him.-

Sentenced to receive fifty lashes and afterwards to be assigned into some other district.

Over/

P300

1833

October 13, 2009

21 Thomas Smith pr Lolus? Sentence seven years

Thomas Pickering no [blank] pr Elizabeth seven years

Assigned to John Morrisby Clarence Plains. Charged by Constable Robinson with being absent from their master’s place, without a pass, on Friday night last, and with having Guns in their possession – dismissed having had their master’s permission.

31 – Geo Scott no [blank] pr Clyde – sentenced life – assigned to the Rev Robert Gibbs Clarence Plains. Charged by his overseer Robert Hancock? With being extremely insolent and abusive to him yesterday morning. Sentenced to be kept to hard labour for two months.

I have the honor to remain

Sir

Your most obed

LR? Dawson  JP (signed)

Sent?

J Geo? Mc Neilly  PC (signed)

P301

? October 1833

SR Dawson Esq

Magistrate Returns

P302

Police Office Launceston

10th May 1833

Thomas  Kelly Appears to the annexed information and pleads not guilty

Thomas Seddon sworn saith, I am a constable at Launceston, on the night of the 18th of last month about nine o clock I was in company with the chief constable on duty. He went to the Public House called the sign of the Elephant and Castle . I saw a prisoner of the crown named Ann Bennett there she was standing up in a Dance with many others. I was ordered by Mr Newton? To take Ann Bennett out of the House as it was after hours.

Fined ten shillings  & costs

GS Davies

Matthew Curling Friend

(signed)

p303

INFORMATION ACT NO. 2

ISLAND OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

BE IN REMEMBERED, that on the   sixth day of May in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty three at Launceston in the said Island of Van Diemen’s land, cometh

THOMAS NEWTON  In his own proper person before me

William Lyttleton Esquire

one of  His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Island and its Dependencies

And giveth me the said Justice to understand and be informed that

THOMAS KELLY of Launceston

In Van Diemen’s Land aforesaid, licenced Publican on Sunday the EIGHTEENTH

Day of April  NOW LAST PAST instant did in his licenced Public House situate in Launceston aforesaid, being the sign of “The ELEPHANT AND CASTLE”

Knowingly permit and suffer

Ann Bennett a prisoner of the crown to remain after the hour of night she not being a bona fide traveler nor an inmate of the said house.

Against the Conditions of his the said THOMAS KELLY

, Recognizance in that behalf entered into, and against the Form of the Act in Council of this Island, no.2, intituled “An Act for regulating the Sale of Wine, and of Beer, Rum, and other Malt and spirituous Liquors by Retail, and promoting good Order in Public Houses”, by which said Offence, the said

THOMAS KELLY

Hath become liable to forfeit and pay the penalty of Ten Pounds whereupon the said

THOMAS NEWTON prays that the said

THOMAS KELLY may be summoned to appear and answer to this information, and make his defence thereto.

Exhibited and taken the Day and Year first above written, before me,

W Lyttleton (Signed)

Thos Newton (signed)

P304

10th May 1833

Newton vs Kelly

Publican

Breaking Act of Council no 2

Fined Ten shillings

Ck 5/6

Con 1/

6/6

[elephant and castle – in pencil]

p305

Vane Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Matthew Curling Friend  – in left margin

The information and complaint of Matthew Curling Friend Esquire who being sworn deposeth and saith – On the morning of Wednesday the twenty fourth day of April instant, I was sleeping in a room of the House occupied by William Lyttleton Esquire in Launceston – About five o clock I was awoke by my wife who stated that someone was in the room – I then heard a noise and immediately called out “who is there?” receiving no reply I threatened to shoot the person if they did not speak – I heard a rustling in the room, and receiving no answer I sprang out of the bed and perceived by the little light which shone in at the window a man who appeared to be trying to conceal himself between the bed and the wall – I immediately seized him and called for assistance, Mr Lyttleton directly came to my assistance armed with a Blunderbuss, and with his

P306

His aid and that of a constable we secured the man and found it was the prisoner now at the Bar named Francis Wright who is Clerk to me as Port Officer – I missed nothing from the room, but there was property consisting of trinkets of considerable value lying on the table – the prisoner was close to the table, he offered but little resistance, he was unarmed and talked incoherently when questioned.

Sworn before me this 24th day of April 1833

TL? GS Davies (signed)

[sgd] Mat Curling Friend

p307

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information of Mrs Mary Ann Friend who deposeth and saith – On Wednesday morning the twenty fourth of April instant I was in bed in a room in Mr Lyttleton’s House I had been asleep – between four and five o clock I was awoke by hearing a noise in the adjoining room like some one moving about I at first thought it was only fancy – presently I again heard a noise like a door opening – the room has two doors, one was bolted on the inside the other merely latched – I had closed the door that was bolted myself previous to my retiring to bed, hearing the noise continue like some one grasping about the room I aroused Captain Friend who jumped up and seized a man at the foot of the bed – I got up and found the door as left latched just open

P308

I ran out = it was quite dark and some time before daylight.

On going to bed I had placed on the dressing table a watch and jewels of considerable value, but I do not miss anything whatever.

I ran out of the room leaving Mr Friend with the man and called Mr Lyttleton to assist – I did not return to the room until after the man was taken away.

Sgd Mary Ann Friend

Sworn before me this 26th of April 1833

T GS Davies

P309

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information of Wiliam Lyttleton Esquire who being sworn saith On Wednesday morning last the twenty fourth of April instant about five o clock before daylight, it was  perfectly dark, I was asleep and aroused by Mrs Friend calling for assistance saying that some one was murdering he husband. I took a loaded blunderbuss and proceeded to the room occupied by Mr and Mrs Friend. Mr Friend then told me he had seized a man and requested me to call a constable – I told him I had a Blunderbuss loaded with Buck Shot and that if the man attempted to escape I would blow him to atoms – I then called for the constable on duty – Constable Rogers came, I told him there was a man in Captain Friend’s room, and to go and secure him – Rogers went in and shortly after

P310

Brought out the prisoner /Francis Wright/ accompanied by Captain Friend who stated that he was his clerk. I ordered him to be taken to the Watch House until morning about 2 o clock in the morning before I went to bed I had been to my stable – the prisoner could not have followed me in to the best of my belief. – On obtaining a light I proceeded to Mr Friend’s room, and on a table I saw a valuable necklace and other articles of jewelry which Mrs Friend had worn that evening. The prisoner talked about an our afterwards when I saw him in the Watch House in a most incoherent manner and said he had been driven into the house by a bullock.

SC? W Lyttleton (signed)

Sworn before me this 26th April 18333

Sd  GS Davies

P311

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

[left margin – Benjamin Rogers constable]

The information of Benjamin Rogers who deposeth and saith I am a constable at Launceston on the morning of Wednesday last the twenty fourth of April instant I was on duty at the Police Magistrate’s House – a little after five o clock I heard the clock strike about a quarter of an hour before I heard a noise in the house I went round to the back door, but could not get in, the door I allude to is the kitchen door not the house door not being able to get in I went round again to the front the door was opened – Mrs Friend called me I ran in Mrs Friend told me that Mr Friend had got some one in the bed room – I ran into the bed room, it was quite dark

P312

I felt about the room and found Mr Friend holding a man, I took hold of him and both together we took him out of the house – the day was just dawning – it was the prisoner present – Francis Wright . I took him to the Watch House with the assistance of another constable – on the way he told us that he had followed Mr Lyttleton into the house – he talked incoherently.

S  Benjamin Rogers

Sworn before me this 26th April

S  GS Davies

P313

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

[left margin:

John Brown Free

£50:0:0]

The information of John Brown who deposeth and saith I am a Baker, and reside at the corner of Saint John and Cimitiere Street Launceston. The office of the Port Office joins my house – the Prisoner Francis Wright I know, he is Clerk to the Port Officer. On the night of the twenty third of April instant about half past eight o clock not quite so much, he came to my house got a light and went away, about eleven o clock I was in Bed and was disturbed  by a noise. I heard the prisoner running from the front door to the back and talking to himself – I heard his voice – this continued all night – about half past four o clock on Wednesday morning the 24th April I heard him on the top of the shingles

P314

Of the skilling of my house, I called to him, his reply was “If bullocks were chasing you as they are me you would be glad to get into my place out of the way” these were his words as hear as I can repeat them – shortly after this he left which I think must have been about half past four o clock.

Sgd  John Brown

Sworn before me this 26th day of April 1833

Sgd  GS Davies

P315

The prisoner Francis Wright states he has nothing more to say than that he was in a state of intoxication.

Before me this 26th April 1833

Sgd  GS Davies

P316

26 April 1833

copy

Rex vs Francis Wright

Burglary

Supreme Court

[Captain Friend ???? – in pencil]

p317

Island of Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of Anthony Cottrell who saith as follows:

I am Chief Constable at Launceston. Last week I was informed that the following articles which had been stolen by the bushrangers Ward & others were in the house or on the premises of James Hilley?/Hissey?/Kissey?  and John Summer situate on the east bank of the River Tamar.

These are as follows: viz three large silver spoons, one silver fish slice, one silver ladle?, several shirts, handkerchiefs, stockings& waistcoats,one corduroy jacket and several other articles, this property was stolen part from Captain Kneale? Of George Town and part  from Capt Stuart’s? Overseer? On the Tamar, from the above information I have

P318

Reason to believe that part of the whole of the said property is in the houses or on the premises of the said James Hilley?/Hissey?/Kissey? and John Summer and assign??? For a warrant to search the premises.

Anthy Cottrell ch:col (signed)

Sworn before me this 19th Feby 34

Wm Kenworthy

P319

19th feby 1834

intv  Anthony Cottrell

Search warrant

Not found

No fees

END OF VOL

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