ms 3251 1827-1828 box 1 vol 1

ECHOES OF BUSHRANGING DAYS IN VAN DIEMEN’S LAND: BRADY, MCCABE, PERRY, GEFFREYS, AND BRITTON
1827-1828
ms 3251  Vol 1 of 4 in box 1 . Collection of the National Library of Australia.

TRANSCRIPT:

TEMPLATE

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of     of                         in Van Diemen’s land          taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the BLANK  day  of BLANK in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty BLANK in the presence and hearing of BLANK duly charged before me upon oath BLANK

which said deponent on   BLANK oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):-

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Jan 1827

I hereby acknowledge I have this day namely the fifteenth day of January 1827 I hired myself to Mr Thomas Archer of Woolmers for twelve calendar months for which time of service I am receiving thirty pounds sterling and the following slops and Rations, namely Four cotton striped shirts, one blue cloth jacket, one pair of blue cloth trowsers, one duck frock, two pairs of duck trowsers, and three pairs of shoes during the said twelve months, also ten pound and a half of meat, twelve pounds of coarse flour, three ounces of common tea, one pound and a half of coarse sugar, two ounces of common soap and two ounces of Tobacco each and every week during the said twelve months; and for which said sum on money, slops and Rations I do hereby engage and work for the said Mr Archer at my trade as a carpenter, or in repairing or making carts, wheels for or at any other kind of work that Mr Archer may wish to put me to and that I may be able to perform, and I do engage and exert myself both early and late for Mr Archer’s benefit so long as I continue in his Service

Dated at Woolmers, Lake River

this 15th day of January 1827

Witness Wm Archer Jnr

Signed [actually signed by]

Edward Fuller [in large and shaky handwriting]

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The information and complaint of Mr Thomas Archer of Woolmers, Bathurst [?] who being duly sworn saith, on the fifteenth day of this present month of January I hired Edward Fuller a rough carpenter for twelve months certain as per the agreement which I know [now?] produce signed by Edward Fuller & witnessed by Mr Wm Archer – The said Edward Fuller continued steadily at his work until breakfast time this morning the twenty second day of January instant and I am now informed by my overseer Joseph Moore that he said Edward Fuller has left my premises and taken with him his clothes and other articles, intending not to return to his work – I therefore pray that the said Edward Fuller may be caused to appear before the magistrate & answer to my complaint and to be further dealt with according to law.

[signed] Thomas Archer

Sworn before me this 22nd day of Jan 1827

James Cox JP

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The information and complaint of Mr George Carthead/Castheart

of Launceston in VDL taken upon oath before me, one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its dependencies, this 30th day of January in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven. Which said informant on h is oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say): – on or about the month of June last I purchased a Boy gelding of Mr John Smith of Norfolk Plains about the twelfth day of September last I put the said Gelding into Mr Charlton’s Yard at Launceston and on or about the nineteenth of that month he was missing from the said yard. I advertised the horse in the colonial times  paper and offered a Reward for his recovery. Last Tuesday the twenty third instant I had received information of my horse being in the possession of James Lindsey, one of the government messengers in consequences of which I went to the government stable at Perth yesterday the twenty ninth instant and there found my Horse in the said Stables he was in one of the stables tied up to the Manger the Doors of the Stables were locked. I went to constable Lloyd who lives close to the stables he immediately called to Lindsey to open the stable door Lindley came out

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of the same apartment in which Lloyd then was and unlocked the stable door. I said to Lindley that is my Horse he replied it is impossible it is a government horse and delivered to me as such and was given to me by Mr Williatt Postmaster of Launceston, I rode the Horse to Launceston this morning accompanied by Constable Lloyd in whose custody the horse now is, this is the Horse. It is my property. I know it by a small cut under the li of the right eye I gave 40 pounds for it.

Genv  Casthcart

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The information of Mr Newman Williatt Post Master of Launceston who being sworn saith about fifteen months ago Cashmore Garel/Izranel (?) the Government Messenger came to my office with a brown or bay horse which he said belonged to Government he rode that horse until about the month of last April when he said the Horse had got away and he continued to bring  the mail on foot, during the time Izranel rode that Horse the Horse had a very sore back both his knees were broken I cannot give any other description of that Horse I was confined to my Room at this time by illness about the Latter end of September I was standing one day at my Door when I saw a brown coloured horse in the street I thought it was the Messenger Horse and I told John Symes my Servant to go and catch it, he did so and brought the Horse into the Yard, I again  looked at the Horse as it passed my Door I did not examine in minutely I felt confident from the general appearance of the Horse

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that it was the same I had seen Izranel ride, and which I understood belonged to Government, I therefore suffered him to take the Horse away the next time he came which I think was on the next Monday, Izranel when he took the horse away did not say it was the same horse he had rode before he did not make any remark to me about the Horse the Horse now produced is of the same colour and appearance as the Horse rode by Izranel but I cannot say it is the same Horse, It was about eleven or twelve o clock when Izranel went away with the Mail on the Monday night alluded to the next week when Izranel returned he told me that the Horse had fallen over a log and he was leaving Launceston and that the Horse had got away a few days afterwards I heard the Horse was in Jacob’s Yard and I sent Lindsey there for the Horse when he was first made Messenger.

Newman Williatt (signed)

Sworn before me at Launceston

the thirtieth day of January 1827

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Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of William Lloyd  of Perth in Van Diemen’s land Constable taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the BLANK day  of BLANK in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty BLANK in the presence and hearing of BLANK duly charged before me upon oath BLANK

which said deponent on h BLANK oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):- I reside at the Gaol at Perth a part of the Gaol is used as a Stable for government Horses I know James Lindsay he is one of the Government messengers he has been living with me about eight weeks except when he is on duty. I have lived at Perth since the third of last November Lindsey has frequently called there with a Bay Horse which he said was the property of the Crown he has gone on to Launceston five or six times with the horse Lindsey was at Perth when I first went to live there I never saw him have any other Horse in his possession yesterday evening the twenty ninth of January Mr Cathcart came to Perth and asked me.

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to let him look at the government Horse I asked James Lindsey to unlock the stable  door, he did so Mr Cathcart looked into the stable and said I believe that is my horse if he is so you will find the marks I will describe to you Mr Cathcart said the Horse had a small scar under his right eye Lindsey said it was the horse he had had ever  since he had been a Messenger and that he had received the horse from Mr Williatt who is the Post Master at Launceston this is the Horse, Lindsey put the key into the Lock of the Door but could not unlock it Mr Serjeantson Groom /James Erthington was present and unlocked the door

William Lloyd

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The examination of  James Lindsey who saith I am government messenger I have been employed to carry the Mail from Launceston to Mr Willis’s farm the 30th September last until about the middle of November and since that time between the Elizabeth Creek and Perth when I was first made Messenger Mr Williatt the Post Master at Launceston told me to go to John Jacobs in Launceston for a Horse I went to Jacobs this Horse was then in his Yard he delivered it to me, I took it to Mr Williat’s the Horse was then not fit to go a journey and I went that day on foot on to the Cocked Hat with dispatches, before I went I put the Horse in the government stable I returned to Launceston the same evening and the next day took the Horse to Mr Willis’s and have had him in my possession ever since until last night during the first six weeks I rode the horse into Launceston every week

James Lindsey (signed)

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The information of John Symes of Launceston who being sworn saith I am an assigned Servant to Mr W2illiatt the Post Master of Launceston about the twentieth of last June Cashmore Izanet was messenger and was in the habit of coming to my master’s every week with a bay Horse and on or about that day I was passing the horse when he kicked me and broke my arm the Horse had then a sore back and both its knees were sore they had been broken I went to the Hospital about six or seven weeks afterwards I saw a bay Horse in the Street I told my master I thought it was the Messengers Horse he desired me to catch it I did so and Izanet the Messenger took it away with him the week afterwards a few days after I saw the same Horse in John Jacobs an allotment of Ground where John Jacobs then lived when Izanet came back the next week he said the Horse had fallen over a stump and had got away the Horse I have now seen in the Police Office yard is the same Horse I so caught and afterwards saw in Jacob’s allotment I do not know whether or not this is the Horse that broke my arm.

I do not think is is the same because its knees appear as if they had never been broken. I am employed as a Baker at Mr Williat’s

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirtieth day of January 1827

John Symes

Information respecting Mr Cathcart’s Horse March 1827

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VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

TO WIT

COMPLAINT  of Mr Simion Lord of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land Dealer taken upon oath before me  one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s land and its Dependencies this twelfth day of January in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven which said informant on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say): –

on the seventh day of December last I had various articles of Merchandise the property of my Father Mr Simion Lord of Sydney in a store in Launceston on the afternoon of that day I left my store and went home to my then residence near the wharf about eight o clock that evening Mr Hugh McLeod my clerk and Shopman who I had left in the store came to me and told me the store had been broken open and several articles stolen therefrom I immediately went to my store in company with Mr Peter Broadfoot and discovered that a wooden bar by which the Door of the store were usually fastened had been sawed in two pieces it had been cut through in the centre directly opposite the place where the two half doors closed when they were shit to I examined the Goods in the Store and found that four pieces of blue woollen kerseymere containing about fifty five yards three pieces of black

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kerseymere containing about forty five yards two pieces of drab coloured kerseymere containing about thirty one yards ten yards of olive coloured Pelisse Cloth one piece of coarse blue cloth containing about nineteen yards and two Remnants of coarse blue cloth containing eight yards were missing.

When I left the store that afternoon I told Mr McLean to fasten the Door of the store and come to my Residence to hie Tea, he came to my lodgings about six or seven o clock and went away about an hour afterwards he said he was going to the Store where he usually slept, this piece of blue kerseymere is of the same width the same colour the same quality and it general appearance is the same as the blue kerseymere that was stolen from my store this piece of black kerseymere appears to be exactly of the same description as that I lost from my store I have sold several pieces of black kerseymere about the same

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length as this piece but I never sold so great a quantity as this piece of blue kerseymere except to Mr Micklejohn Mr Charlton bought about six yards Mr Micklejohn bought a whole piece about twenty yards I never gave any away any kerseymere of this description. Mr William Smith sold the kerseymere to Mr Charlton on my account I sold the piece that Mr Micklejohn bought.

H.Simpson JP (Signed)  S..Lord jun (signed)

The examination of Donald Micklejohn of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land Tailor taken upon oath before me one of this Majesty’s Justices of the peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies the sixteenth day of January in the year of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and twenty seven in the presence and hearing of Thomas Jackson duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in his possession five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney knowing the same to have been

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stolen which said deposeth on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say)

Between three and four months ago I purchased a piece of blue kerseymere of Mr Lord I never sold or gave sway any of that kerseymine without its being first made up into clothes

H.Simpson JP (signed)

Donald Micklejohn (signed)

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Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of    THOMAS JOHNSON  of  LAUNCESTON                in Van Diemen’s land          taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the TWELFTH   day  of  JANUARY  in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty SEVEN in the presence and hearing of THOMAS JACKSON  duly charged before me upon oath

FELONIOUSLY receiving and having in his possession five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney knowing the same to have been stolen.

which said deponent on     oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):-

on the twelfth of December last about ten o clock in the forenoon I saw Thomas Jackson near the Public House kept by Mr Towers of Launceston he appeared to have something very bulkey about his body I went up to him and said I want you come in here we went into Mr Tower’s House I told him I should search his person he appeared confused I found about two yards and a half of Black kerseymere in his Hat and under a duck frock which he then wore and wrapped round his body I found apiece of blue woollen cloth about five yards this is the blue cloth and the smaller piece in the

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black cloth or kerseymere the said Jackson had about this Person they have not been out of my presence since I said I believe this is some of the cloth that was stolen from Mr Lord you had better tell me where the rest is to be found Jackson replied it is no use asking me any questions I shall not tell you any thing I immediately took the Prisoner to the Police Office

H. Simpson JP (Signed)

Thos Jhonson (signed)

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Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of    Mr HUGH MC LEAN  of  LAUNCESTON                in Van Diemen’s land          taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the SIXTEENTH   day  of  JANUARY  in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty SEVEN in the presence and hearing of THOMAS JACKSON  duly charged before me upon  the oath  of Simeon Lord and others with feloniously receiving and having in his possession five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney knowing the same to have been stolen

which said deponent on  HIS    oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):- about eight of clock on the evening of the seventh of December last I discovered that Mr Lords Store  had been feloniously entered and Sundry articles of property stolen therefrom amongst which were four pieces of blue kerseymere, I never sold or delivered any of that kerseymere, I left the Store a little before seven o clock that evening and went to Mr Lords House to Tea, and as soon as I returned I found that the cross bar which fastened the Doors had been cut in two and one of the Doors partly open all the Doors and the window of the store were fastened and secure when I left the store about

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seven o clock in the evening of the seventh of December, the kerseymere now shown me is of the same colours quality and width as the kerseymere that was stolen from Mr Lords store the kerseymere that was stolen from Mr Lords store had been brought there only a few days before from Mr Smiths Shop

H.Simpson JP

High McLean (signed)

The examination of Mr William Smith of Launceston in Vane Diemen’s land Shopkeeper taken upon oath beforeme one of His Majesty’s Justices of the peace for Van Diemens’s Land and its Dependencies this sixteenth day of January in the Year of Our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and twenty seven in the presences and hearing of Thomas Jackson duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in his possession five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney, knowing  the same to have been stolen which said Deponent on

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his saith aforesaid deposeth and saith as following that is to say in the month of September last I received some blue kerseymere from Mr Lord to sell for him on Commission, sometime in the early part of December I delivered Mr Lord all that  remained on hand. I never sold any in larger quantities than three yards except one piece of six or seven yards to Mr Clarlton I have not had any of that description of kersey mine in my Shop except which belonged to Mr Lord for the last twelve months.

H Simpson JP (signed)

William Smith (signed

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The examination of John Moulds of Launceston in Van  Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me, one of His majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its dependencies this eighteenth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven in the presence and hearing of Thomas Jackson duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in his possession five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney knowing the same to have been stolen which said Deponent on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say) about three months ago I received some narrow woollen blue kerseymere from Mr William Smith on account of Mr Charlton I cannot say how many yards but there were two jackets and a pair of trowsers made of it I saw the kerseymere before it was taken from Mr Smiths it was about three quarters of a yard wide I did not myself receive it from Mr Smith I told Anthony Jones to go and get as much cloth as would make two jackets and a pair of trowsers.

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the jacket I have now on is one of them I had from Jones by its appearance I think it is made of the same cloth I bought of Mr Smith I received it from Jones as one of the jackets I had requested him to make I have the trowsers at home. William Fitzgerald had the other jacket. I was present when he got it from Jones.

H Simpson JP (Signed)

John Moulds (signed) (large unused to writing hand)

The examination of Anthony Jones Tailor of Launceston in Vane Diemens Land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemens Land and its Dependencies the eighteenth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven in the presence and hearing of Thomas Jackson duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in his possessions five yards of blue woollen cloth the property of Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney, knowing the same to have been stolen which said Deponent on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows that is to say: – between two and three months ago John Moulds and William Fitzgerald requested me to make them a suit of clothes each about ten days or a fortnight afterwards William Fitzgerald

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accompanied me to Mr Smiths where I got some Blue cloth it was narrow Yorkshire cloth I do not know how many yards our of that cloth I made a jacket for Fitzgerald and a jacket for John Moulds I delivered them separately to each party, the clothes were made of the Dance cloth that I received of Mr Smith when I cut the cloth up I found that I was deficient  of three quarters of a yard which quantity I afterwards obtained of Mr Smith of that cloth it would take three yards and a half to make a double breasted Jacket it would take a like quantity to make a pair of trowsers. There was a remnant remaining after the clothes were made up little better than a yard

H Simpson JP

AL Jones (Signed)

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Thomas Jackson

decided

G Sessions

20th Feb 1827

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Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of   MR HENRY DAVIES   of   LAUNCESTON                in Van Diemen’s land          taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the TWENTY EIGHTH   day OF DECEMBER     in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty SIX

which said deponent on   BLANK oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):-

About six o clock last Tuesday evening Robert Rayner came to my bar and delivered me a bundle tied in a black silk handkerchief  which I threw down upon a sofa in the bar for the first time that evening I saw Robert Lee who was close behind Rayner Constable Crother came in immediately afterwards and asked me if any one had given me a bundle I said yes and gave him the Bundle I had received from Rayner he opened it in my presence it contained a piece of black cloth. Rayner wore a straw hat ad a light jacket when he delivered me the Bundle and went into the Tap Room with Lee immediately afterwards I followed them in about two minutes Rayner was gone. Crother remained in my Car about an hour when Rayner returned to the Tap Room I called to him and he came to the Bar Door I said to him you had better take your bundle away, he looked at Crother and said what Bundle I replied the Bundle

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left here he said I do not know any thing about any Bundle he was then dressed the same as when he left the Bundle, he immediately went out at the front door I called to Lee and asked him if he knew the name of the man who gave me the Bundle he replied no I know nothing of any Bundle Crother then took charge of the Bundle half an hour afterwards Rayner was brought back to my house by some constables he then wore a blue jacket and a black hat – when Rayner gave me the Bundle he said will you be good enough to keep this Bundle for me a few minutes (X) I did not ask Lee if he was the Person who had left the Bundle with me

HDavies (signed)

PA Mulgrave (signed)

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An Examination of John Crother of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies the twenty eighth day of December in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty six in the presence and hearing of Robert Lee and Robert Rayner duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in their possession upwards of two yards of black woollen cloth for which they cannot satisfactorily account which said deponent on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows that is to say:

about six o clock on Tuesday evening I saw Robert Lee in Brisbane Street with something tied up in a black silk handkerchief I followed him he spoke to Ann Hardman at the door of her house and went from thence into Mr Davis’s Public House he went in at the Tap Room and I saw him speak to Robert Rayner there were two or three yards from the Door I stepped back and Lee came out at the door without any thing in his

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hand he came up to me and said will you have any things to drink I said no and Lee returned into the Tap Room I then went into Mr Davis’s House at the Door opposite the Bar and asked him if any one had left a bundle tthere he said I am very busy I believe there has I saw a Bundle exactly resembling that I had seen with Lee laying upon a Sofa in the Bar I said to Mr Davis is this the Bundle he said yes a man left it here just now you had better sit down a few minutes and I dare say the men will come for it. I sat down about a quarter of an hour went into the Tap Room came out again and when Mr Davis  said he could not see the man that left the Bundle. I asked him if he saw lee he said Yes but that is not the man who left the Bundle he was just behind him, a few minutes afterwards Mr Davis called to some Person  and said you had better take your Bundle away I d reply neither did I see the Person Mr Davis spoken to, he said the man show had left the Bundle was a tall think man with a light coloured jacket and a straw hat Henry Gibbons who was present said it was Rayner.

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John Rayner  in the custody of Constable Henderson soon after he then wore a dark coloured jacket and a black hat when I saw him speak to Lee at Mr Davis’s House he had on a light coloured jacket and straw hat I am certain is was Rayner I was about two yards from him.

John Crother

PA Mulgrave

The examination of Henry Givens of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land Labourer taken upon oath before me of His Majesty Justice of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies the twenty eighth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty six in the presence and hearing of Robert Lee and Robert Rayner duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having  in their possession upwards of two yards of black woollen cloth for which they cannot satisfactorily  account which said deponent on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows that is to say I was employed on the evening of last Tuesday waiting upon the customers of Mr Davis in his Tap Room I saw a tall thin man in a light coloured jacket and straw hat give something in a black silk handkerchief to

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Mr Davis I cannot swear it was Rayner I never said  it was Rayner.

PA Mulgrave  Hanry Givens

The examination of Alexander Henderson on Launceston in Van Diemens Land Constable upon oath before me of His Majesty’s Justice of the Peace for Van Diemens Land and its Dependencies the twenty eighth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty six in the presence and hearing of Robert  Lee and Robert Rayner duly charged before me upon oath with feloniously receiving and having in their possession upwards of two yards of black woollen cloth for which they cannot satisfactorily account which said deponent on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows I apprehended Robert Rayner in the Public House kelp by Mr Davis between eight and nine o clock in Tuesday night he wore a dark coloured jacket and a black hat.

PA Mulgrave (signed)

Aly Henderson (signed)

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Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The examination of     Mr Simeon Lord   of          Launceston         in Van Diemen’s land     dealer     taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies  the twelfth   day  of January  in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven in the presence and hearing of Robert Lee and Robert Rayner  duly charged before me upon oath  with feloniously receiving and having in their possession upwards of two yards of black woollen cloth for which they cannot satisfactorily account.

which said deponent on     oath aforesaid and saith as follows (that is to say):-

on the seventh day of December last my store in Launceston was feloniously broke upon and a quantity of woollen cloth and kerseymere the property of my father Mr Simeon Lord of Sydney stole thereform this piece of black kerseymere appears of the same quality and of the same manufacture as the kerseymere I lost this piece measures about two yards and a half I have sold several pieces of that length in Launceston.

H.Simpson JP (signed)

Simeon Lord jun (Signed)

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Rex vs Robert Rayner

Robert Lee

G felony

2 February 1827

p32 (Feb 1827 blue pencil)

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

Be in remembered that on the seventeenth Day of February in the eighth year of the Reign of Our Sovereign Lord George the Fourth of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith and so forth, James Belane Corporal in His Majesty’s 40 Regiment, Mr John Sinclair and Mr John Smith came before me Peter Archer Mulgrave Esquire one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for Van Diemen’s Land, and acknowledged themselves to owe to our said Lord the King to wit  the said James Belane the sum of forty pounds, the said John Sinclair the sum of twenty pounds, and the said John Smith the sum of twenty pounds, of good and lawful money of Great Britain, to be respectively made and levied of their several Goods and Chattels, Lands and Tenements, to the use of our said Lord the King, his Heirs and Successors, if he the said James Belane shall fail in performing the condition under written taken and acknowledged before at Launceston, the day and year above written.

The condition of this Recognizance is such, that if the above names James Belane shall personally be and appear before the first sitting of the Supreme Court of Criminal Jurisdiction at Launceston to answer to the charge of having assaulted Mr Richard Heaney on the twelfth instant and in the mean time be of Good behaviour and keep the peace towards our Sovereign Lord the king, and all his  liege, People, more especially towards the said Richard Heaney then this Recognizance to be null and void, otherwise, to remain in full Force and Virtue.

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17 Feb 1827

James Belane

to appear before the Supreme Court

p34 (July 1827 in blue pencil)

Van Diemen’s Land

to wit

The information of Mr Richard Heaney Merchant of Launceston who being sworn and saith between seven and eight o clock on the evening of the twelfth instant I was sitting in my House in Launceston when I heard a Noise outside I went to the Door and saw James Bellane an acting Corporal in the Fortieth Regiment in the Street opposite my House there was no Person near him, I heard him cry out “you bloody Convict Buggers, you bloody Chain Convicts” he was walking towards Mr Hulls and when near Mr Drummond’s House, two men came out of Mr Drummonds, and Bellane struck them both and a scuffle ensued I am certain neither of the two men struck him first, the Sentinel who was on Duty and Mr Hull  came our of the yard and endeavoured to get Bellane away, he laid hold of the Sentinel’s musket and struck him several times, a number of Prisoners had collected together, and I said to the Sentinel you had better endeavour to get this man (Bellane) away, or these People will Murder him, I went to Bellane and said you had better go in with the Sentinel these People are Mustering and will murder you he immediately called

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me a Convict Bugger laid hold of me by my shirt and endeavoured to strike me, I endeavoured to prevent him  and he then struck out I returned the blows Mr Bailey assisted to pull him away from me three or four soldiers came from the Barracks and endeavoured to take Bellane away he struck several of them they closed with him and took him towards the Barracks I saw one man strike Bellane before the Soldiers came up I do not know that Bellane had struck him previously they were quarrelling, three or four minutes after then Soldiers had taken Bellane away I was standing in my yard by the paling in front of my House when I saw several Soldiers running towards Mr Drummonds on the opposite side of the street, Bellane was in front of them and shouted out  now run every Convict Bugger through that you meet the Soldiers had their Bayonets drawn in their hands I did not see them strike any body they run after several Persons, one of the Soldiers run after Constable Boyle who run in at my front Door Boyle had previously stood opposite to my House Bellane followed the Soldiers into the passage of my House and threw open my shop Door and went in towards the bed Room Door where my wife was in bed and who had been confined a few hours before I said to Bellane you

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are not going to make any noise here my family is in a state that will not admit of it he immediately struck me over the left eye and knocked me against a shelf we scuffled for some time when several soldiers rushed into the shop and one of them struck me with a bayonet upon the fore finger of the right hand and whilst Bellane and I was scuffling one of the soldiers wounded one me in the Palm of my left hand he stood behind some other soldiers and as he was striking at me with his bayonet I attempted to lay hold of it and it was then I was wounded every one of the soldiers  except the serjeant struck me with their Bayonets and they took Bellane away I forced my way into my bed Room armed myself with a Blunderbuss and should have shot some of the soldiers  if I had not been prevented by Doctor  Landale and the Serjeant who wrested it our of my hand my wife and Children as well as the Nurse were screaming at the time the bed Room Door was fastened inside when Bellane went first to it Constable Boyle was standing quietly in the Street when the soldiers ran towards him and one of them ran after him into my House I had not previously seen Boyle interfere with any of the Soldiers I saw all the Soldiers except the Serjeant run towards the Barracks the Serjeant did all he could

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to prevent me from being ill used I otherwise verily believe I should have been massacred this is the shirt and these are the trowsers which I wore last Night, they were clean and whole before Bellane first struck me last Night the Shirt was torn in the scuffle with Bellane I did not see any Constables present during the Part of the affray near Mr Drummonds Gate I delivered this shirt and trowsers to Constable Boyle this morning, Bellane was very drunk, there was much abuse between Bellane and his People he struck near Drummonds.

Signed Richard Heaney

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of February 1827

signed TC Simpson

signed PA Mulgrave

p38

The information of Mr William Young Master of the Brig Industry who been sworn saith about eight of clock (or a little before) last Night the twelfth instant, I was in the House of Mr Richard Heaney in Launceston when I heard a considerable noise in the street near the house of Mr Heaney and I went our at the Door and I saw several Soldiers on the opposite side of the street one of them said damn every Convict in the Country run every convict you meet through the Body, Mr Field, Captain Heaney and I were standing at Mr Heaney’s Gate, Constable Boyle was near and said it is a shame that no body will go and report the conduct of these men at the Police Office, one of the Soldiers who had a drawn bayonet in his hand ran at Boyle, Boyle ran into Mr Heaney’s House the Soldier after him and several soldiers after them all the Soldiers had drawn bayonets in their hands Captain Heaney ran into the House after the second or third Soldiers there was a scuffle in the passage of the House, I did not see what took place there the Soldiers came our of the House in about five or seven minutes, they were followed to the Door by Captain

p39

Heaney who has a blunderbuss in his hand, one of the soldiers I do not know which attempted to take the blunderbuss from him and Mr Heaney gave it up to Doctor Landale, I did not hear any Person abuse the Soldiers during the affray.

Signed William Young

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of February 1827

signed TC Simpson JP

signed PA Mulgrave JP

The information of Mr Edward Bailey who being sworn saith between seven and eight o clock last night the twelfth instant I saw James Bellane near Mr Drummonds Gate he was much intoxicated and was calling a man named  BLANK  a bloody convict  a double Ironed convict, there were twelve or fifteen persons near, some of them scuffled with Bellane and one of them knocked his cap off and I saw some Money fall from it Bellane stooped to Pick it up and two other men also this caused a scuffle and Bellane fought with three men alternately at one time two of them were upon him, and once

p40

I saw three upon him. Bellane went inside Mr Drummonds Paling and said I will fight any bloody Convict or any double ironed Convict in the Country, Captain Heaney was at this time standing in front of his own House I went to him and went into Mr Heaney’s House and in a few minutes after I heard a considerable Noise in the street I went to the Door Mr Heaney then said good God is it possible that a Man is to put up with all this and my Wife ill I will go and give that fellow in Charge there were a number of persons assembled on the opposite side of the street amongst which was Bellane he was exclaiming what are you but a bloody set of Convicts, Captain Heaney went up to him the Sentinel who had been on Duty at Mr Hull’s was standing close to Bellane and endeavouring to keep him quiet. Mr Heaney said to the Sentinel take this fellow to the Guard House or let him be taken to the Watch House or he will be killed by the People, Bellane immediately struck Mr Heaney and they fought I ran across the Road to them there were then two of the  Soldiers endeavouring to drag Bellane from Mr Keaney into

p41

Mr Hull’s yard Bellane had hold of Mr Heaney by the throat one of the two Soldiers who had muskets took his Bayonet off and struck at Mr Heaney with it. Mr Heaney had then hold of one of the Posts of Mr Hull’s Gate, and the Soldiers struck at Mr Heaney’s hand as he held himself fast by the Post and I immediately after saw Mr Heaney’s finger bleeding, I separated Bellane and Mr Heaney who went over to his own House soon afterwards our or five soldiers came up and endeavoured to take Bellane away he made considerable resistance but they at length took him towards the Barracks, about twenty minutes afterwards I was standing near Mr Fields House and heard some persons say the Soldiers have rushed Heaney’s House there was then a considerable noise in the street I ran towards Mr Heany’s and saw Mr Heaney with a carbine or blunderbuss in his hand near his own door in the front yard and a soldier endeavouring to take this Blunderbuss from him, there were several other soldiers present with Bayonets in their hands and a Serjeant who was endeavouring to quiet them, I took the Blunderbuss

p42

from Mr Heaney and the Soldier Doctor Landale came up at the time, I presented the blunderbuss at the soldier and told him I would fire upon the first man that attempted to use his Bayonet, and the Serjeant then succeeded in getting the Soldiers away.

Signed Edward Bailey

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of February 1827

signed TC Simpson JP

Signed PA Mulgrave JP

Extract from the Police records at Launceston 17th February 1827 James Bellane a Corporal in the 40th Regiment charged with assaulting Mr Richard Heaney on the 12th instant to find sureties for his appearance before the Supreme Court of Criminal Jurisdiction.

p43

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of   Thomas Archer Esq JP of  Norfolk Plains in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before  me, one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies this twenty fourth Day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven which said informant, on his oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):-

on Sunday the fifteenth day of April instant, James Roberts one of my assigned servants left my farm and remained away all that night and did not return till Monday 16th day of April at about 1 or two o clock in the afternoon – I have long had reason to suspect that my men have been harboured and supplied with spirits by John Hodgetts a worthless fellow at Norfolk Plains and this suspicion was confirmed by some information   which I received on the 16th instant from Mr Charles Reid who stated to me that James Roberts had been seen coming drunk from John Hodgett’s House that morning that Roberts had come down to his farm and that he Mr Reid had heard him Robert complaining to his /Mr Reid’s/ men that while he was drunk at Hodgetts House Hodgett’s sons had robbed him of his shoes and some other parts of his dress. Mr Reid further told me that his own men were frequently made drunk at Hodgetts House and that my men were they very frequently on Sundays and Sunday nights and that Mr William Whyte had seen them there drinking. I therefore pray that justice may be done

Tho: Archer

PA Mulgrave JP

margin:

orderley

booked

Roberts

C: Reid  (signed)

W Whyte (signed)

W. Myers (signed)

1st May

p44

Thos Archer Esq

v

John Hodgetts

Harbouring convicts

24th April 1827

dismissed 5th May 1827

p45 (July 1827 in pencil)

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of   George Hull of  DepartConsseral???  of Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before  me, one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies this twenty third Day of July in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven which said informant, on his oath aforesaid, deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say):-

I verily believe from information obtained from a credible source that certain forged papers purporting to be Bills drawn by Deputy Commissary General Wenyss on the Lords re commissary of His Majesty’s Treasury are secreted in and upon the House or premises of Richard Naylor of Launceston aforesaid together with the plate from which the said Bills were obtained or printed

Geo: Hull sens

p46

Plea vs R Naylor

23rd July 1827

p48 (July 1827 in blue pencil)

The information of Joseph Parker who being  sworn saith, I am a Constable and was on Duty in the Gaol at George Town on Sunday the twenty fourth day of July instant; about four o’clock in the afternoon I heard a noise resembling a rap at the Gaol Gate, Charles Berry said there is a knock at the gate, I opened the Gate, there was no person there, whilst I was refastening the Gate Berry laid hold of me, I cried out, Berry put his hands before my mouth, Henry Bridge came up and struck me a violent blow on the right side of the Head, with the head of an axe, the Blow knocked me down; James Holmes came to my assistance, Bridge threatened to strike him with the axe, Bridge, Berry, John May and John Mason, all prisoners ran out of the Gaol Gate, they were sloe together when Bridge struck me, I pursued them until I saw some Soldiers go after them and then returned to the Gaol, the Irons of those four men had not been examined since the preceding evening they went to church that morning, I was the only Constable on Duty at the Gaol that day; no person remained in Charge when I left the Gaol, I was not long away, I left nine Prisoners in the Gaol, they were there when

p49

I returned.

Joseph X Parker

his mark

Sworn before me at George Town the twenty seventh day of July 1825 (1825)

(no signature)

The information of James Holmes, who being sworn saith, I am a constable and was confined in the Gaol at George Town last Sunday; about four o clock in the afternoon I was in the Gaoler’s House, and heard a noise in the yard and Joseph Parker came out; I ran into the yard, I saw Henry Bridge with an axe in his hand near the outer gate, and parker lying on the Ground and his head bleeding, Mason, May and Berry were close to the Bridge, I cryed out Soldiers! Soldiers! Murder! Murder! Bridge said, If you don’t hold your tongue I will cut your bloody head off, he lifted up the axe as if to strike me, I drew back and he, Mason,  Berry and May ran out the Gate; I ran to the Barracks and gave the alarm, then followed Mason and stopped him till the soldiers came ands took him; Mason had Brickbats in his hand, and I took up others; I then went with the soldiers in pursuit of the other three about half a mile into the Bush, I saw Constable Joseph Watts    lying upon May on the Ground,

p50

Bridge  kicked Watts several times, May got away from Watts, and ran with Bridge some distance before they were taken by the Soldiers.

James Holmes (signed)

Sworn before me at George Town this twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

The information of Joseph Watts a Constable who being sworn saith, I was at the Lumber Yard at George Town about four o clock last Sunday afternoon, Thomas Banks was with me, I heard the cry of Murder in the Gaol, and saw John May, Henry Bridge, John Mason, and Charles Berry run out at the Gate; Banks and I pursued Bridge, may and Berry about three quartes of a mile, I overtook May first, Bridge was a little way before him, May said something, Bridge replied, never mind I will cut his Bloody Head off before I will be taken, I threw May upon the ground and in the struggle fell upon him, Bridge kicked me several times ion the Head and side when I was down; May got away from me and ran off with Bridge, I got up land followed them I heard someone cry out, I saw Charles Mc Kergan a Private of the Fortieth Regiment coming up May and

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Bridge then stopped and  Kergan and other Soldiers went and took them, Berry was at that time about thirty yards on the left, in custody of Thomas Banks, I was unarmed

Joseph Watts (signed)

Sworn before me at George Town this twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

p52

The information of Charles McKergan a Private of the Fortieth Regiment of Foot, who being sworn saith, an alarm was given last Sunday afternoon that some prisoners had escaped from the Gaol at George Town; I pursued John Mason, James Holmes, was running after him about twenty yards before me, James Holmes was gaining upon him, I passed Holmes, and told Mason I would shoot him if he did not stop, he did not stop till I got within eleven yards of him, I did not see him or Holmes take up Brickbats, I did not see any in their hands, I sent Mason back to Gaol in Custody of Thomas Spyron ?? and went with  Holmes after Bridge, Berry and May, Joseph Watts and Thomas Banks were pursuing them several yards before me, I saw Watts thrown May down and fall upon him, Bridge and Berry kicked

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Watts several times; I threatened to shoot them if they did not stop, Bridge ran off, May got away from Watts and followed Bridge two hundred yards before I overtook him, I passed his some distance and took Bridge into custody, Berry ran off to the left and was taken by Thomas Banks, some other soldiers came up and we took Bridge May and Berry back to Gaol; I struck Bridge as he went into Gaol with my piece on the shoulders, the Blow broke my Bayonet I struck in the heat of passion, he made no resistance; we made them run back to the gaol as fast and they could, and I believe some of the soldiers pricked them with their bayonets as they ran; I struck Bridge several times with my piece on is was to the Gaol.

Charles  X  Mc Kergan

his mark

Sworn before me at George Town this twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

The information of Thomas Banks a convict and a carpenter in the Public Works at George Town. Being sworn saith about four o clock on last Sunday afternoon, I heard the cry Murder in the Gaol, I saw Charles Berry, Henry Bridge and John May ran out at the gate in one direction and John Mason in another; Joseph Watts and

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pursued the three first about three quarters of a mile, Watts knocked May down and fell  upon him, Bridge kicked Watts whilst he was upon May; Berry was twenty yards from them, I pursued and took him, I made him lay Down till the soldiers came up; May got away from Watts and ran after Bridge, a soldier pursued and took them; some other soldiers came up, and made the prisoners run back to gaol  as fast as they could, and pricked them with their bayonets as they ran, because they would not run so fact as the soldiers wished they should* May laid down twice and said he was not able to go on so fast, Bridge was pushed down over by Kergan, because he did not go on quick enough.

Thomas X Banks

his mark

Sworn before me at George Town this twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

Mark Wilson being sworn saith, I am Chief Constable of George Town, and I on Sunday last did the Duty of William Longhurst the gaoler who was at Launceston; all  the prisoners were at church on Sunday morning I examined all their Irons when they returned from Church they were all secure, when Henry Bridge, John May, John Mason and Charles Berry were   brought back to the Gaol in the afternoon I again examined them Bridge had not any irons on, I found his irons in the Gaol, the leads of the rivets had been violently broken or knocked off

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May had no irons, they were in the Gaol, the Barils had been bent; the chains of Berry’s irons had been cut, apparently with an axe or some heavy instrument, he had one on both barils on; Mason had his irons on but the chain had been broken with some heavy instrument they told me they struck off their irons with an axe, Constable parker was quite sober that afternoon, Bridge,  Berry and Mason were confined in Gaol under sentence of transportation and May charged with stealing a cash note.

Mark X Wilson

Mis mark

Sworn before me at George Town this twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

Thomas Bolt Private in the Fortieth regiment being sworn saith, I was at the Canteen on Sunday afternoon, I heard the cry of Murder in the Gaol, I ran to the Gaol Gate, there several Prisoners standing there, I particularly remarked Cornelius Mahonny, Joseph Brown, Johns Murply. IN enquired if there was any constable there, one of them said no, I ordered them to go into the yard they returned immediately; I fastened the Gate, and remained there a few minutes  till Mr  Mark Wilson same, I was not armed.

Thomas Bolt (signed)

Sworn before me at George Town this Twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

p56

The information of Jane Longhurst being sworn saith I am the wife of the Gaoler at George Town Joseph parker was the constable on duty there last Sunday afternoon about 4 o clock, I saw him opening the Gaol Gate, Henry Bridge went up to him and struck him a violent blow on the Head with the back part of the head of an axe, parker fell down, cried out and attempted to get up, Charles Berry put his hands before Parker’s mouth and pushed his down, Berry then unfastened the gate and Bridge struck at parker again with the axe but I believe missed him; Bridge, Berry, John Mason and John May then ran out at the Gaol Gate. Bridge took the axe with him which he Dropped some distance from the gate, I ran to the barracks and gave the alarm then picked up the axe which I saw Bridge dropped, it is the property of the crown, I saw the blow struck and the prisoners ran out the gate through the window.

Jane Longhurst (signed)

Sworn before me at George Town this Twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

p57

The information of William Kenworthy Esquire Inspector of Public Works who being sworn saith, this axe is the property of the Crown it is worth 5 shillings.

W Kenworthy (signed)

Sworn before me at George Town this Twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

The information of George Lonsdale Gooch a convict who being sworn saith, I am overseer of the Hospital at George Town, I saw Joseph parker at the Gaol last Sunday afternoon, there appeared to be a contused wound on his right jaw, and one small cut inside the right ear, I believe the wound was caused by some heavy blunt instrument.

George L Gooch (signed)

Henry Bridge had a Bayonet wound in the muscle of his right arm, John May had a Bayonet wound in his loins  one quarter of an inch deep and Charles Berry a similar wound low down on the right side. Their wounds were all so trifling I had only occasion to dress them once.

Sworn

p58

Sworn before me at George Town this Twenty Seventh day of July 1825

(unsigned)

p59

rex v

John May, Henry Bridge, John Mason, Charles Berry

committed July 27 1825

CODE (military?) AG e

8th August 1825

p60 (Bushranger Dec 1827 in pencil) Aboriginal children[i]

Cornwall Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information of oath of John Cable who deposeth and saith between twelve and one o clock yesterday I was at the farm of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the Tamar where I have lived as overseer for the last three months. Mrs Hooper the housekeeper and a little first were upon the premises, I was in the House with the child when Mrs Hooper ran in and said oh Cable, Cable here are the black fellows. I went to the Door aft and at the Threshold a tall man quite naked his face and whole person covered with blue mud met and presented a gun at me and said stand back and I immediately laid hold of the muzzle of the gun with my left hand and shoved it from me and nearly shoved him down with my right hand, he jumped up and I known him down, he got up again and struck me a blow in the face which knocked me down I still kelp hold of the Gun, he kicked me in the belly, I still held the Fun and he shoved me about with his feet and cried our to a man who was behind  us diguised in the same ways as himself who was shorter wore a pair [?] of fustian trousers and had a double barrelled piece in his hand shoot the Buggers.

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This he repeated a dozen of times whilst we were struggling and at last the shorter man fired at me as I laid upon the Ground and wounded me just above the left elbow when I was compelled to let the Gun go during the struggle we had got fifty feet from the House and when the tall man got the Gun from me he went into the House and the shorter one stood at the Door the tall one took a large hammer into the house with him and as I laid  bleeding upon the Ground I heard the sound of blows as if upon a board, I then heard the report of a Gun and the tall man ran out of the House to the short one and said am I shot is there any blood upon my shoulders, he said no, the tall one picked up a broad axe and went into the house again I got up was going away when the short man laid hold of me and shoved me into the mens [?] kitchen six or seven rods from the house Samuel Taylor, one of my servants was in the kitchen with his hands tied behind him, the short man remained sentinel at the Kitchen Door, he soon afterwards brought in John Berry, another of my master’s servants and made him kneel down with his face to the wall, soon afterwards John Coffee and John B/G/Crowther two other of Mr Griffith’s men came to the House in a Bullock Cart .

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The two armed me told them to do into the kitchen or they would blow their brains out – after Crowther and Coffee had been in the kitchen about half an house the armed men ordered Crowther to get the Bullock Cart – he went our and about five minutes afterwards I heard the tall man cry out drive on, drive on as fast as you can, they ordered out Taylor at the same time with Crowther, I heard the cart drive away and the tall man then said to us in the kitchen stop in here for half an hour or I will blow your brains out, Mrs Hooper and the little Girl were put into the kitchen a few minutes after me, when the armed men and the cart had been gone about half an hour, I went into the House and examined the door which separated the [2] outer room from [1] the bed room had been broken open, two or three bags of sugar, seventy pounds of Tobacco, forty pounds of tea, sixty pounds of bacon, two silver watches, some musket balls, four muskets, one cutlass, one Bayonet, all my master’s and Mrs Hooper’s clothing, two pairs of Blankets, A Rug, a patchwork quilt had been taken away, all belonging to my masters except Mrs Hooper’s clothing, also a blue superfine cloth jacket my property and some clothes belonging to John Berry, also which articles I am certain were in the House when

p63

the armed men came there. Samuel Taylor returned to the house about an hour and a half after he went away. There was also a tin can and about three gallons of wine taken away. I saw John Crowther at my master’s between five and six o clock this morning who said the men who had taken him away had tied him to a tree and poured win down his throat until he was intoxicated, I did not hear him say how he got his hands untied, both the armed men were white men I do not know them that I ever saw them before I should know them if I were to see them again by   their voices and features the taller was thin about five feet ten inches high dark hair and whiskers his visage not very long and projecting a middling sized mouth, his nose not very long and sharp a high projecting forehead his eyes not very large and darkish, I do not know their exact colour; they were rather sunk in this head, his cheek bones were rather high his voice was rather sharp, he did not look to me to be above one or two and twenty years old he had long but slender limbs his whiskers were bushy – the shorter man was about five feet four inches hight and slender, he had light hair and whiskers which were small his face was long and rather narrow a sharpish chin

p64

but not projecting, his nose was rather long and hooked his mouth rather small his eyes full and grey his eyebrows small his forehead not high but narrow  and straight, his cheek bone rather high his voice soft. The tall man frequently swore and made use of the phrase by the holy ghost, I thought he spoke like an Irishman the short one like a Londoner

signed

John

X His mark

Cable

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth say of December 1827

Signed PA Mulgrave

The further information of John Cable  who saith the men who robbed my master’s house on Friday had their heads and bodies plastered over with dark blue clay, there is blue clay in a water hole near where John Coffee was fencing very like what they were disguised by and there is plenty of clay near the banks of the Tamar of the same description.

Signed

John

X His Mark

Cable

Sworn before me at Launceston the twentieth day of December 1827

Signed PA Mulgrave

p65

The further information  on oath of John Cable who saith I am quite certain that Charles Williams now present is one of the men who robbed the house of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the 14th day of Last Decembers. he is the person who shot me in the arm he was close to me whilst I was struggling with the other man for upwards of ten minuted I had a full view of his countenance during the whole of that time and once afterwards when he stood sentinel at the kitchen. I heard him speak whiles he was so standing. I know it was Charles Williams by his voice as well as his countenance I do not know that I ever saw Charles Williams before the robbery or since until now.

signed

John   his  Cable

X

mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the sixth day of February 1828 and read to him before he put his mark to it in the presence and hearing of Charles Williams as well as his former information

signed

PA Mulgrave

p66

The information on oath of Mrs Jane Hooper free who deposeth and saith I have resided at the House of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the west bank of the Tamar about three months, on Friday morning last this fourteenth of December Mr Griffiths left home to go for Launceston between 11 and twelve o clock that forenoon I heard the dogs bark I went our of the House but could see no strange person near. I returned into the house again the dogs continued to bark and I went to the door of the house two or three times at length I saw two men close to the house and coming up to the Door, one of them was quite naked except a grass band which was round his head hid body and face were smeared all over with black mud and crossed in several places with something white, he had either a stick or spear in his hand the other man that was with him had his face and part of his body blackened in like manner down to the waist band of a pair of fustian trowsers which he wore, he had no shoes on stocking s or nor any hat or cap he had some grass round his head he had a musket in his hands, they were tall men the man  that was completely? naked was the tallest, John Cable an old man who had lived with Mr Griffiths a great many years and a half cast girl about seven years of age were the only persons

p67

in the house with me when the strange men came up to the door. I cried out to Cable here are the natives what shall I do. Cable  rushed towards the door and seized hold of the musket that was in the hands of one of the disguised men which was painted towards the door. Cable and the man struggled together I then went into an inner room and shut the door, there is a loft over that room. I told the Girl to get up into the loft she did so and I handed her up two muskets and a fowling piece, they were all loaded. I got up into the Loft after securing the room door, after I had been in the loft about ten minutes I heard the report of a gun close to the house just before the gun went off I heard the voices of two persons say shoot the white bugger, the voices of the two persons were like the voices of two men I have frequently heard before, one of them I had seen several times in Launceston but I do not known either of their names, soon after I had heard the gun go off I heard some person shaking the door of the inner room and some one said bring the axe and the door was then broken open I fired one of the muskets out of the loft over the Door that was broken open and the shot

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passed through the outer room and through the outer Door of the House I then took up the other musket intending to fire upon the first man who might force his way into the inner Room I remained in that position about a quarter of an hour when Samuel Taylor a free man in Mr Griffith’s employ called to me and told me to come out and not be afraid. I asked him if any person was hurt if Cable was hurt and who was there he again said pray come out of the room do not be afraid no one will hurt you, bring no fire arms with you, I put down the musket went to the Door of the Room and the disguised man who wore the trowsers was standing at the Door with an axe lifted up in one hand and a hammer in the other hand he said something to me which I did not hear distinctly – followed by come out, I then perceived a third man disguised like the other two but shorter and who wore a pair of blue trowsers he had a double barrelled Gun in his hand the man struck at me with the axe, I saw the blow coming stooped down under his arm and scaped it. The shorter man then said do no murder her now leave it until we are going, that man then ordered me to go to the mens hut and went with me, I saw Taylor

p69

with his hands tied behind him, he was ordered to walk into the hut just before me and to kneel down with his back to the Door, Cable was also in the Hut with his hands tied, soon after John Berry, another of Mr Griffith’s servants was put into the Hut ordered to kneel down and had his hands tied, John Coffee, a prisoner holding a ticket of leave was then brought in and made to sit down in one corner, the short man remained sentinel at the Door and threatened to shoot me but said after I had begged him not to do so he would not hurt me if I would be quiet, I heard a noise like the breaking of Boxes and ran to the Door, the sentinel said go back do not come so close to me, I then saw Mr Griffiths cart drawn by four bullocks and driven by John Brow then come up to the Hut the sentinel again ordered me into the Hut and John Brother went in with me I did not hear any one order him to go in he was laughing and tying his whip to its stick, I heard the sentinel say something to him which I did not understand, I asked Crowthers if he did not see the men before he came

p70

to the houses, the sentinel told me to be quiet, or he would blow my brains out, the sentinel then ordered Crowther to come our of the Hut I thought they were going to shoot him and I begged him not to do so, he said he would not shoot him or any one else if they would be quiet, the sentinel then order Crowther to taken the cart to the Door of the House, about ten minutes afterwards the disguised man with the fustian trowers came to the hut pointed his musket at me and said “By the holy ghost” you have nearly taken my life and said the   sentinel “Keep them in the Hut” stop here half an hour. I heard the cart driving away and begged the sentinel not to destroy my clothes he said he would return everything that was of no use to them both Mr Griffith’s and mine by the bullock drivers, they ordered Samuel Taylor to go with the cart, the sentinel left the door of the Hut soon after the cart was driven away I went out of the Hut about ten minutes after he was gone and went to the house the boxes and drawers in the house had been broken open, four guns, four or six musket cartridges, two bags of sugar, a whole chest

p71

of tea part of another chest a hundred weight of bacon (two dozen and a half of white cotton shirts, four white Marseilles waistcoats, one yellow waistecoat, four striped waistcoats, two pair of dark coloured cloth trowsers, two pair of striped cotton trowsers, six pair of white trowsers, three coats, two of them blue the other black, one blue cloth jacket, once striped cotton jacket, and two white cotton jackets, a good many of the shirts were worked in the bosom . I made them myself and could swear to them, one pair of leather boots a pair of shoes two pair of blankets two Rugs, six or seven pair of cotton sheets, four bolster cases, one dozen of wooden handle skinning knives, six silver table spoons, six silver tea spoons, all marked JH and a tin can containing three gallons of wine, one silver watch with a gold chain, and a gilt silver French watch, a repeater also with a gold chain, a piece of striped cotton from ten to twelve yards long, all the property of my Jonathan Griffiths had been taken away as well as a red staff plaid gowns, eight or nine white muslin Gowns, four or five white muslin spencers a black silk spencer a red silk spencer a pink silk crepe  Handkerchiefs with a red border, a white red lens handkerchief; about a dozen cotton shifts,

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seven or eight white muslin petticoats, one plaid silk crape skirt, one black silk skirt, one plaid stuff skirt, one pair of leather shoes, four or five muslin caps, four coloured silk handkerchiefs) all my property were gone. I could swear to the whole of shoes articles, I made them myself, there was also a dark olive green cloth pelize and a patch work counter pane likewise my property  taken away: – Samuel Taylor returned about an hour and a half after he went with the cart with his hands tied behind him, I do not recollect what he said – about five or six o clock the next morning John Growther returned, he said “they had tied him down in the Bush and made his tipsy and driven the cart and Bullocks away themselves” he had with him a Rug in which were tied up five of my white gowns, one black silk shirt, two white petticoats, three shifts, two white skirts belonging to me which had been stolen the day before, together with six silver table spoons, and three silver tea spoons belonging to Mr Griffiths, I asked Crowther if that was all he had brought back he said yes, that he had begged hard for them and was glad to get them” I asked

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him if he had anything else belonging to Mr Griffiths he said no, I have not, this happened soon after he returned, there were two constables there they asked Crowther if he had brought any thing else back he said no, I told Crowther that I was certain that he must have had more things to bring back for they would not have picked the things he head brought back from the rest, I did not see him searched by the constables, – Coffee and Crowther came into the Hut nearly together.

The naked man was about five feet nine inches high, slender made, black hair, black whiskers and I think hair under the shin but I am not positive, along and narrow countenance, a high projecting forehead, large full eyes, I do not know their colour, a hooked nose high in the bridge a wide mouth thin pips a very narrow chine rather long high cheek bones, I did not hear him speak he had a heavy look, the man with the fustian trousers who had the scuffle with Cable was a little shorter but not much than the first, he was thin but a stout boned man, he had black hair, he had a long broad countenance a high projecting forehead, grey eyes neither very large or small, a nose short turned up and rather sharp

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at the end a wide mouth in anything rather out than in, a sharp chin, and rather projecting, he was thin in the lower part of the face, but broad in the upper part; his voice was rather rough , he spoke sharply with an irish accent, he appeared about five and twenty years old, he had short whiskers, the shortest man of the three was about five feet two inches hight, brown hair slender made round countenance the forehead not very high, and narrower than the rest his of face middling sized dark blue eyes, a short sharp nose rather turned up a sharp short chin  rather retreating, middling sized mouth lips rather thick, he spoke like a Londoner, with a soft voice, he was well spoken, cheek bones rather high, he seemed quite young, he had no whiskers. I only saw the man who was quite naked for a moment at the Door I did not see him afterwards – Crowther did not appear the least intoxicated when he returned home on Saturday morning, the two armed men appeared to treat Crowther more gently than the other men who were put into the hut; they made all the rest sit or kneel down and threatened

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to blow their brains out, they did not make him do so or threaten him.

Signed

Her

Jane

Hooper

X

Mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the nineteenth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

Information on oath of Mrs Jane Hooper who deposeth and saith in December last I resided at the farm of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the Tamar about five miles from Launceston on a Friday about 7 weeks ago his house upon that farm was robbed by two men and I was examined the following Wednesday before the police magistrate respecting that robbery and I am quite certain that Charles Williams was one of those men, he was the shorter man of the two and stood sentinel  over me and others (Mr Griffiths men) at the door of the men’s Hut with a double barrelled gun, I know him by his voice, his countenance and his person, I am positive that he is the same person, I have not the least doubt about it. I do not know that I ever saw him before that time or since

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until now, on the day of the robbery I was close to him for above an house and he spoke frequently during the time

Signed Jane  Hooper

Sworn before me at Launceston the second day of February 1828 and read to the defendent in the presence and hearing of Charles Williams

Signed

PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of Mrs Jane Hooper who saith, I do not know that I ever saw Charles Williams before the day that Mr Griffiths house was robbed, I was going out at the Door of the police office on last Saturday, when I met him Williams and immediately knew him, I followed him into the office and told the police magistrate that was one of the men who robbed Mr Griffith’s house

Signed Jane Hooper

Sworn before me at Launceston the second day of February 1828 and read to the defendent in the presence and hearing of Charles Williams as well as her two former informations/

Signed

PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of John Coffee a prisoner holding a ticket of leave, who deposeth and saith, I am in the service of Mr Jonathan Griffiths of the Tamar, last Friday the fourteenth of December instant I was employed fencing about three quarters of a mile from his House along with John Barry, John Crowther brought a load of split  stuff there about 8 o clock in the morning from a place about three quarters of a mile in the bush, he brought two other loads that forenoon when he brought the third load John Barry went home to get dinner ready and I stopped with Crowther until the Cart was unloaded and then went with Crowther w towards Mr Griffith’s house, when we had got within ten or twelve rods of it, I saw a man standing by the kitchen door. he had two pieces in his hand; and another man with a piece and a bayonet upon it near the houses, both the men’s bodies were naked down to the waist and blackened as well as their faces one of them had a coat on, I heard Mrs Hooper crying out and said to Crowther these are the Blacks, the man with the musket and bayonet rushed towards us presented his

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musket and Bayonet at us and said if you do not come here immediately I will blow your brains out, he made me march into the kitchen and Crowther with me, they did not then tie  my hands or Crowthers, John Cable, Mrs Hooper, Samuel Taylor, John Barry and a little fire were in the kitchen, none of those persons except Taylor had their hands tied. Crowther took his bullock whip into the Hut with him  – I did not see any  forks, spades or hoes in the Hut – One of the disguised men was much taller than the other, the shorter one stood sentinel at the gut door and when we had been in about ten minutes. the tall man some which is the bullock driver?  some one said Crowther, the tall man said Crowther, the tall man said  come out, Crowther went out, after they  had been gone about ten minute sone of the strange men ordered John Barry to tie John Cable’s hands, and ordered Samuel Taylors and after he  had been gone some time one of the strange men told us is we put our heads outside the door he would blow our brains out.

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I heard the cart drive away and about fifteen minutes afterwards I untied my own hands, I believe John Barry untied his hands himself , Taylor had not tied our hands fast, – when it was Crowther brought split stuff out of the bush to where I was at work he passed within sight of the nearest water hole to Mr Griffith’s House and I dare say there is a blue clay there, but I do not know, I have taken water out of it several times.

Signed John Coffee (signed)

Sworn before me at Launceston the twentieth Day of December 1827 and read to the depondent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed

PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of John Coffee who saith I saw Charles Williams at the House of Mr Laughton Whyte two or three times about six months ago, I recollect when Mr Griffith House was robbed in last December by two men the taller of these men freed me into the Kitchen and as I was going into the Kitchen the shorter one turned

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away from me and I did not see his face whilst he stopped there I do not know that that man was Charles Williams

Signed John Coffee

Sworn before me at Launceston the sixth day of February 1828 and read to him before he signed it in the presence and hearing of Charles William as well as his former information

signed PA Mulgrave

The information on oath of John Barry free by servitude who deposeth and saith I have been employed on the farm of Mr Jonathan Griffiths during the last three months, John Coffee holding a ticket of leave has been working with me splitting and fencing, Last Friday the fourteenth of December John Crowther was employed carting split stuff from the Bush to the place where Coffee and I were fencing, I saw him twice between breakfast and dinner, about one o clock on that day I left my work to go to the hut where I lived to get my dinner, I then saw Crowther coming with a load of Split Timbers coffee went to meet him to shew him where to shoot his load and I went on towards our

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Hut which is about sixty yards from Mr Griffith’s House, when I had got near the Hut I saw two men one of them came from Mr Griffith’s House, and the other from the front of the Hut, they came up to me each had a piece one of them was naked the other partly so, their faces and bodies were blackened, I believe with blue clay, they ordered me into the hut and told me to turn my face to the wall and to kneel down or else they would shoot me, after I had been in the Hut ten minutes or a quarter of an hour Coffee and Crowther came into the Hut, Coffee came in first, and Crowther came in directly after, one of the disguised men stood sentinel at the Door, I do not know if he said anything   to Crowther or not; after Crowther had been about ten minutes in the Hut the sentinel told Crowther to go out, just before he was ordered out I heard Sam the Blacksmith (Samuel Taylor) say I am not the Bullock Driver this is the Bullock Driver – I am not certain whether one of the men I saw at Mr Griffiths House was quite naked or not I am not certain whether one of those men had a double barrelled gun or both had muskets, when those men brought Crowther to the Hut they did not make him kneel down nor did I hear them threaten him, I know that Crowther

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went to Launceston some time ago to complain against Mr Griffiths

Signed John Barry

Sworn  before me at Launceston the nineteenth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of John Barry who saith I have known Charesl Williams four or five years, I do not know that he was one of the men who robbed Mr Griffith’s House on the fourteenth of  last December I was afraid to look at those men lest they should shoot me, I saw Charles Williams at the House or Mr Laughton Whyte which is on the next farm to Mr Griffiths about three weeks before the robbery of Mr Griffiths House when he said he was going after the natives.

signed John Barry

Sworn  before me at Launceston the sixth day of February 1828 and read to him before he signed it in the presence and hearing of Charles Williams as well as his former information

Signed PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Samuel Taylor a free man in the service of Mr Jonathan Griffiths of the Tamar who deposeth and saith on Friday the fourteenth instant I was in my masters kitchen between twelve and one o clock when two men came there they were naked down to the waist bank of their trowsers, blackened over with mud, one of them wore a pair of duck trowsers and I believe the other wore a p air of dark coloured trowsers but I am not certain they were both otherwise naked except a bank of straw round their heads the man with the duck trowsers was a short man and had a double barrelled Gun in his hand the other was a very tall think man he carried a fowling piece the tall man stood at the kitchen door whilst the short one came into the kitchen and tied my hands behind me with a piece of rope, and forced me before them to Mr Griffith’s House which is about thirty yards from the kitchen, John Cable came out he and the tall man scuffled they both fell two or three times at length the tall man cried out “fine, fine” shoot the white Bugger the

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short man fired and wounded Cable in the right arm, Cable continued laying upon the ground the two disguised men then entered the House took up an axe and broke open the Door of an inner room, a Gun was then fired from inside, and the tall Man who had broken open the Door ran out and said to his companions do you see any blood upon me? they then made me go into the House and when there I said to Mrs Hooper who was somewhere in the inner Room don’t fire mistress, some out, and they will not hurt you, the disguised men told me to say so, but did not threaten me if  I refused to call Mrs Hooper out, I was much frightened at the time and I thought that was the best way to act my mistress /Mrs Hooper/ came to the Door the tall man was standing close to the door and was making a blow at her with the axe when the short man jumped between them and caught hold of his arms and stopped the blow, and said “I will not take lives” they then took Mrs Hooper, Cable and I to the kitchen and the little black girl, and the short man stood sentinel over us they made me stand with my head to the wall and made Cable sit down on a Box in the corner

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some time after that John Barry was brought into the kitchen and his hands tied and in about half an hour John Coffee and John Crowther were brought into the Kitchen nearly at the sae time they made Barry kneel down and made Coffee sit down, Crowther came in with a ship in his hand, they did not tell him to lay that down, nor did I hear them order him to sit or kneel down, the handle  of the whip was about as big as my middle finger, I did not see Crowther laugh when he came into the kitchen, I did not hear the Sentinel speak to him, about ten minutes after Crowther was put in the kitchen, the long man said bring that man here with the velveteen jacket on, and Crowther went out, and came in again, they then asked for the Bullock Driver and Crowther went our, ten minutes afterwards the short man untied my arms and said you must come along with us I went our and saw the cart standing near the House Door, and Crowther was standing along side the Bullock, I saw there were two muskets, two bags of sugar, a chest of tea, and two large bundles, one tied up in a Rug, the other in something white, thee might have been more Bundles in the cart

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but I did not see them, the short man went with me to the art and the tall man stood near the kitchen, the short man said to Crowther “drive on, and to me go along side that man” pointing to Crowther when we got about fifty yeards from the Houses the tall man came up to us and said drive on, both the men kept behind Crowther aand I they ordered Crowther to drive straight along across the Bush towards the hills, when we had got about three wuarters of a mile from the House the long man said which is the best Bullock Driver I said he is pointing too Crowther, they then said to me sit down we must tie your hands and the tall man tied my hands behind me with a piece of tanned leather, and made me sit down on a tree with my face turned towards the way we had come, he then gave me a drink of wine out of a Can and said stop here, he then ordered Crowther to drive on, the cart went towards the Hills, they did not tell me how long I was to stay there, when the cart was out of sight I got up and went home, they did not threaten to shoot me or Crowther as we went, we saw no one on the road, I did not hear them converse together.

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the tall man was about five feet eleven inches high, very slender very long limbs, I do not recollect the colour of his hair, he had a long countenance rather oval high forehead, narrower that the other part of his face, not very large eyes rather sunk in his head, I do not know their colour, I do not recollect his mouth, he had a sharp chin that projected a little out, he spoke like an Irishman, he was quite a young man, the short man might be five feet four inches high not very stout, light hair, countenance rather full, I do not remember the shape of his fore head, or the colour of his eyes, he had a longish nose rather sharp, a full mouth and rather a narrow chin, he had a softish voice and spoke like a Londoner, he appeared about one or two and twenty years old. John Crowther came home the next day soon after day light he said that took him into the Bush and tied him to a tree and gave him some wine and made him drunk and that he had to beg hard for the things  he had brought back for Mrs Hooper, he said, that when they had tied him to the tree and gave him some wine they drove the cart away I did not hear him say how he got loose from the tree he

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was sober when he came back. O think I heard the voice of the tall man once before about four years ago at William Griffiths at Norfolk Plains and I believe his name is Bevan.

Samuel X Taylor

his mark

Sworn  before me at Launceston the twentieth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of Samuel Taylor who saith I am certain that Charles Williams was one of the men who robbed the House of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the 14th of last December he was the man who tied my hands, I saw him and different times for upwards of an hour during that day and I heard him speak several times I knew that man was Charles Williams by his size shape  and voice  as well as his countenance.

signed Samuel X Taylor

his mark

Sworn  before me at Launceston the sixth day of January  1828 and read to him before he put his mark to it in the   presence and hearing of Charles Williams as well as his former information.

Signed PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Charles Ashton a Constable belonging to the Band of Field Police who deposeth and saith I was on the farm of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the left Bank of the Tamar all last Friday night, John Crowther came there about five o clock on Saturday morning he  had a Bundle tied up in a rug which he said the men who had robbed the house had sent back, Mrs Hooper asked him if those were all the things he had brought back, he said yes,. and I was obliged to beg very hard to get them, Crowther appeared to be stupid and begged to have a cup of tea, after that I went with him about a mile and a half behind Mr Griffiths and he said he was trying to find the place where he had slept all night, he said the men who had taken him away from mr Griffiths had tied him to some thing from which he could not get away and had poured wine down his throat, he searched for the place whence he had slept  all night about two hours, but could not find it, James Burton and young Mr William Griffiths were with us, Crowther and I were first and going up a Hill when he pointed out the track of a cart we followed it until we got about two miles from Mr Griffith’s House, and there found Mr Griffiths cart fixed between some standing trees and the pole broken there were some marks upon the ground as if the Bullocks.

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had stood there some time, struggled and broken away, Crowther went away with young Mr Griffiths and Burton and I searched about the Bush until about ten o clock when we returned to Mr Griffiths House, Mr Griffiths ordered us to take Crowther into custody as Crowther and I were leaving, Mr Griffiths House in the morning, and when about a quarter of a mile form it. I said to Crowther have you got any thing else belonging to Mr Griffiths, or do you know where there is anything else belonging to Mr Griffiths, he said no nothing, except this watch chain two seals and a key attached to it, along with the turret /pendant/ which he took out of his pocket in a in a small hairy pouch, and delivered it to me they have not been out of my possession since and they are in the same state in which I received them from him. Crowther told me that the men who took him away when they tied him took the cart away and returned with it about three hours afterwards put the things in it which they said were for Mrs Hooper and left it there that the place were he slept which he could not find was about a  hundred yards from the cart, that the men came to him there

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and told him they had brought the cart back and left the things in it, and that when he awoke in the morning he saw the cart standing with the things in it he had taken back to Mrs Hooper and this chain seal  key and turnett, in the body of the cart. I examined the ground about where we  found the cart and I am certain it had been taken farther  than where we found it, or we should have discovered the tracks, Crowther did not tell me to what he was tied of how he got loose.

signed John x Ashton

his mark

Sworn  before me at Launceston the twentieth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of James Burton a constable who deposeth and saith Ii was at the House of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on Friday morning last a little before five o clock, John Crowther then came there with some articles in a rug,  which he said the men who had taken him away had send back for Mrs Hooper, she examined them and asked him is there were all he had brought he said they were and that he had to beg very hard for them. I did not see Crowther deliver any thing to john Ashton I went out with Ashton Crowther and William Griffiths we searched for the place where he said he had slept the night before we found the tracks of a Cart we followed it and found Mr Grifffiths cart, soon after Crowther came to Mr Griffith’s that morning he told me that the mend who had taken him away had tied him to a tree and opened his mouth with a stick and poured wine down his throatm which set him asleep that when he awoke in the morning he was close to the cart.

Crowther got some tea

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I then told him he had better shew me the place where he had slept he begged me to let him sleep for half an hour, when we went in search of the place where he said he had slept he took us in the different direction from the place where we found the cart and when we found it Ashton asked him to point out the place where he said he had slept Crowther looked round and said I do not see it Crowther appeared stupid and said his head ached when he came to Mr Griffiths

Signed Jas Burton

Sworn  before me at Launceston the twentieth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of mr Joanthan Griffiths who deposeth and saith I have a farm on the left bank of the Tamar I left it last Thursday morning and did not return until Friday afternoon when I went away I left this gold watch chain these two seals , watch key, two rings and this pendant attached to a gilt silver watch, in on of my Draws. They are all my property the chain and the two rings were worth forty shillings at least.

I know the place where John Coffee was fencing, on my farm last Friday, and I know the place from whence John Crowther had to fetch split stuff to John Coffee, the road between these two places led within sixty yards of the nearest waterhole to my house in which there is very dark blue clay the bottom and sides of that hole are all of dark blue clay, no person would get water out of that hole without seeing that the sides were of dark blue clay, that hole was distinctly visible from the road I have before mentioned.

signed J Griffiths

Sworn  before me at Launceston the twentieth day of December 1827 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of John Crowther

Signed PA Mulgrave

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The examination on oath of John Crowther a convict, who saith I was late in the service of Mr Jonathan Griffiths of the Tamar one day about a fortnight before last Christmas I think about the 14th or 15th of December I was returning  from my work to M Griffiths Premises in company with John Coffee, we were going to dinner I had a cart and bullocks with me when we got near the House I saw two armed men near it, one of them a tall man came up to us and told us to stand, he had a musket or fowling piece in one hand and a pistol in the other, he made us go into Mr Griffith’s kitchen where we found Mrs Hooper, Samuel Taylor, John Barry, a little Girl, and John Cable who had been wounded in the arm, there was an armed man standing sentinel at the Door his body and face were besmeared with mud, as were also the body and face of the other armed man; after I had been in the kitchen five or ten minutes one of the disguised men said which is the bullock driver some one said I was, and one of the armed men called Taylor and I out of the

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kitchen and made me drive the cart up to the House where there were four or five large bundles tied up in blankets and rugs laying outside the House and a Bag of sugar which the tall disguised man ordered me to help him lift into the cart the other disguised man remained sentinel at the kitchen Door the tall man put the Bundles into the cart as soon as the cart was loaded he ordered me to drive into the Bush, Taylor went with us after the had got six or seven hundred yards from the House the disguised man who has stood sentinel at the kitchen door overtook us they made me drive on about two miles into the Bush they sent Taylor back before we got so far, they tied my hands behind me with a piece of string (small rope) and tied my legs also with a piece of similar rope and made me sit down on the ground, they forced me to drink some wine and the tall mad said stop there until we come back with the cart, there until we come back with the cart, they then went away with the cart. I do not know in what direction, it was then about five o clock in the afternoon, just as it got dark, the tall man came and untied my Hands and roused me, I had been asleep and was drunk with the wine I had drank, he freed me to drink some,

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more wine I saw my cart and Bullocks near me, II got up and tried to walk but was too drunk. I feel down again and went to sleep, I awoke about an hour before day light, the moon was shining, I sat down upon a  tree until day light, when I searched for my cart and Bullocks, I found the cart jammed amongst some trees the pole was broken off and the Bullocks gone there was a Bundle in the cart tied up in a Rug and a silk handkerchief and a watch chain and some    seals I do not know ho many, I do not know if they were gold or not, I took the bundle and the handkerchief home and gave them to Mrs Hoopers the chain and seals I put into the Trowsers pocket and gave them to Constable Ashton during the forenoon, I was so stupid with the wine I had drank that I forgot to give them to Mrs Hooper with the Bundle, The tall man wore a coat but I believe was otherwise naked, the short man had a pair of ragged trowsers on, but no other article of clothing, the tall man appeared about thirty years old, and the shorter man looked to be younger, when I was in the kitchen I looked at the short man when he said if you look this way

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I will shoot you, I think that was the only time he spoke to me, he and his companion spoke together as I was driving the cart into the Bush, but I was kept at too great a distance from them to distinguish their voices I did not see sufficiently, the countenance of the short man to know him again I did not see the front of his face at all, I should not know either of the men again, I think I might know the taller man again, I have known Charles Williams about two years and nine month he lived near to Mr Griffith’s farm, I have many times made tea for him there, when he has  been looking after cattle, I had not seem him for upwards of a month before the date on which Mr Griffith’s House was robbed, I did not see him on that day, I do not think he was one of the men who robbed the House the shorter man was stouter than Charles Williams I never sat Charles Williams undressed

John X Crowther

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the ninth day of February 1828 and read for the Deponent in the presence and hearing of Charles Williams

signed PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Robert Wainwright Owen Esquire of Launceston Surgeon who deposeth and saith I know John Cable he applied to me about the fifteenth of December last having received a wound in the left arm immediately above the elbow upon examination it appeared to me to be a gunshot wound caused by two or more Buckshot, the wound was superficial I did not consider it dangerous I attended him about three weeks at the end of which time it was nearly healed there was not short lodged in the arm

signed Rt Wt Owen

Asst surgeon

Sworn before me at Launceston this thirty first day of May 1827

signed PA Mulgrave

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copies of informations on Charles Williams

sent originals to A.G.

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The further information on oath of Mr Jonathan Griffiths who deposeth and saith I left me House on the banks of the Tamar on the fourteenth of last December L left a quantity of sugar in my house the whole of which was my property also a whole chest of Tea and half a chest of tea also my property. I returned the same night and found that three bags of sugar worth two pounds per Bag and the chest and half chest of Tea worth seven pounds ten shillings had been taken away as well as a large quantity of wearing apparel also my property all the Tea that was in my House on the fourteenth of December was my property

signed J Griffiths

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of June one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight

signed PA Mulgrave

margin note illegible (same time) perhaps ‘not found’

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The further information on oath of Mr Jame Hooper who deposeth and saith the value of the different articles that were stolen form the House of Mr Jonathan Griffiths on the fourteenth day of Last December was as follows viz the red stuff plaid gown one pound, the eight white muslin gowns were trimmed with lace and worth three pounds each, the four white muslin spencers thirty shillings each, the red silk spencer two pounds, the pink silk crape handkerchief ten shillings, and the four coloured silk handkerchiefs ten shillings each

signed Jane Hooper

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of June 1828

margin note illegible (same time) perhaps ‘not found’

p103 (January 28 in pencil)

Cornwall

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information on oath of Edward Curr Esquire who deposeth and saith about nine o clock on the morning of the twenty eighth of October one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven I was travelling on Horseback  between the Lovely Banks and the Cross Marsh about a mile and a half on this side the House then occupied by Mr Whitfield when a man came out of the Bush between fifteen and seventeen yards from me and called out to me in a manner which induced me to stop I did not hear what he said he was dressed in a Grey jacket and wore a kangaroo skin cap I do not recollect the colour of this trowsers he had a musket in his hand   and the impression upon my mind from his dress and appearance was that he belonged to the Field Police until the presented his musket at me and said you must deliver your money or words to that effect he said have you any fire arms I said not he then desire me to get off the Horse I did so he again asked me if I had fire arms I shewed him I had nth he said you must give me your money I said well there is not help for it I took a few silver shillings out of my pocket six or seven and out of my memorandum book

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a one pound note of Messieurs Gellibrands Bank (I made a memorandum the number of that note in half an hour a forwards) I put the note upon the ground and the silver upon it I said this is all I have he replied oh nonsense you must have more I said I assure you I have not he then said I see you have a watch I must have that I replied you had much better  not take that for be assured it will lead to your detection he said never mind I repeated almost the same words and asked him if he was determined to take it he said yes put in with the rest. I said well if you must had it and put it on the ground it was a silver hunting watch by by Roskill of Liverpool number 29090 worth upwards of ten pounds it was my Property he then same towards my horses Head keeping his musket presented at and with a yard of me and desired me to turn my back I said you are not going to murder me are you he said turn your back Sir I said now do not murder me it will be an useless piece of cruelty if you cut me to pieces you will get no more I have no more he paused a moment and said there Sir I must

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have this horse I replied well I cannot help it he then said you must go a distance off sir I went away about twenty or five and twenty yards down the Road towards the Cross Marsh I stopped turned round and said that parcel strapped before the saddle contains papers that are considerable value to me and can be of no use to you I will be glad if you will put them on the ground he examined the parcel and put in on the ground he mounted the Horse and rode away towards Jericho  at a trot about the time that I put the money on the ground he said if you do what I say I will not fire about the same time I asked him if he knew me he said no I do not I do not know if his Gun was cocked. I did not know that he had either a cartouche box or bayonet – it was a Brass mounted musket and I think the Barrel was not Bright My horse was a Dark Brown horse I verily believe that John Maltwood was the man who then and there robbed me in the manner I have described but I cannot swear it is him I saw him standing in the street of Launceston this morning I looked hard at him and he at me with

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the greatest earnestness possible. He appeared confused remarkably so he was soon after by my request brought to the Police Office. I there heard him speak and from the tone of his voice accent height form and appearance particularly his eyes I believe and do believe he is the man who robbed me from the circumstances of his being a Police Man and his statement at the Police Office I supposed I was mistaken I left the Police Office about the same time that Maltwood did in company with Captain RL Hare. Maltwood joined us and walked by the side of us along the street and endeavoured to explain to me that he was not the man who robbed me I do not recollect the whole of what he said But I know he said I suppose you are Mr Curr who was robbed he said he knew my name by hearing me enquired for at Mr Hull’s by Captain Hare and seeing me come out of Mr Hull’s house immediately afterwards I asked him if he knew any person in the country most particularly like himself he said no. I am a different sort of man from that. I supposed he meant a different sort of man from a Robber, he then stated to me that the day after

PA Mulgrave

Edward Curr (Signed)

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I was robbed he brought the information of my Robbery from Mr Simpsons at Ross Bridge to this side of the Country there had been nothing said to him by me or at the Police Office previous to this conversation that would have led him to suppose that I suspected he was the man who had robbed me I remember that Maltwood said that Stebbings was with him at Ross when I was robbed, I did not observe any remarkable scar upon the face of the robber or that he had lost any of his teeth John Maltwood has an old and very remarkable scar on his cheek and appears to have lost some of his teeth I do not recollect if the man who robbed me had a check or white shirt or if he wore any neck handkerchief it is from the general form of John Maltwoods countenance particularly from his eyes the tone and accent of his voice and his size and height I am induced to suppose that he is the man who robbed me I was a good deal flurried at the time

Edward Curr (signed)

Sworn before me at Laucneston 31st day Jany 1828

PA Mulgrave

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The examination of John Maltwood who saith I recollect bringing some cattle belonging to Captain Malcolm Laing Smith from Mr Bryans at Jericho to Norfolk Plains the latter end of last year James Stebbings went with me from Norfolk Plains we left a letter with Mr Simpson the Policed magistrate at Ross as we went that night we slept there the next night we slept at Mr Harrissons the following night at Lemon Springs and we got to Mr Bryan’s at Jericho the next morning between ten and eleven o clock and drove five head of cattle back that night to Lemon Springs the next day we drove to Mr Simpsons at Ross and stopped there that night the evening that we arrived at Mr Simpsons on our way to Jericho news came that Mr Curr had been robbed Stebbings and I had gone from the Punt on the South Esk to Ross that day we left Norfolk Plains the day before two Bullocks had just been drown when we arrived at the Punt and we stopped there to assist in getting them out.

John Maltwood (signed)

Taken before me at Launceston this thirty first day of January 1828

PA Mulgrave

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The examination of James Stebbings a convict belonging to the Band of Filed Police who saith, I left Norfolk Plains in the month of October with John Maltwood with orders from Captain Smith the Police Magistrate to proceed to Mr Bryants at Jericho that night we stopped at the punt on the South Esk until the next morning, they next day we got to the House of Mr Simpson at Ross and after we were in bed information arrived that Mr Curr had been robbed and I was sent with that information of Campbell Town

James X Stebbings

his mark

Taken before me at Launceston the second day of February 1828

PA Mulgrave

p110 (Bushrangers July 1828 in pencil)

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information and complaint of Mr Robert Corney of the Lake River County of Cornwall in Van Diemen’s Land taken upon oath before me one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for Van Diemen’s Land and its Dependencies this twelfth day of July in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight which said information on his oath aforesaid deposeth and saith as follows (that is to say) about eleven or twelve o clock in the night of Tuesday last the eighth day of July instant I was disturbed by the barking of Dogs but merely supposed it to be occasioned by some cattle having gone into the yard – I desired my son Robert to call one or the men to drive the cattle away and at the same time I went to the window afore of the back room and under the curtain to look  out when immediately a musket or fowling piece was thrust through the glass with the muzzle close to my body , some one at the same time threatening

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that if I did not instantly open the Door he would fire I retired into an adjoining room to consider what I had better do, in the meantime the person or persons outside had gone to the back Door of the House and were attempting to burst it open not having any fire arms in the House but two pistols and judging by the noise of voices outside that these were a number of men outside I thought it better on account of my family to admit them at once rather than to exasperate them by an ineffectual resistance, I therefore desired my son to open the door upon which three men all armed and one of them had a double barrelled Gun entered the House with their Guns presented towards me and immediately demanded my Money and plate saying that if they were given up to them they should not take any thing more. They then commenced searching for those articles and opened every Box in every room in the House, they stole from me one gold watch ( a French one value fifteen pounds), two silver watches value seventeen pounds one silver Basin

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and two silver cups value ten pounds six silver table spoons and twelve silver tea spoons value ten pounds a silver candle stick value two pounds two pistols value one pound and a quantity of Rings broaches and other articles of which I have not the particulars which they feloniously carried away. They also feloniously stole and carried away plate trinkets and other articles belonging to my sister to the value of fifty pounds – I only knew one of the three robbers his name is Joseph Moulds he was lent? home from the Public Works the Harvest before last to reap my Corn – these men remained in my House until three o clock in the morning, of Wednesday last the ninth day of July instant and then compelled one of my men named James Searles to put them across the   eastern side of the Macquarie River in my canoe – as soon as they were gone I ascertained that before these men came to my House they had secured and tied all the men upon my farm, who live in Huts at some distance

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from the house and had with their three muskets which the Robbers feloniously stole and carried away . It unluckily happened that the fire arms which I usually keep in the House had been sent to town to  be repaired. I am informed that an assigned servant of Mr Robert Taylor his shepherd acted as guide to the banditti when they came to my House but whether he came voluntarily of was compelled I do so by the Robbers I cannot tell, I do not know his name.

Signed Robt Corney

sworn before this 12th day of July  1828

signed Thos Archer

Read in the presence of William Ashton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds the seventeenth day of July 1828 as confirmed by Mr Corney sigd  PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Mr Robert Corney of the Lake River settler who deposeth and saith  the information which I gave before Mr Thomas Archer on the twelfth instant and which I have now read is correct. The following articles were stolen from my house on the night of the eighth or morning of the ninth instant by the men already mentioned viz this silver watch the maker was a Jew in Wapping this gold seal with a cornelian stone engraved R Cy, this gold watch with a broken case  I last saw the silver watch in my bed room  about  a month ago, these two silver egg sups and these five silver table spoons marked R C, Joseph  Moulds took the five silver table spoons off a pair of drawers in my Sitting Room, the spoons are my property and were worth five pounds, Moulds also took these silver egg cups off the mantle piece they are my property and are worth two pounds I think Moulds put the spoons and egg cups into his pockets William Baker was in the room when Moulds took the silver

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spoons and egg cups and a manthe size of William Ashton stood at the Door, they were all three armed Mould had a Gun in his hand and two pistols in a Belt and a sword. Baker had also a Gun they remained in my House about three hours.

Robt Corney

Sworn before me at Launceston the seventeenth day of July 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of John Crowther as assigned servant to Mr Robert Corney of the lake River settler who deposeth and saith on the night of Tuesday the eighth of July I was in bed in a Hut about two hundred yards from my Master’s dwelling House when som emen entered the Hut I jumped out of Bed caught hold of a frying pan and said who are you are you soldiers or Bushrangers or what are you two or three voices said stand or we will blow your brains out, I laid down the frying pan and one of the men made a blaze at the fire and lighted a lamp, I then saw John Gibson, Joseph Moulds and William Baker, they were each one armed with e Gun and Moulds had a large pistol Moulds put down his Gun and tied my Hands he tied me, he called out to two men who were in the service of Mr Reid whose names I do not know and James Searles a Ticket of Leave man who were all in the Hut and tied their hands likewise baker and Gibson stood over us with Guns Baker said there is two Guns in here is there not I said yes one f them is mind, they searched about the Hut

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and took away one musket belonging to me and a musket belonging to Mr Corney, they took away likewise two knapsacks one of which belonged to Daniel Hollowwood Mr Corney’s assigned servant the other one to Mr Reid’s men, they made us fast two together back to back William Ashton was also there he stood at the Door with a Fun in his hand he pushed into the Hut three men two of which belonged to Mr Corney the other to Mr Fletcher one of them had his hands tied  behind him the other two I believe were bound in the Hut by Moulds, Gibson then stood sentinel at the hut Door and the other three Bushrangers went towards my master’s House William Ashton came twice to Gibson and asked if all was right and one of those times he had a Bundle which I thought was tied up in a handkerchief, he took to   the Paddock Gate about two hundred yards from the Hut and gave it to some other man who I did not know and of whom I had only a slight view, Baker, Moulds and Ashton  then

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returned to the Hut after being absent about three hours and a half Moulds said who understand the Board best we want to go across the water I said Searles they took him with them and Moulds said so soon as he Searles came back he could untie our hands, I have known Joseph Moulds upwards of twelve months he had nothing over his face that night I have know Ashton for six months and seen him frequently the greater part of his face was uncovered that night I have seen john Gibson nine or ten different times during he last twelve  months and have known him intimately his face was uncovered that night – I have seen William Baker twice or three times during that period his face was uncovered that night and I am certain I am not mistaken in the persons of either of those men. This is the musket that Baker took from my bedside, it is my property and is worth five and twenty shillings I know it by this piece

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of iron by which the stock has been mended

signed

John Crowther

Sworn before me at Laucneston the seventeenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

signd PA Mulgrave

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The information of James Searles who being first duly sworn saith I am one of Mr Robert Corney’s servants and hold a Ticket of Leave. I resided with my master upon his Farm at the junction of the Macquarie and Lake rivers – about half past ten o clock last night Tuesday the eighth of July extant three armed men rushed into the hut where I was sitting reading and one remained at the Door who was also armed they brought in with them three of Mr Corney’s men with their arms tied behind them, they then tied me and five other of Mr Corney’s men all of whom were in bed except myself and then two of the Gang remained in the Hut with us standing over us with pistols and cutlasses and the others went away in the direction of the House about three or half past three o clock this morning the two men who had gone to the House returned to the hut with some Bundles which they stowed away in their knapsacks, they then loosed my arms and desired me to put them across the River Macquarie in my master’s canoe. I put them across and they  went off in a direction for the Hummocky Hills

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I then went up to the House and then saw Mr Corney who told me that there had been three men there all armed and that they had taken away all the watches, plate and money they could find and desired me to go immediately to Mr Joseph Archer’s with a note, which I did and from thence came to Woolmers I knew one of these mend he was formerly a servant of Mr Abraham Walker’s his name is Joseph Moulds, the others I never saw before but Crowther who is gone to the Police Magistrate at Norfolk Plains knows two of them. These Robbers did not cross in Mr Corney’s canoe to get to the House, I do not know where they crossed butt think the Macquarie River is fordable at Simpson’s farm when these men rushed into the Hut they took three muskets which were there and after they had loosed me and packed up their knapsacks one of the men was desired by the rest to take the Guns, he took two or three Guns up and went away towards Mr Fletcher’s House and one of the Gang who was at the Hut called after him “tell them to go round” the man was away

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about ten mionutes and returned with only one Gun bringing with    five kangaroo dogs.

James Searles

Before me this 9th day of July 1828

Tho Archer

The further information on oath of James Searles who deposeth and saith. The foregoing information has been read to me it is true I am certain that William Baker was one of the men  who came into the hut armed with Joseph Moulds on the night stated in my former information it was on a Tuesday night, I did not see the face of the third man he was about the height of John Gibson he wore a blue jacket I do no know what trowsers

signed James Searles

Sworn before me at Launceston the 24th day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

signed PA Mulgrave

p123

information

William Ashton

William Baker

John Gibson

Joseph Moulds

robbing Mr Corney’s  House

8th July 1828

Information of

Robert Corney

John Crowther

James Searles

p124 (July 1825 bushrangers in pencil)

copies

William Ashton

William Baker

John Gibson

Joseph Moulds

information of

Eliza Dunnon

John Dunnon

Thomas Evans 2

John Ashley

David Gray 3

William Frazer

Tristian Fenning

Thomas Baker

Fitzherbert Coddington

John Hargrave

Robert Percival

Joseph Gray

Charles Smith 2 + 3

Thomas Gatter/Catter

Henry Hinksman

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The information on oath of Mrs EIiza Dunnon wife of John Dunnon of the South Esk River Bricklayer who deposeth and saith on the night of Friday the  eleventh of July I was in bed with my husband in out house Thomas Evans a Labourer was in bed in the adjoining Room I was awoke by the dogs barking my Husband called out to Evans and said Tommy look out at the window and see who is there Evans said who is that  someone outside the House said will you give us a light of the pipe Evans said if there is any fire I will give you a light a person outside said open the Door first I then head the Door open and soon heard the voices of several persons in the House some one said are you the Master of the House Evans said no and called out to my Husband Jack you are wanted my Husband said cannot you give the people a light without my getting up Evans said give us the lamp out there was a Lampo in our bed room but not light my Husband got up and gave Evans the Lamp and followed Evans

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into the outer room, I then saw a light in that room and heard some one say this man is Jack Dunnon my Husband said cranky is that you some one said yes it is, Dunnon said I am sorry to see you here the person replied it is a matter of form me being here, one of the strangers said is there any one else here Dunnon said only my wife and my two children they then said have you   got any thing  to eat Dunnon said yes but a little meat and a little flour and tea and sugar they then said we have plenty of tea and sugar and said to Evans make us a fire and let us have something to eat for we are very rvous?? Dunnon said I suppose you are very hungry they said yes we could eat a bit of you a  good fire was then made and Evans cut up some meat and I heard it frying on the fire, I could hear some whispering amongst them at times for about twenty minutes when one of them said Dunnon have you got any grog in the House Dunnon said I have not I have

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not had a drop in the House for a good while, one of the men said we will soon have some, Gibson cut open that knapsack and I soon heard a noise like the placing of bottles upon the table and one of them say come Dunnon drunk Dunnon said I will taste with you one of them said some you runk and Evans said I thank you all the same I never did drink  they said Dunnon will your wife have a drop, Dunnon said I do not think she will have any they replied take a drop and make it hot for her Dunnon soon after brought me some spirits I refused to drink it he took it back and said my wife will not drink, they said will you have a little more, Dunnon said you want to make me drunk, I then heard a noise like the placing of a cup on the table and a little while after I said Dunnon is there any fire one of the strangers said yes here is a good fire I said I shall get up for I am almost frozen I got up and saw four strange men in the room William Ashton William

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Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds two of them setting some distance from the fire and the other two were walking about the Room the latter two had each a Gun in their Hands (Moulds and Baker) as soon as I saw them I said good morning, and one of them who was sitting down added I suppose you do not know me now Mrs Dunnon, I said indeed I do he said it is a good while since you saw me now, I said it is about twelve months, I knew him as soon as I saw him his name is John Gibson, he lived with Frank Field when I lived at Mrs Smiths the oldest man (Ashton) said to me sit down he got up and I sat in his place, they then handed the grog about, they had three or four bottles with rum, they had three knapsacks and two Bundles tied in Handkerchiefs or shawls, I saw them take some things out of one knapsack  and put into another I thought it was to make their loads even, the things I saw were wearing apparel like shirts and jackets and trowsers. I did not  see the two Bundles opened

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I saw them have several watches they frequently pulled out of their jackets to see what time it was; Before I got up I heard one of the men say to my husband will you buy a watch my husband said I have not got any money I have only ten shillings in the House the man replied you shall have it for that as you are an old friend of mine and I have know you so long in Hobart Town and Launceston – after they had placed the things in the knapsacks they had some more grog to drink several times, they often asked me to drink but I refused, they almost forced my husband to drink but I begged of him not to get drunk, they talked a great deal about the Gaol about being hanged and the misories they had suffered in government employ they said they did not care how soon they were hanged, Dunnon said Walker’s Blacksmith is in Gaol for the Majors Robbery the woman has sworn to him I said we hear the woman has sworn positively to him one of the men said if she has sworn to him she has taken a false oath is he committed I said I do

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not know they said let us be taken when we will we will clear him, he knows no more about it than the child that is to bear if the Majors people and the woman do not mind what they say we will give them another rousing, the oldest man said there is Johnny Fawkner he has not behaved as he should do I will venture my life into Launceston for him they took it in turns to walk about the Room like Sentinels, the oldest man William Ashton asked me if I wanted to buy any shawls or silks or any thing of the kind I said I have got no money, Dunnon made me a signal to go into the bed room I followed him there, he told me not to buy anything or take any thing from then, we returned into the outer room again and in a short time Ashton brought it up again about the shawls and the things they have got I again said I do not want any he said come you might as well have one we do not want money we want Dunnon to get us some flour if he can, he again said Mrs Dunnon you may as well have one of these shawls I tell you we

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do not want money, we want flour I said I do not want any I brought plenty such things with me into this country Ashton replied did you  come free then I said I did he said you may as well have one I shall not charge you much for it and went towards the two bundles. I said you need not open them I will not have it, I have got plenty, I did not see either of the bundles opened by the time it was day break and Dunnon said it is almost day break, Ashton said I suppose you want to get shot of us but we are not going yet, soon after one of them said to Ashton come we must go it will not do for us to be here in the day Ashton again said we are not going yet; another of them placed the knapsack nearer the door and said we must go Ashton said I am not afraid of being seen on the hight road and soon after called Dunnon on one side I could not hear their conversation Dunnon then said I will speak to my wife and called me to him and said to me in a low voice they want me to get them  some flour Ii said if you can get a chance go and take a Bag with you as soon as you get to

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the old Captains ( Barclays( tell him they are here. I then said to Ashton come you here he came to me I said to him what is this you want? you want Dunnon to get you some flour, he cannot get any before nine or ten o clock it will not do for you to be here at that time of the day, he said we are not afraid to be seen upon the high road by any Body by day, I said let you go when you will you know we must report it, he looked angry at me and said, what business have you to report it, I said it will not do for us to get our necks into the Halter for any one, he again said you have no business to report it, I was afraid to say any more to him, Dunnon gave me a nudge and said to Ashton I will get you some flour he said if you can get it by nine or ten o clock that will do, we do not intend to leave the House before that time, Ashton said to Dunnon go and get it and be sharp back Dunnon got a Bag and left the House they then tied Evan’s Hands behind him one of them opened the window shutter and looked out towards Captain Barclays, Gibson sat down upon Evan’s bed with his gun and

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Ashton sat down by the fire and began to talk to me, he said before I go I will make you a present of some things,  another of the men said Dunnon is a long time I think he is going to deceive usm I said he will be coming directly, Coen? the shoemaker’s man then came to the Door opened it and entered the House and asked me to lend him an iron pot. I told him to take it he was going away with it when one of the four men said stop you are not going yet you are our prisoner as long as we stop here, they then tied his hands behind him the Dogs about the Hose soon after barked and ran from the House Moulds looked out at the door and said they are on us stepped out at the Door and fired off his piece the man upon the bed got up and rushed out accompanied by a third man, I heard the report of half a dozen guns one after the other, Ashton ran to the Door with his double barrelled Gun returned into the House and ran about the roo frequently, looking,, through the cracks of the boards, he said, I see I am taken and said to me I insist on your going into

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your bed room and stopping on your bed; I did so he then put the three knapsacks and two Bundles under Evan’s bed and pulled a kangaroo rug which was upon the bed down to hide the things the then came into my bed room and walked up and down the room, about twenty minutes after one of Captain Barclay’s men called York came close to the House and said Eliza are you in I said “yes, York” Ashton turned round and said to me you hold your tongue, or I will blow your brains out. York (Hargrave) said is there any one in, I said come in and see, he said if non of you will go in I will go in, and see the woman, I heard the Door open Ashton got under my bed immediately with his double barrelled piece and pulled the bed clothes down to the floor. Hargraves then same to  my bed room and said is any one here I pointed under the bed and he lifted the bed clothes and said there he is and pointed under the bed and Frazer’s man immediately pointed a Gun under the bed and Hargraves pulled Ashton out from under the bed, Mr David Gray and some other persons

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then came into the House I am not quite certain who took the knapsacks away I saw Evans give one of them to Thomas Cutter, I think Mr Fenning took away the two Bundles and I saw some thing green something white and something red in one of them as if laid upon the tables. Before those four men same to my House there was no  knapsack in or about our House nor any fire arms – The Bushrangers brought two dogs with them one a white one and the other red and white.

sigd  Eliza X Dunnon

her mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 16th day of July 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p136

The information on oath of John Dunnan free by servitude who deposeth and saith I live on the south Esk River on a famr belonging to Captain Barclay on the night of Thursday the tenth of July I was in bed with my wife and no other person in the Hut besides Thomas Evans about twelve o clock I was awoke by the Dogs barking and heard some men talking outside I awoke my wife and Evans. Evans opened a window near his Bead and some one outside asked him for a light, Ecans said I will give you a light got up and opened the Door when four men came in, I was in an inner Room and did not see them some in but heard the voices of four men one of them said to Evans are you the Master of the House he replied no, one said where is he, Evans came to the Bed Room Door and said Jack you are wanted, I replied what do you want with me, cannot you give the man a piece of fire without my getting up, one of the men replied no we want you, I got up and went to the outer room and saw four strange men

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with each a musket in their hands and a knapsack on their back. I returned into my bedroom dressed myself and returned to them, the four men pulled off their knapsacks and one of then (William Ashton) said to me have you got any thing to ear, in the place we are damnation raw another of them John Gibson said get the pan underweigh cut up some meat and let us have something to eat, I cut up part of a forequarter of mutton and a man who I had seen before and knew by the name of cranky (Joseph Moulds) friend the meat, I made them some tea they ate the meat all the bread this was in the house   and obliged Evans to sift some Meal and make some more bread, when he had done so they again ate and drank and Ashton produced three or four bottles of Rum, some of which was drunk amongst us; they forced me to drjnk and said they would throw it over me if I did not especially  one of  them /William Baker/   they said they wanted to cross the river and asked me if I could shew them a  shallow places he did not say where they had

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come from they enquired if any soldiers or Constables had been seen about there I said to Ashton Mrs Youl was robbed on Sunday night was you there one of them I do not know which turned around and said ‘yes’. Ashton made no answer, I said to Ashton=, there is a Blacksmith in Gaol charged with robbing Major McLeod, Ashton replied than mad is an innocent as a child, just come from its mother’s womb, Ashton said have you heard of Mr Fawkners fay/lay I said no, he replied we gave him some property worth two hundred  pounds for which we were to receive fifty  but the Soldiers and Constables were planted  at the place where we were to get the money and we got wind of it  he then said to me we have got some capital watches here for sale, I said have you, what do you ask a piece for them, he opened a knapsack and then pulled out seven or eight watches, I looked at this one, he said chesworth,, five and twenty shillings is it not, I said it may be worth that but I have  only ten shillings in the House, he said well you

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and I have been old acquaintances and you shall have  it, I have him a half crown a six pence and seven shillings in silver and took the watch. I thought as he wanted money he would take it if I did not receive the watch, he said I will tell you whom it came from I said who, he said it came from Mrs Youl I said you were to blame to go to a poor widow  woman who has so many children he replied never mind any port in a storm, I have marked the watch and delivered it to Mr Mulgrave the Police Magistrate, It was now day light Ashton called me on one side and said they were going into the interior part of the Country and asked me if I could get them some flour I said perhaps I can but I have very little in the House I must go to the Captain for it, he said if we let you go up I hope you will not deceive them, I said I would not  they let me go, my wife, Thomas Evans and two young children were the only persons  I left in the house with the Bushrangers I

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went to captain Barclay’s House told him what had passed, and he immediately sent a man to Mr Gray’s, Mr David Gray Mr James Gray Mr William Gray and Mr James Aitken came soon afterwards to Captain Barclay’s House and proceeded to my Hut I soon after heard some firing and ran to my Hut and saw Robert Percival push open my Hut Door with the but end of his piece and a man called York went iinto the hut followed by Mr David Gray and I immediately saw Ashton in custody whom I took with Mr Gray to Captain Barclay’s. The Bushrangers brought two Bundles with them tied up in handkerchiefs and a yellow and a white kangaroo dog, I had not knapsacks in the house when the Bushrangers came there, they did no say what they would give me for my flour, they said they would give me something worth it. I am certain I had not seen  either of those four men for nine months before last Thursday, I did not know either Ashton, Baker or Gibson when they first came to my house on Thursday night – I knew Moulds, neither of them was ever at my House before question??? by Moulds did

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you not go out and get half a gallon of. I did not they would not let either of us leave the hut before day light, I saw a large red silk shawl in my House but I djd not receive it. I do not know what became of it, I did not say I got the rum from a man about a quarter of a mile from my house.

John Dunnon

sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton William Baker and Joseph Moulds

PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of John Dunnon who saith on the night of the 10th of July there were no arms of any description in my House until William Asshton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds came there not any knapsacks or Bundles this Gun was brought by one of them I brough tit to Launceston on Friday the 11th instant and delivered it to the Police Magistrate on the 12th instant

John Dunnon

Sworn before me at Launceston the 30th day of July 1827

PA Mulgrave

£200 for self

£ 200 for wife

PAM 20 July

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The information on oath of Thomas Evans free by servitude who deposeth and saith I reside at the Hut of John Dunnon on the South Esk River some time about the middle of the night one Thursday last the twenty of July I was in bed in the Hut Dunnon and his wife were in bed in another Room when Dunnon called to me and told me to look out at the window and see who was there I looked out at a window close to my bed and I saw two men near it one of them said open the Door I did so and four men came into eh Hut they had each a Gun in their hands one of which was a double barrelled Gun three of them had each a knapsack upon their backs I made a light with the fire and lighted a lamp one of them asked me is I was the master of the House I said no another rof them was going into Dunnon’s bed room, I said there is a woman there they called out to the person in the Bed Room “Get up, come out” John Dunnon got up and came to the outer room when one of

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the men called Ashton said is that you Dunnon, Dunnon said I do not know you and then said to another of the men is that you crankey they made me make a fire and boil them some tea they ate and drank and consumed all the bread there was in the House they made me make some dough  and one of them baked some more Bread and boiled some more tea Ashton opened a bundle they had brought with them and took some Bottles of rum from one of the knapsacks I think two they all drank some Rum but Mrs Dunnon and I, Ashton produced a watch a small one they said it was gold it had a gold or gilt chain to it, Ashton said he thought it was worth seventy guines, they made me go out of the hut and chop some wood one of the men named Baker stood over me with a Gun, I was employed getting wood and water and sifting flour more than an hour, I did not see Dunnon buy a watch, the first thing they did at day light was to tie my hands and forced me into an inner room and about an hour after I came out into the outer room and perceived Dunnon was gone, about ten

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minutes afterwards John Ashley Connor Rourke’s Government man came to the hut and asked Mrs Dunnon to lend his master the big iron pot the Bushrangers would not let him go away about half an hour afterwards the Dogs barked, two of the Bushrangers ran out and fired and immediately returned looked through the cracks in the weather boarding of the Hut and said there is my party running over the fence  round the river and said to me and Rourke’s man if any of you offer to move I will blow your brains out the hut Door was shut and I heard some body outside say Davey Gray there is one in now and a voice said I know there is soon after John Hargraves commonly called York pushed open the Door and Robert Percival Mr Frazer’s man sho was with York presented his Gun at Rourke’s man they both came into the Hut, Ashton ran into Dunnon’s bed Room got under the

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bed and pulled the clothes down to hide him as soon as he saw the Door was pushed open, Mr David Gray, Mr William Gray, and Mr Aitken and a man name Barker and another named Thomas Cutter soon after came into the Hut Frazer and man laid down upon the floor pointed a Gun at Ashton and said if you offer to move I will blow your brains out and then said some out Ashton come out Mr David Gray and some of the other persons caught hold of him and were searching of him when Mr Frazer came into the Hut I did not see what was taken from Ashton. The Bushrangers had two dogs with them neither their clothes nor Dogs were wet.

signed Thomas X Evans

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828

Sigd PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of Thomas Evans who being again sworn saith I cannot swear that William Ashton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds were the four armed men that came to the House of John Dunnon on the night of last Thursday I think

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they brought only three knapsacks and two Bundles with them they brought some fire arms with them I do not know ho many, I am sure there was no fire arms nor any knapsacks in the House when they came. Thomas Cutter took away one of those Knapsacks and Thomas Barker the other two, I do not believe there was any thing put into either of the knapsacks in Dunnon’s House except by the Bushrangers – I am certain William Ashton was on of the four men

Thomas X Evans

his mark

£200 PAM

Sworn before me at Launceston the seventeenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing on William Ashton  William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p147

The information on oath of John Ashton an assigned servant to Connor Rourke who deposeth and saith I recollect the morning when William Ashton was apprehended in the House of John Dunnon. I went there about eight o clock for an iron pot   my master sent me, the Door of Dunnon’s House was not fastened, I shoved it open and saw Joseph Moulds and William Baker standing in the House Baker had a Gun in his hand I  asked Mrs Dunnon to be so good as to lend my master an iron post she said yes take it, I saw an ironic post which had been frequently lent to my Master, I took it up and was going away with it when Moulds who had then a Gun in his hand said come back from to the fire, I put the post down and went to the fire Moulds told me to pur my Hands behind me, I did so and he tied them together with a silk Handkerchief, Ashton was sitting on   a stool by the fire asleep, I saw another man laying upon a bed with a Gun by his side, I did not see his face at all Thomas Evans was looking through a crack in the boards of the House and said some body is coming Moulds and Baker opened the Door looked out and  awoke Ashton and the man who laid upon the bed and said come on and all four ran out of the Room, I heard some Guns fired I do not know how many Ashton then returned

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into the house with a double barrelled Gun in his hand he took two Bundles which were tied up in silk Handkerchiefs off a Table and put them at the foot on Thomas Evans bed, I afterwards saw Mr Fenning’s take those Bundles away, two knapsacks were taken away at the same time and I saw a third knapsack afterwards delivered by Thomas Evans to Thomas Cutler after Ashton had taken the Bundles off the Table He went into an inner Room with the Double barrelled Fun in his hand, I am certain that nothing was taken out or put into either of the knapsacks or Bundles after the four armed men ran out of Dunnon’s House until they were delivered to Mr Fennings and Thomas Cutter except something which looked like a white Handkerchief which was put upon one of the knapsacks by Thomas Evans

sigd John X Ashley

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 30th day of July 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton William Baker John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p149

The information on oath of Mr David Gray of Trafalgar who deposeth and saith about seven o clock yesterday morning the eleventh of July I received information which induced me to go to the House of Captain Barclay on the South Esk River where I saw John Dunon who informed me that four Bushrangers had kept him Prisoner in the Hut all night and that they had allowed him to come out for the purpose of getting flour my Brothers James and William Nairn Gray and Mr James Aitken with Thomas Barker and John Hargrave assigned servants to Captain Barclay proceeded to the Hut and as we approached it some dogs gave an alarm and three men rushed out at the door armed with muskets one of whom fired at me Brother James who returned the fire and the three Bushrangers ran away and were pursued by my two Brothers and some other persons, I went to the Hut with Robert Percival an assigned servant to William Frazer and John Hargraves as assigned servant to Captain Barclay Dunnon’s wife was sitting on the Bed Thomas Evans and

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John Ashley a servant of a shoemaker named Connor were standing near the fire Robert Percival perceived a man under the bed who he pulled out it was William Ashton I laid hold of him and Mr Aitken  and William Frazer who came into the hut at the time took the silver watch marked W M on the side case with a gold seal with a red cornelian engraved R Cy with a metal key, this metal watch without a Glass the case of which is broken and this gold watch chain and two gold or gilt keys and one gold seal from the person of William Ashton and delivered them to me, also this canvas bag containing one silver shilling, two silver sixpences, this piece of a percussion lock and upwards of fifty metal caps for a percussion lock which I brought to Launceston and delivered to Mr Mulgrave the Police Magistrate last night who sealed them up in my presence and I saw his open that seal this morning they are in the same state as when they were taken from Ashton’s person by Mr Aitken or Mr Frazer I desired Thomas Barker to search the Hut and delivered a double Barrelled Gun

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with percussion locks to Mr Aitken which I found there and took Ashton to Captain Barclays where Thomas Barker came soon afterwards with the following articles viz the striped cotton half handkerchief this small fowling piece one bundle tied up in a cotton handkerchief a Bundle tied up in a silk handkerchief and three knapsacks and three pistols all loaded one with powder and cut lead the other two with powder and pistol bullets all of which I took to Launceston and delivered to the Police Magistrate last night in the same state in which I received them from Barker, I did not examine the Bundles or knapsacks when I delivered them these are the Bundles and knapsacks and appear to be in the same state as when I received them, the Bundle in the  cotton handkerchief contains two green shawls one white shawl one piece of striped red and yellow gauge one piece of striped blue and white striped silk gauge and two white silk Hat bands the silk Handkerchief contains a piece of buff china silk crape one white shawl one drab shawl one purple velvet pelisse and a loose collar one piece

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of blue woollen cloth and one piece of dark blue woollen cloth, one of the knapsacks contains a dark coloured cloth  jacket lined with white surge in one of the pockets a small looking glass one white cotton handkerchief spotted with red six silver table spoons unmarked one silver cream ewer, six silver table spoons marked RC twelve silver tea spoons eleven of them marker RC one unmakers six small silver tea spoons marked AC two pair of silver sugar tongs one plain the other marked RC four silver salt spoons three plain one marked Y/jj a piece of engraved silver a silver tobacco Box engraved NJ Domnum Amici, two plated egg cups, one silver top to a pepper castor and one silver tea spoon, one white and one black handled Razor, one other Razor in a black leather case, one paper ink case, a small quantity of Tobacco, one pair of cotton stockings one back silk handkerchief fie pair of fustian trowsers, new, one new fustian jackets one pair of nankeen trowsers, one linen shirt, one prayer Book, one map of Van Diemen’s Land, one package of gunpowder, one bullet mould

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and one penknife with a ivory Handle, knapsack number 2 contained one green frock coat one pair of nankeen trowsers, one bug waistcoat, one cotton shirt marked JY no18 one striped waistcoat one silver handled knife and fork one coloured cotton Handkerchief one white and one coloured Bag, one tin case containing small shot, one tin canister of Gunpowder one quart tin pot one yellow silk handkerchief containing pepper knapsack No 3 contained one cotton shirt marked J Youl one cotton shirt marked Magnus McLeod, tow other cotton shirts, one linen table cloth marked I.E.G. one pair of blue cloth trowsers one blue cloth waistcoat, one chart of Van Diemen’s Land in a case, one piece of linen cloth marked N containing short one small bag containing some small shot and powder one kangaroo skin pouch and one powder horn Barker also delivered to me this drab woollen jacket I have marked all these articles and delivered them to Mr Mulgrave

Sigd David H Gray

Sworn

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before me at Launcceston on the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Aston, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd  PA Mulgrave

The further information on oath of Mr David Gray who saith this is the double barrelled Gun with the percussion locks which I saw in the Hut of John Dunnon yesterday morning, and delivered to Mr James Aitken, I received it this morning from Doctor Alexander McNab; I am sure it is the same Gun the top is broken off one of the Cocks, I cannot be mistaken in the Gun I have put a mark upon it and delivered ti to the Police Magistrate.

David W Gray

Sworn before me at Launceston the 12th day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

Sigd PA Mulgrave

p155

The further information on oath of Mr David Gray who deposeth and Saith I received this shot Belt from my Brother William Nairn Gray this morning I have marked it and Delivered it to the Police Magistrate.

Sigd David W Gray

Sworn before me at Launceston the 15th day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p156

The information o oath of Mr William Frazer farmer of the South Esk river who deposeth and saith I was at the House of John Dunnon  yesterday morning the eleventh of July where I saw William Ashton in the custody of Mr David Gray, I searched Ashton and took from his person one silver watch with a seal and a key on a Ribbon a Handkerchief a gold watch and chain and another watch which appeared to be a metal one. I handed the fold watch to Mr David Gray and I think I gave the silver and the metal watch to Mr Aitken. I did not examined them, I believe this is the silver watch, I took it  out of the fob of Ashton’s trowsers, I verily believe this is the Gold watch, I am sure this is the gold chain, and this is the metal watch Ashton said nothing when I took the watches from him.

Sigd  Wm Frazer

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Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Mr Tristian Fenning who deposeth and saith on the morning of last Friday the eleventh of July, I went to the Hut of John Dunnon on the South Esk River, and saw Mr David Gray having hold of William Ashton, I received two Bundles tied up I believe in Handkerchiefs from Thomas Barker in Dunnon’s hut and carried them to Captain Barclay’s House and put them into a Room I have not seen them since, I think I should know one of the Bundles again I believe this is one of the Bundles, I am sure this piece of green and white silk, this piece of red and yellow  gauge and this white and green shawl were in one of those Bundles, it was tied up rather slack but nt quite so loose as it is now, I also received a pistol from Barker in the Hut and carried it to Captain Barclay’s House which si put into the Room with the Bundles. I should not know the pistol again if  I was to see it

Sigd  Tn Fenning

p159

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p160

The information on oath of Thomas Barker an assigned servant to Captain Barclay who deposeth and saith, I accompanied Mr David Gray from my master’s House to the Hut of John Dunnon on the South Esk River one Friday morning, the 11th of July the Dogs gave an alarm when we were about forty rods from the Hut and three men armed with muskets came out of the Hut two of them fired towards Mr James Gray and all three of them ran away a forth man came out of the Hut and immediately returned into it again, John Hargraves pulled William Ashton from under a Bed I took a double barrelled piece and a pistol from under the Bed where Ashton was laying the piece had fDifferent locks to what I had ever seen before and one of them was broken there was a little brass thing upoatta right hand cock, I am partly sure this is the piece, I am quite sure the piece I took from the Hut was the same I

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I delivered to Mr David Gray I saw two knapsacks and two Bundles tied up in Handkerchiefs in the Hut, Mr Fenning carried the two Bundles to Captain Barclays House and the pistol I carried one of the knapsacks and another man carried the other in my presence to Captain Barclays House I should now know the knapsacks or the pistol again if I was to see them I do not know what became of them I left them at the Door of Captain Barclays House in the presence of Mr David Gray, both the knapsacks were then in the same state as when they were taken form Dunnons Hut. I did not take so much notice of the Bindles as to be able to know them again I do not know that either of the men present were of those who fired near the Hut.

sigd Thomas Barker

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Lieutenant Fitzherbert Coddington who deposeth and saith I was in search of Bushrangers yesterday morning the 11th July accompanied by Lieutenant Serjeantson and a party of the 40th Regiment, the party started three men about a mile from the Cocked Hat Hill, I did not see one of them distinctly, Mr Serjeantson and I rode after two of them in advance of our party and when we got within about twenty yeardds of them they stopped turned round and threw down their arms, the party was about a hundred yards in the rear, I dismounted took up the muskets the men had thrown down and stood by them until the party came up, John Gibson and William Baker were the two men, I marked the muskets and delivered them to the Police Magistrate yesterday these are them I am not certain by which of the men the musket with the sling was thrown down. I think it was by Gibson they were both loaded

sigd  Fitzberbert Coddington

Lt 40th Regt

p163

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of John Hargraves as assigned servant to Captain Barclay who deposeth and saith I heard a firing near the Hut of John Dunnon on the South Esk River on Friday morning the 111th of July, Mr Fenning came to me whilst I was at Plough and asked me to accompany him to the Hut as I passed the Hut I saw through a crevice into the boards two men with the hands tied I called out to Mrs Dunnon “Eliza is any one in” she replied some in and see, I pushed the Door open with my Hands and was followed by Robert  Percival who was armed with a fowling piece, I saw William Ashton under a Bed in Mrs Dunnons bed Room, and I saw a shot belt round his neck by which I pulled him out I delivered that shot belt to Mr William Gray about a minute afterwards it had two brasses on the top of which the shot comes out, I think one of the tops was lost out this is the Belt I accompanied Mr David Gray when he took William Ashton  to Captain Barclays

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House soon after he was apprehended.

John X Hargraves

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Robert Percival an assigned servant to Mr William Frazer who deposeth and saith Last Friday morning the 11th of Jjuly one of Captain Barclay’s servants told my master that there was some Bushrangers at John Dunnon’s Hut my master gave me a piece that was loaded and ordered me to go there, on my arrival I saw Mr David Gray and several other persons outside the Hut; one of Captain Barclay’s men I believe John Hargrave pushed open the door, I pointed my piece into the hut and said si any one here, they said come and see, I went into t an inner Room and saw Mrs Dunnon sitting on a Bed the clothes of which reached to the floor I pulled the bed clothes on one side and saw William Ashton under the Ned he was coming from under it when Captain Barclays man (Hargrave) laid hold of a shot belt which Ashton had upon his person and pulled it off him, I then left the House and went in search of some other Bushrangers that I understood were over the Hill. My master’s house is a quarter of a mile from Dunnon’s Hut.

Robert X Percival

his mark

p167

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Joseph Gray of Launceston a constable belonging to the band of field Police who deposeth and saith I was with a party of military on last Friday morning when William Baker and John Gibson were apprehended I saw a soldier take this shot belt, this powder horn, this opera glass, and this gold ring with a ruby set in it, from the person of John Gibson the Soldier immediately delivered the shot Belt and Powder Horn to me immediately after he had taken them from Gibson and the opera glass and ring at the Police Office in Launceston. I marked them and delivered them to the Police Magistrate that night. I took this cotton shirt marked JY 14 this knife and this pair of white cotton stockings from the person of William Baker in the Police Office the same day and marked them and delivered them to the Police Magistrate.

sigd Joseph Gray

p169

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

p170

The information on oath of Charles Smith of Launceston Constable who deposeth I took this shirt marked J Youl 2, this gilt watch and this striped half cotton handkerchief from the person of John Gibson in the Police Office on the afternoon of last Friday I marked those things at the time and delivered them to the Police Magistrate at the same time and place I took this copper ring from the finger of William Baker, these two piece of gilt chain and this gilt watch ring out of this pocket.

I also took this tortoiseshell comb from Joseph Moulds on this 12th instant out of his waistcoat pocket I marked all these things and delivered them to the Police Magistrates

Charles X Smith

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the seventeenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Thomas Cutter a prisoner holding a Ticket of Leave who deposeth and saith I recollect the morning when William Ashton was apprehended in the House of John Dunnon. I saw him pulled from under a Bed by Robert Percival and John Hargrave who took a shot belt off Ashton’s shoulder and I took a powder flask from his neck, I left the House for a short time and in passing it Thomas Evans said will you take this knapsack to Captain Barclay’s he had then a knapsack in his hand which he delivered to me it was open and as I lifted it up two pistols dropped out of it I do not know what else it contained I carried it to captain Barclays and delivered it to Mr David Gray by whose orders I put it by the side of two or three other knapsacks in Captain Barclays yard, I do not know what became of them afterwards the knapsacks was in the same state when I delivered it to Mr Gray when I received it from Thomas Evans

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I did  not examine it on the road from Dunnon’s House to Captain Barclays.

Thomas X Cutler

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the thirteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Charles Smith of Launceston a constable who deposeth and saith I was in company with Mr Henry Hinksman a Police Officer all last night watching the House of a man named Joseph Smith at Paterson’s Plains into which a man entered between nine and tent o clock we did not go close to the House for fear of alarming the Dogs but remained within sight of the door until day break this morning only that person went in during the whole night and no person came out. I went to the door with Mr Hinksman about seven o clock this morning it was ajar we went into the House I said who is there who have we got here Joseph Smith said non but what ought to be here I said how man are there he said two a woman named May was in bed on the opposite side of the Room from that where Smith lay some person in the Bed with Joseph Smith called out is that you Smith or Charles Smith I said yes get up and shew yourself. I immediately heard something fall which

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made a noise like the falling of a musket a bag was hung before the window which was removed and Mr Hiinksman then said is it you Moulds and the person who was in bed with Joseph Smith said yes Mr Hinksman. I saw this musket under the bedshead picked it up and asked Moulds if it was his he said yes I said is it loaded he said yes there is a rum charge in it five three quarter balls I fired off the musket, Moulds then delivered me this small bag containing some three quarter Balls and some Buck shot, Joseph Moulds and Joseph Smith were both undressed, I found this tortoiseshell comb in Mould’s waistcoat pocket, I have marked it and delivered it to the Police Magistrate.

Charles X Smith

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of   Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The further information on oath of Charles Smith who saith there was a good deal of laughing and loud talking in the House of Joseph Smith soon after Joseph Moulds entered it I heard it at the distance of thirty yards.

Charles X Smith

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twenty fourth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of   Joseph Smith

sigd PA Mulgrave

The further information of Charles Smith who deposeth and saith I searched the person of John Gibson yesterday in the Police Office and took from it this metal watch this striped cotton half handkerchief and this cotton shirt marked J Youl 2,  I marked them and delivered them to the Police Magistrate immediately afterwards.

Charles X Smith

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of   John Gibson

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Mr Henry Hinksman Police Officer who deposeth and saith about nine o clock last night Friday the 11th of July I was in company with Constable Charles Smith directed by the Police Magistrate to search for Joseph Moulds in the Forest between Paterson’s Plains and the Cocked Hat Hill, I saw a person stealing along with a Gun in his hand I watched and followed him to the House of a man named Joseph Smith and remained watching the House with Charles Smith until day light this morning when the Door was opened and I went in with Constable Smith and saw Joseph Moulds undressed and in bed with Joseph Smith who was also undressed, there was a woman in bed on the left hand side of the Door when I went in I said who is here, Joseph Smith replied there are tow here it is all right, I said shew yourselves Moulds immediately said is that you Charles I turned a bag which hung before the window on one side and there had a plain

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view of Moulds and said is that you Moulds he said yes it is Mr Hinksman I said have you any firearms he said yes I have a Gun if is under the Bed Moulds got out of Bed and delivered a Gun to Constable Smith and gave me this powder flask, I asked him if he had any pistols he said no there is the flask there is the Gun and here are the Balls and delivered a Bag of Balls to Constable Smith, This is the Gun he delivered it to Constable Smith I have now delivered it with thee powder flask to the Police Magistrate also these twelve pieces of silver coin which I have marked I took them from out of the waistcoat pocket of Joseph Moulds after he dressed himself this morning – I carefully searched the House of Joseph Smith he said that Joseph Moulds had delivered himself up for him and that he meant to bring him to Launceston this morning – I have taken from the person of Joseph Moulds one cotton shirt marked JYoul 15, one striped cotton waistcoat one pair of fustian trowsers.

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one fustian jacket and one pair of white nankeen trowsers. I have marked them and delivered them to the Police Magistrate.

sigd  A Hinksman

Sworn before me at Launceston the twelfth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of   Joseph Moulds

sigd PA Mulgrave

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The information on oath of Joshua Sharp who deposeth and saith I am a prisoner in the service of Mr Joceyln Thomas and reside on his farm at the Snake Bank about two o clock on a Monday morning five weeks ago three men came to my Hut where I was alone one of them was a tall man the other two were short men I do not know how the tall man was dressed one of the short men wore a duck frock a pair of fustian trowsers a yellow handkerchief round his neck and a black handkerchief over his face the other man wore a blue jacket a pair of corduroy trowsers and a coloured handkerchief over his face the man with the duck frock had a brass double barrelled blunderbuss when he came into the Hut he desired me to stand he presented the Blunderbuss at me the man with the blue jacket

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went into the loft of the hut and brought down three blankets a blue jacket and two large white coats the coats belonged to my master they were exactly of the same colour and description as these now shewn me but larger. I am not certain that these are the coats that were then stolen the blankets and jacket belonged to Robert Coldwell the men remained at the Hut about ten minutes I do not know that either William Ashton or Joseph Moulds were of the men who came to my Hut on that  day I do not believe that I ever saw William Ashton William Baker John Gibson or Joseph Moulds before this day

Joshua X Sharp

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the eighteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and  Joseph Moulds

PA Mulgrave

p181

The information on oath of Robert Coldwell of the Snake bank holding a Ticket of Leave who deposeth and saith on a Monday a month or six weeks ago I lived in a Hut at the Snake Banks in the service of Mr Jocelyn Thomas. John Sharp was my fellow servant. I left home soon after sun rise that morning leaving Sharp in the Hut and these two great coats upon my own bed in the loft. [short hand here in pencil in margin – military?] they are light coloured woollen coast I know this Coat by the hole under the Cape and by being split in the collar I know this other coat by these seams which I sewed myself with black thread they are the property of Mr Jocelyn  Thomas he sent them to the Hut for the use of the Shepherds. I returned to the hut about two or three o clock the things were scattered about in it and Sharp told

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me that three armed men had robbed the Hut and taken away these two coats and several other articles.

Rochard X Coldwell

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the twenty fourth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and  Joseph Moulds

PA Mulgrave

p183

The information on oath of Thomas McHenry as assigned servant to Mr Allen Mc Donald  who deposeth and saith on last Friday morning my master Mr Allen Mc Donald ordered me to accompany him in pursuit of some Bushrangers and I saw William Baker and John Gibson taken by two officers between Samuel Porter’s farm and the new Road this drab cloth jacket was laying near the New River and I picked it up in the pursuit some time after one of the Soldiers fired and I soon after picked up a Hat when I came up to Gibson after he was taken he said to me you may as well let me put that Hat on, I gave it to him and he said you may as well let me put on that coat too and I was handing it to him when

p184

one of the officers prevented me from giving it to him – I found this fur cap inside one of the pockets of the jacket they have not been out of my possession since and are in the same state as when I picked them up I have marked them and delivered them to the Police magistrate.

15th/4 (in pencil)

Thos Mc Henry (signed)

Sworn before me at Launceston the fifteenth day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing William Ashton, William Baker, John Gibson and  Joseph Moulds

PA Mulgrave

(Margin)

Rex vs Ashton and others

15th July 1828

DECIDED

(pencil Mr J Thomas’s coat)

p185 (July 1828 in pencil)  CATHERINE MC LEOD IN 1841 [ii]

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

The information on oath of Mrs Catherine McLeod wife of Donald McLeod Esquire of Emu Plains who deposeth and saith some armed men attacked our house a little before nine o clock on the evening of Monday the twenty third of June and stole therefrom a gold watch the property of  my husband one man remained at the Gate about twelve yards from the House I saw  him once or twice he was once coming towards the House when one of this companions cried out Jack you are not wanted here there is enough without you look out at the back the man I saw near the Gate was about the height and figure of George Archer he wore a shooting jacket of the same appearance as that now worn by George Archer he had a long piece over his shoulder he had a handkerchief tied over his face I could not discern

p186

his features, I am not at all certain that Archer was that man.

Sworn before me at Launceston the first of July 1828

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p187

The examination of George Archer free by servitude who saith on Monday the twenty third of June I was on the premises of Mr Andrew Barclay the whole of the day I was working for him and slept on his premises that nitgh with William Patten a free man slept  in the adjoining room I slept in the kitchen and went to bed about nine o clock in the evening, I remained at Captain Barclay’s from that night until last Saturday, I saw Henry Speakman at the House of George Radford at Perth on Sunday the twenty second of June, I went there to get some clean linen, I did not drink with Speakman at Radford’s House.

G. Archer (Signed)

Taken before me at Launceston this first day of July 1828

PA Mulgrave

p188

The information of Winifred Mc Nally who deposeth and saith I life at the House of Michael Doogan I know George Archer I never saw Jane Brown in the Company of George Archer I do not know that I ever saw a woman named Brown at Doogan’s house I saw a woman there but I do not know her name I recollect a constable coming to Doogan’s House I think on last Friday night he searched the House there was a Box in the House and the Constable asked me to whom It belonged. I said one of the men he broke it open I do not know to whom it belonged I never saw that Box open before I do not know what the Constable took away. Michael Doogan told the Constable he brought the box to his house.

Winifred X McNally

her mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave

p189

The information on oath of Michael Doogan free by Servitude farmer at the Springs who deposeth and saith I know George Archer he delivered me a Box at the Punt about two months ago it was locked I took it to my House and it remained there until alst Friday. I never saw it opened during theta time he delivered me the box at the House of a man named Radford and asked me to take care of ti for him he did not say what it contained George Archer was at my House twice or thrice between the time he delivered me the Box and last Friday he did not say a word about the Box either time, I knew a woman named Mary Brown a assigned servant to major McLeod she was at My House on a Sunday about four months ago with John Kenny who came with her to the House George Archer

p190

was there she stopped there about two hours she left my House about an hour before sundown with Kenny and Archer she was at my House about a fortnight before that tine Archer was in the House when she came there she went away Archer remained at my House all night Archer never told me that any part of the property which was in the Box he delivered to me belonged to Mary Brown.

Mr Hinksman came to my house one night last week I do not know what night and broke open that Box I never saw it open before he took  away a quantity of women’s clothes out of the box I did not tell him who the clothes belonged to I did not know I did not take any account of the things Mr Hinksman took away I told him it would be necessary to make a memorandum of what he took away and he said it will be allright what I take away

Michl Dugan (signed)

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of July 1828

PA Mulgrave

p191

The information on oath of Thomas barker an assigned servant to Captain Barclay who deposeth and saith. I saw George Archer in my master’s kitchen on the evening of last Monday week about half past eight o clock with William Patten. I was the first man who ran my master’s premises the next morning and went into the kitchen and saw George Archer in his bed there I did not observe the state of his shoes Archer had been living at my master’s House about a fortnight and slept there all the time there are a number of dogs upon the premises who bark if nay man or thing stirs in the night. I am not certain whether I heard the Dogs bark on that night I never heard that any of the Dogs barked during that night.

Thomas Barker (signed)

p192

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave

p193

The information of William Patten who deposeth and saith I was at the House of Mr Andrew Barclay on last Monday week I went to bed a little  after eight o clock on that night in a Room separated from Captain Barclay’s kitchen by a passage I left Archer in the kitchen he was making his bed, I saw him the next morning, at day light he wore the same dress that he now wears. I never saw him have a fowling piece or Gun in his possession I did not observe that state of his shoes that morning, I am a carpenter and was building upon Captain Barclays premises Archer was employed shingling, I saw no watch or clock that night I believe it was after eight of clock that night when I left the kitchen.

William Patten (signed)

(pencil 3d July Speakman and Archer)

p194

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p195

The information on oath of John Davis as assigned servant to Mr Andrew Barclay sworn saith about nin o clock on the evening of Monday the 23rd June I saw George Archer in my Master’s kitchen with William Patten I believe he slept there that night I slept in the store about a hundred yards from the kitchen Door I saw nothing of Archer from the time I left him until about five o clock the next morning when I saw him sitting on his bed dressing himself he wore a shooting jacket on the Monday, I never saw a fowling piece in Archer’s possession, I saw his shoes by his bed side in the kitchen on Tuesday morning they were not very dirty it is about a mile and a half from my master’s house to

p196

Major McLeod’s house, the road between the house was very dirty on that morning

John X Davis

his mark

(pencil 3d July Speakman and Archer)

Sworn before me at Launceston the third day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p197

Van Diemen’s Land

To Wit

The information on oath of Mrs Catherine McLeod wife of Donald McLeod Esquire who deposeth and saith Mary Brown the assigned servant of my Husband absconded from his service the early part of last March and has not since been heard of the blue cloth pelisse and the muslin gown produced by Mrs Hinksman were her property I cannot identify any of the other articles produced by Mrs Hinksman as the property of the my Husband Donald McLeod Esquire Mary Brown had that Pellisse and Gown in her possession a short time before she left my House.

George Archer was frequently at my Husband’s house whilst Mary Brown lived there and

p198

they were upon terms of the greatest intimacy

Cathn McLeod (signed)

Sworn before me at Launceston the eleventh day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p199

The information on oath of Mr Henry Hinksman Police Officer who deposeth and saith on the evening of the 28th of last June I found the blue cloth Pellisse and the muslin Gown identified by Mrs Catherine Mc Leod as the property of Mary Brown locked up in a Box in the House3 of Michael Dugan at the Springs, this Bible was also in the Box which I had seen given to Mary Brown on board the ship Persian on her passage from England. This patch work quilt I also know is her property, the other articles contained in the list on the reverse were also in the Box and George Archer now under examination voluntarily states they are all the property of Mary Brown except one shirt one Bible four pairs of cotton stockings and two cotton half handkerchiefs

HH Hinksman (signed

Sworn before me at Launceston the eleventh day of July 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of George Archer

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p200

one blue cloth pelisse

one pair of stays

four pair of white cotton stockings x

two bibles one x

1 religious tract

four petticoats

three shifts

one shirt x

one pair of white drill trowsers xx

three cotton night gowns

two half white handkerchiefs marked G.A. no3 4 x

two check apron /2/

2 coloured gowns

two half silk handkerchief

one do do

nine night caps

one pocket

one towel

on pair of kid Gloves

one do leath gloves

one Bag of sundiredd

one bed quilt

HH Hinksman

(Bushrangers in pencil)

George Archer

July 28

Decided

SEALING

p201 (Brady August 1828 in pencil)

The examination of George Thomas who saith I arrived in this colony free with Captain Langdon in the ship Lusitania about five year and a half ago I was employed on the River Derwent about three years in Boats about three years ago  I shipped on board the Schooner Governor Brisbane belonging to mr Kemp Captain Davidson was master of that vessel I think his name was David Davidson we left the Derwent upon a sealing voyage we went to the coast of New Holland and about four months after we had left Hobart Town I was landed with five of the crew and one sealing Boat on South East Island with three months provisions for the purpose of procuring seal skins, I had not the least idea but what the vessel would return to the Island at the end of the three months but I have never seen the vessel since she had

p202

eleven men on board including the Captain when I left her, I remained upon the island and neighbouring coast about eleven months until the Amity a Government Big came to King George’s Sound to form a settlement, a Lieutenant belonging to the Fly sloop of war and Major Lockyer were on Board the Amity those Gentlemen employed me to act as Pilot at King George’s Sound and I remained in that capacity about eight months when I left of my own accord and went to Sydney in the Amity the second time she came there; I do not know what became of the boat belonging to Mr Kemp the men I was left with continued on or about the Island with the Boat, we collected about two hundred skins which were shared out between us, I received payment for my services as pilot at the Secretarys Office in Sydney, I remained in Sydney eight or nine months when I shipped on board the Dragon Brig Captain

p203

Forbes and went to Hobart Town, got my discharge and engaged with a man named Curry who built the Sloop Margaret to go to Penguin Island which had been cast away there we went there in a whale boat Mr Curry four men and I were all that left Hobart Town in the Boat after we had been there four or five days  our provisions were out and I thought proper to leave Mr Curry and came away in a bot called the Fly at Preservation island where Mr Curry had taken his men to, Mr Curry left Preservation to go to Launceston in Captain Innnis’s sloop and four or five days after he was gone I went on board a boat called the Fly under the charge of Henry Rogers to whom the boat belonged there were seventy or eighty kangaroo skins as three or four fowling pieces belonging to Rogers in the Boat, there were three

p204

men besides Rogers and I in the Boat I met Mr Curry at George Town he asked me why I had left I said because I had not provisions the rest of Mr Curry’s men remained on Preservation Island I arrived at Launceston on Saturday night last about ten o ‘ clock I was not bound to serve Mr Curry for any stated time there was no written agreement between us when I told him I had left because I had no provisions he said he could not help it, Rogers brought nothing to Preservation Island in his Boat but the skins and fowling pieces when I left Mr Kemp’s Boat I received about thirty skins for my share, I called upon Mr Barker Mr Kemp’s partner when I was in Hobart Town and rold him where I had been left he did not take or order me to go to the police office – Samuel Lear/Sear, Henry Rogers, Henry Stevens, and John (Blank) were in the Boat Fly when I joined her at Preservation Island, I had not previous knowledge of

p205

those men I ever saw any Licence belonging to the Boat Fly, Lear left the Boat this morning for the purpose of going to Hobart Town to get some £ money from his  Brother who is a baker there to fit out a Boat until the season for sealing began we meant to wait for him in the Tamar eight days about East Arm to catch some kangaroo it is cheaper living there than in Launceston, we sold the kangaroo skins we brought here to Mr Thomas Williams none of us have been to the Naval Office since we  arrived nor to any other places since our arrival to report ourselves

George X Thomas

his mark

Sworn before me at Launceston the 12th  day of August 1828

PA Mulgrave (signed)

p206

The examination of Henry Stevens who saith I arrived in this colony from the Isle of France in the schooner Flamingo about nine or ten months ago I have a sister in Hobart Town married to a man named Clark who keeps a Grocers shop there I was discharged from the Flamingo and remained in Hobart Town until last April when I engaged with Joseph Castle to go to Basses Strait in a Boat to procure seal skins a Boy named John Castle  and Joseph Pike left Hobart Town as passengers in the Boat  which they left with Joseph Castle at his farm at Little Swan Port at Oyster Bay Castle the owner of the Boar gave Henry Rogers charge of her we proceeded to the Straits with Samuel Lear/Sear and James Davis who also belongs to the Boat after we had left Swan Port about two months we landed on a place called the

p207

tongue of land a Mr Curry landed there with a Boat and five men about a week after we got there Davis had been complaining of ill health ever since we left Hobart Town and he died the day after Mr Curry arrived Mr Curry ordered prayers to be read over the body which was buried there we went to the Eddistone and from thence to Preservation Island where we took on board George Thomas one of Mr Curry’s men and a man named John (blank) who was cast away in the Margaret sloop belonging to Mr Curry and arrived at Launceston very late on Saturday night last with about eighty kangaroo skins and three Guns we procured the skins upon the coast and the Guns we brought from Hobart Town, they belong to Castle the owner, we only got two seal skins one of which Mr Curry kept and the other was cured by our Boats Crew for Moccasins. Mr Curry was short of provisions and we supplied him with some of

p208

ours as far as it went and he said he would repay us when we got to Preservation where he had ordered provisions to be sent from Hobart Town but when we arrived at Preservation there had been only a cask of beef sent there for him and we were obliged to come to Launceston for flour which we expected to get by selling the kangaroo skins and with the money we expect Samuel Lear will bring from Hobart Town – I was never at Launceston before I do not know that Rogers or Lear were ever in this port in charge of a Boat before no persons asked us who we were when we arrived a man who I took to be a watchman at the wharf asked us where the boat had come from we told him from the Straits the Boat has remained at the wharf ever since we took the

p209

Guns out on Sunday morning and the skins yesterday I do not know if either Castle or Rogers has a licence for the Boat she is called The Fly this is the Boat clearance I saw castle deliver it to Rogers at Little Swan Port where Castle was obliged to leave the Boat to look after his farm and cattle he first proposed to go sealing in the Boat but altered  his mind when he got to his Farm – we had very bad weather between Swan Port and the tongue of land

Henry Stevens (signed)

p210

The examination of Henry Rogers who saith I arrived at Hobart Town about three years ago in the Medway I was a prisoner for Life and received a Free pardon in last April or May twelve months which I left with Edward Brown a Gardener and labourer in Hobart Town he is married and lives in Liverpool Street he is free by pardon also, we procured our pardons for our services in the Bush in pursuit of Matthew Brady and his party Bushrangers, I left Hobart Town in Last April and went to Little Swan Port where Joseph Castle the Owners gave me command of the Boat and delivered me this clearance we proceeded to Basses Straits sealing, we landed on our way as a place called the Tongue of Land where one of the Boats crew James Davis died, Mr Curry put in at the Tongue of Land with six men they were short of Provisions we lent them

p211

some of ours and he said he expected some provisions at Preservation Island we went there and found that there was no flour there we then proceeded to Launceston taking with us one of mr Curry’s men George Thomas to assist us to pull the Boat we arrived at Launceston on Saturday night last about nine o clock, we were strangers and did not report our arrival except to a constable one the wharf who we told we had come from Preservation Island as that the Boat was a sealing Boat we brought only about eighty kangaroo skins and three fowling pieces besides the Boats Gear and our own clothes one of our Men is gone to Hobart Town for money to  purchase flor & c to fit us our for the Straits for a sealing voyage

Constable Worrall headed the party that I went with after Brady we took Brown Mc Kendrick and Gregory about eighteen miles above Mr Humphrey’s upper Run on the Derwent

p212

Joseph Morgan, David Christmas, Larry Murray and Ayton and John Neale were with me besides Brown and Worrall but no soldiers at the time we took the Bushrangers

Henry X Rogers

his mark

Taken before me at Launceston the 12th of August 1828

p213

The examination of Joseph Robson who saith I am a seaman I arrived in this Colony free in the ship North Briton which I left at Hobart Town last new years day about a week afterwards I was employed in a Boat on the Derwent for William Ramsey of Hobart Town on the 9th of last March I engaged to go to Port Dalrymple in a sloop called the Margaret belonging to Mr Curry on our passage the sloop was cast away on Penguin Island about six weeks afterwards I went to Preservation Island where I have been employed by Munro who lives there (except about a week when I went to the Main in a Boat belonging to Richard Maynard) until I came away in a Boat called The Fly under the care of a man named Rogers about fifteen days ago I arrived at Launceston in the Boat last Saturday night we

p214

brought nothing from Preservation Island but our clothes some kangaroo skins and three fowling pieces which belonged to Rogers or his men where were four men in the Boat besides  me I do not know their names I was never in Launceston before it was about ten o clock when we arrived a constable on the wharf asked where the Boat had come from he was told she came from the Straits

John X Robson

his mark

Taken before me at Launceston this fourteenth of August 1828

A sealing boat and her crew

Aug 1828

p215

(slip of paper c 15 x 8 cm)

Septr 1828

Informations of

Robt Taylor

Benedict Von Bibra

Thomas Smith

Rex versus

William Baker

William Ashton

John Gibson

Joseph Moulds

p216 (sept 1828 in pencil)

The information on oath of Mr Robert Taylor of the Macquarie River settler who deposeth and saith on an evening about seven o clock, I think the eighth of last July on a Tuesday I heard a rap at my front door, Mrs Taylor opened the Door when three armed men entered the house, one of them presented his Gun at Mt wife and said stop the other two followed him, the first then presented his Gun at me and said two or three times is there any  body else in the House I said no what are you  he said Bushrangers my fowling piece was standing at one corner of the Room he took it up and said is it loaded I said no it is not he took the ramrod out of it and said this is just what I want here is a screw at the end of it, he put the ramrod into his own Gun and handed the Fowling piece to one of the other men who was nearest the Door, this is the ramrod I know it by the crack near the larger end it is mine and worth upwards of a shilling, the fowling piece was also mine worth five pounds, the man I first saw then said who is in the Hut I said I do not know two of the men then ran out of the House and I then saw a fourth man standing at the Door

p217

the two men returned in two or three minutes with my shepherd Thomas Smith and a knapsack, I said  I hope they would not use any body badly they said they would not and only take what they wanted the man who first came in took this powder flask my property worth ten shillings from a nail on which it was hanging, and put it round his neck I knew it by its general appearance and by this string off which the green woollen cord was worn, I had had it five years, he searched my boxes containing clothes and took from one of them a pound of Gunpowder worth two shillings,  the tallest man of the three said we will not hurt this man much I have heard a good name of him when the man who came in first turned from the Box and said to me if you will give me all the money you have we will not taken any thing else from you. I replied I believe I have only two pounds in the House and I opened a pocket Book which was in the  Box he had searched and gave him two one pound notes one of M Gellibrands Bank the others of the Cornwall Bank, he said you must have more I said I have not

p218

he then searched the Box and another and took a metal chain and a gold ring out of one of them and put into his pocket, my wife begged him to give her the ring, he did so and upon my telling hism the chain was only metal he threw it down, he asked me for some grog, I said I had none, he asked me what was in another Box I told him a little win he obliged me to take put a half gallon bottle from which all the four men drank several glasses they all then went our of the House I begged them to return me my Gun the tallest man said I might have it but the man who had it in his hand said it is a better one than mine and I shall keep it and took it away one of them said we must take  this man (Thomas Smith) with us I said I hope you will not keep him long they said we will not take him far and then left my premises after having been there about fifteen minutes they went from the back of the house towards the Bush  my House is near to Mr Von Bibras’s and Mrs Robert Corney’s next to hers, about ten minutes after they

p219

were gone I went to Mr Simpson’s Farm where I found James Rowland and another of my servants and sent Rowland to Mr Sutherland the magistrate to inform him that had passed at whose house a party of soldiers were stationed, I returned home and went to bed, Rowland returned about three o clock in the morning with two soldiers and a constable and ten or fifteen minutes afterwards Thomas Smith returned with my fowling piece be said the Bushrangers took him to Mrs Voc Bibra’s House from which they took a sword and a kangaroo dog, that they then ordered him to take them to Mr Corney’s House and when they got near it they tied his hands behind him to a rail and told him he must stope there until they came back to loosen him that they then went to Mr Corney’s House that he remained tied there three or four hours during which time one of the Bushrangers came to him two or three times that he begged very hard to have my piece returned to him and the last tine the Bushrangers came to him he untied his hands and gave him the piece and suffered him to return, all the things taken from my House by the Bushrangers except the knapsack were my property when they told me they were Bushrangers I considered my life was in danger

p220

or I should not have given up the money, I never saw either of these four men before that I know of William Ashton, John Gibson, and Joseph Moulds are three of the men who robbed my House as I have stated. Joseph Moulds is the man who took my Gun and took the Ramrod out of it, it was he to whom I gave the two one pound notes, I it was William Ashton who said he had heard a good account of me and would not hurt me, there was a lighted candle in the House whilst those three men were there their faced were uncovered and I saw them distinctly I do not know if William Baker was the man who stood at the Door or  not, each of the men had a Fun, Joseph Moulds had two pistols stuck in his belt I saw no more than those four strange men in ora bout my House that night

signed Robert Taylor

Sworn before me at Launceston  the 11th day of Sept 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Baker William Ashton John Gibson and Joseph  Moulds

sgd  PA Mulgrave

£100 in margin

p221

Copies of information

in the case of Rex

versus

William Ashton

William Baker

William Gibson

Joseph Moulds

p222

The information on oath of Thomas Smith an assigned servant  to Mr Robert Taylor of the Macquarie River who deposeth and saith on a Tuesday evening about the eighth of July last I was in my Hurt near my masters dwelling House when four armed me came there and searched the Hut and took away a knapsack and asked where the other men who lived with me were I told them that the two men who lived at the hut with me had gone with a message to Mr Simpsons they obliged me to go to my masters House with them which they searched and took away a fowling piece belonging to my master they then made me go with them to Mrs Von Bibras House – which they searched in like manner and took from it a sword aa shot belt and a kangaroo dog, they knocked at Mrs Von Bibras Door and as soon as it was opened two of them rushed in and presented their piece at Benedict Von Bibra and his Brother after they had remained there about a quarter of an hour they ordered me to go out with them and made me shew them the road to Mr Rt Corneys house they tied me to a fence within about fifty yards of the mens hut and a hundred or a hundred and twenty yards of

p223

the House, they tied my hands with a handkerchief behind me and then tied  them to a rail and tied Mr Von Bibras dog and another near me they told me to remain quiet and went to the Hut the dogs barked as they went up and I then heard a Rush, I soon after heard a knocking at Mr Corney’s House about half an hour after one of the armed men came to me, he looked at me but did not speak nor I to him he went away again to wards the House and returned to me in about three quarters of an house, I asked him to let me at liberty as I was very cold he said the house is like a Rabbit Warren to search and went away towards the House, he returned the third time in about an hour and took the knapsack which had been stolen from my Hut and which had been left near the Dogs he took it in a direction of the House and said he should not be long and then he would let me at liberty, he came to me in about an hour he had then two pieces in his hands  he untied me and gave me one of the piece told me to go home and give Mr Taylor the piece, I did so, it was Mr Taylors fowling piece, the man just loosened the

p224

handkerchief with which I was bound to the rail and went away I took the handkerchief and gave it to constable John White as soon as I got home, no one of the Bushrangers told me where they had been or what they had done before they came to my masters house I did not hear them speak on those matters to each other, I never saw either of them before, the man who untied my hand gave me nothings besides my masters fowling piece and that had not ramrod, I should know the ramrod that was already in my masters fowling piece by a flaw near the end of it, I believe this is that ramrod = I saw no other men near Mr Corney’s house on that night but these four men who said they had another party who had passed me before them, they took me away forcibly, I do not know I was in fear of my life but if I had refused to have gone, I feared they would have shot me, I did not go with them voluntarily, they told my master they must take me, I did not  hear them call each other by their names when they went into Ms Von Bibras House

p225

Mrs Von Bibra said to one of them for Gods sake that is not you Gibson is it, the man replied do not be alarmed we will not hurt you.

I am certain the four men who robbed my master were the same who made me taken them on that night to Mr Corney’s House.

I know that Joseph Moulds and John Gibson were two of the men who robbed my master’s House. I am not certain that William Ashton and William Baker  are the other two men. I am not certain that I saw either of these two men, Baker and Ashton that night

/signed/ Thomas Smith

Sworn before me at Launceston the twenty seventh day of September 1828 and read to the Deponent in the presence and hearing of William Ashton William baker and JOhn Gibson and Joseph Moulds

/Signed/ PA Mulgrave

p226

Van Diemens Land

To Wit

the information of Benedict Von Bibra who being first duly sworn saith, I reside upon the western Bank of the Macquarie River between Mr Corneys and Mr Simpsons farms last night about eight o clock I was sitting in one of the rooms of the House when I heard the dogs bark. I told my brother Charles to go out and see what they were barking at he had no sooner  put his  head out of the door than two men armed with Guns, one of whom had also a brace of horse pistols  slung round him rushed in and told me to stand, at the same time asking me who was in the House besides I told them there was no one in but my mother my two young brothers and myself, I do not know who these two men were, I never saw either of them before – they were each dressed in a fustian jacket and trowsers with handkerchiefs round their necks and had black beaver hats on – they asked if I had any fire arms, I said I had not they said they knew I had and ordered me to produce what I had – they then asked if I had any kangaroo Dogs, I told them I had one which they said they must have – they then  looked round the room and took down a sword which was hanging upon a short belt – they then sent me

p227

out to look for the dog, one of them went out with me – as soon as I got outside of the door, I saw two other armed men who went our with me, tied a string round his neck – I then went into the House again and the man who went out with me followed me in and then another man came in who was also armed with a Gun, he was dressed in a blue jacket and had an oilskin cap  on. I did not notice his trowsers. This last man had formerly been an assigned servant to my Mother his surname is Gibson, I do no know his Christian name – there armed men brought with them a man named Thomas whose surname I do not know he is shepherd to Mr Robert Taylor who lives next to me – he had no arms and was placed in a corner of the room by the two armed men who first entered the House then they had been at my House about half an hour the man who remained outside called out “come on” and the other three armed men then left the House with Mr Taylor’s man taking with them a sword  value ten shillings a patent shot belt value ten shillings

p228

a kangaroo dog for which I have been offered ‘five pounds, my property, all of which they feloniously and forcibly carried away with them – just about day light this morning I heard a shot fired I supposed that the Bushrangers or robbers were returning and shortly afterwards three armed men and a man without armed knocked aty my window and desired me to get up, I got up and found it was a Constable named White whose Christian name I do not know but who is stationed  at Mr Sutherlands JP and two men who from their caps I took for soldiers – the man without arms was Mr Taylors Shepherd who had left me House with the four robbers as already stated – White told me that he had killed two ducks which I might have if I would fetch them out  of the river on looking for them I found  that he had shot one of my tame ducks – White told me that Mr Corney had been robbed and that the Busrhangers had remained there hours – they then went away towards Mr Corneys, one my way to Woolmers I met Mr Corney and these last four men Mr Corney told me that the robbers had taken a quantity of plate and other

p229

things from him – They then left me and went on towards my House – I crossed at Mr Corney’s canoe and came straight to Woolmers – I am quite positive that these Bushrangers did not cross the Macquarie river in my canoe and the river is not fordable anywhere Mr Simpson has a Canoe and I believe Mr Bailes has one and if they did not cross by one of those  canoes I think they must have gone over the Bridge near Doctor Turnbulls

Before me this 9th day of July 1828

signed B v Bibra

/sd/ Thomas Archer

£100 in margin

The further information of Mr Benedict Von Bibra who being sworn saith the foregoing information which has now been sent to me is true, I believe that William Baker and Joseph Moulds were the two men who came into my mother’s house on the night of the Eighth of July John Gibson came in afterwards he had a Gun William Baker and Joseph Moulds had each a Gun I think it was baker who took my sword down and my shot belt and took them away. Gibson came in afterwards there was another man at the Door taller than either

p230

of the other three I am not certain that William Ashton was that man I do not know that I saw him there that night the shot belt was mine the sword belonged to my mother Elizabeth Von Bibra the Dog was mine

B Von Bibra

Sworn before me at Launceston the 27th of September 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of  William Baker William Ashton John Gibson and Joseph Moulds

p231 (oct 1828 in blue pencil)

The information on oath of Robert Petty Stewart Esquire who deposeth and saith I received this letter on the eighth of September by post which I believe is signed by Mr Peter Harrison the Innkeeper and Jericho informing me that a man named Edward Miller had uttered and broken   for one pound which he said had been signed by me at the Barrack Gate in Hobart Town, I never gave an  order on Mr Harrison for any sum of money whatever I do not know that I ever saw Edward Miller before and never had nay dealing with him or authorized him directly or indirectly to take up goods or contract other debt on my account

signed  RP Stewart

Sworn before me at Launceston the 14th of October 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of\

Edward Miller

Signed PA Mulgrave

The further information of RP Stewart Esquire who saith I verily believe that the real name of Edward Miller otherwise Henry Ladervig is John Hawkes and that

p232

he was a Private soldier in the 40th Regiment and my servant upwards of four years I then discharged him and he returned to his regimental duty. I was then in the Portuguese service and I heard that he was wounded in the knew at the Battle of Salamanca invalided and sent home there is a scar upon his right knee.

RP Stewart

Sworn before me at Launceston the 14th of October 1828 and read to the deponent in the presence and hearing of\

Edward Miller

p233

The examination on oath of Edward Miller charged with feloniously uttering  as true a forged order for one pound purporting to be drawn by RP Stewart Esquire on Mr Peter Harrison of Jericho knowing the same to be forged with intent to defraud the said Peter Harrison who having been cautioned not to say any thing prejudicial to his case saith my real name is Henry Ladervig I was born in the city of Rochester. My father was a master confectioner there his shop was opposite the Bulls Inn when I was about seven years of age  I was taken from my father by one Mr Gordon who kept the new Inn at Gravesend where I remained until I was about fourteen years old when I was apprenticed to one Mr Simpson a Baker and confectioner in Tooley Street when I was out of my time I entered on board the William Pitt East Indiaman commanded by Captain Graham and went to Calcutta where I left the ship and went into the service of a merchant named Horton who was sometimes called Catton and

p234

after I had been in Calcutta four years I went with my master to Singapore and after I had been there with his fifteen months I left Mr Horton and entered into the service of General Ochterloney. I remained with him eleven months when being very ill I returned to England in the Marchioness of Exeter and arrived at Blackwall in July 1813 I remained in England fifteen months and was employed as an assistance to the messman of the second Battalion of the 36th Regiment then quartered at Colchester, I saw my father once during that time but no other part of my family I embarked with the Regiment at Harwich in August or September 1814 we landed at Corunnu and remained with the Regiment between ten and eleven months when I fell sick and left the Regiment near St JAgo and returned to England in the Transport Robert NX no 50 in January 1815 I sent to my Father who came to me and gave me eleven pounds and said I must go and do the best I could for myself and must not come near his house again because my stepmother and I could never agree I

p235

went to Ipswich in Suffolk and worked with a man named Collier a Confectioner in Water Lane when I was convicted of stealing some gingerbread the property of my master and transported to Van Diemen’s Land for seven years my servitude expired on the 13th of July last at Maria Island where I had been sent for drunkenness I then went to Hobart Town but could get no work and wages were very low and after I had been there about three weeks I heard that wages were better in Launceston and I heard that my sister Mary Ann was living near Launceston with Captain Stewart and I thought she might do something for me when I got to Jericho I was without money and I gave Mr Harrison the Innkeeper an order drawn my me on Mr Stewart and signed Edward Miller in payment for board and lodging I did not tell Mr Harrison that I got the order from Captain Stewart at the Barrack Gate at  Hobart Town I have been in the neighbourhood of Launceston about a fortnight but have not seen or attempted to see Mrs

p236

Stewart or captain Stewart. I have told a great number of people that she is my sister, it is fifteen or sixteen years ago since I  saw her, she was the daughter of my step mother . I did not change my name until I got into trouble and I then gave my name is Edward Miller, Miller was my mothers name, I did not think  there was any harm in giving Mr Harrison the order upon Mrs Stewart, I meant to have called upon her and told her of it so soon as I had turned myself round and got decent clothes, I do not know the maiden name of my step mother, I never saw my father’s father or mother I do not know that my grand mother married after my grand fathers death. I never was in the service of Captain Stewart in my life I never was a soldier the wound in my right knee was caused by a kick from a horse belonging to Captain Carruthers of the 43rd foot at Batangu and I am still lame from that wound if I walk far or fast I left some things in a Box in Hobart Town

p237

in charge of a Baker named Sefton in Elizabeth Street, he has the key of that Box it only contains papers.

signed

Edward Henry Laidwig

Taken before me at Launceston the fourteenth day of October 1828 and read to the Examinant before he signed it

signed

PA Mulgrave

p238

The information on oath of Patrick Carlin a Colour Serjeant in His Majesty’s 40th regiment who saith, I was pay serjeant to Robert Petty Stewart who was a Captain in the 40th Regiment for several months within the last two years, I have frequently seen him write and sign his name, I am persuaded that no part of this order in favour of Edward Miller has the least appearance of Captain Stewart’s handwriting it is very different from his usual handwriting and to the best of my belief it was not written by him

Patrick Carlin

Col Secy H E

£100 PAM

p239

Sworn before me at Launceston the 24th of December 1828 and read to the deponent deponent before he signed it

PA Mulgrave

(unreadable in pencil)

Copies of informations

v S Miller

October 1828

p240

Police Office

Campbell Town

29th Dec 1828

Information of Thomas William Massey of Ben Lomond on oath – about seven months back I sold fifty head of cattle belonging to Charles Fletcher  Howard by auction the greater part of which were purchased by John Warner known by the name of Smutty Jack residing near Launceston – the cattle were all marked CH – Warner after  he purchased them marked them with the letter IW – Some few of them returned to the run almost immediately afterward. I informed Warner that the cattle had returned and fixed a day for his drawing them out of the herd – I also told him some of them were not branded – no one attended at the time appointed to draw them off, since then I have been informed that he had been drawing them off on the seen?? without my consent – George Richards and Henry Boyle assisted Warner in drawing them off til the time the stock were driven off a  cow and calf belonging to Charles Fletcher Howard were taken with them, which in consequence of knocking up, were left by Warner in the

p241

care of Samuel Porter? at the Springs near Launceston – Porter/Patten assisted me in taking the fifty head cattle in, and observing this cow and calf were not of the numbers sold by me refused to give them up to Warner stating this as his reason for refusing – the cow and calf are now in the possession of Porter/Patten – the cattle were driven away without my consent or knowledge and I have no hesitation in stating my belief that the cow and calf were taken with the intention of slatering them – I cannot fix an exact date when the cattle were driven from the run but it must be  about the Tenth of the present month

WM Massey (signed)

Sworn before me

this twenty ninth day of December 182eight

James Simpson

Police Magistrate

p242

Thomas W Massey

Cow and Calf

December 1828

(Campbell Town in pencil)

p242

Police Office

Campbell Town 29th Dec 1828

Thomas Davies free on oath – I am overseer to Thomas Massey of Ben Lomond about seven months since I assisted in driving fifty head of cattle the property of Charles Fletcher Howard a into Launceston for Sale – They were sold by auction the greater part were purchased by a man nicknamed Smutty Jack who resides near the Smiths farm at the Cocked Hat Hill – some of the cattle returned to Mr Masseys run most of them being branded IW there was one cow not branded last Tuesday in going to Launceston I called and Samuel Patins told me that there was a cow and calf on their farm which her husband ad stopt as it belongs to Charles Feltcher Howard – it was brought there by Smutty Jack George Richards and Henry Boyle with some cattle that they were bringing from Mr Massey’s – I afterwards met Samuel Porter/Patten and he confirmed what his wife had told me – on  Saturday morning last on my return from Launceston I saw the Cow and Calf  at Porter/Pattens – I can swear positively that the cow belongs to Charles Fletcher Howard she is branded  CH – she has a calf by her side – I do positively swear that she is not one of the fifty head of cattle lately sold by Mr Massey at Launceston

Thomas Davis

his X mark

DA Skiving witness

Sworn before me this twenty ninth day

of December 182 eight

James Simpson

Police Magistrate

END of BOX 1 – End of Vol 1


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5 responses to “ms 3251 1827-1828 box 1 vol 1

  1. What a lot of work now I know what all those questions were for.

    Will look forward to reading what you have done

    Irene

  2. Congratulations on a stunning accomplishment…I was able to locate incredibly detailed new information on ‘my’ bushranger, William Ashton, within moments, in 1827-1828, Box 1, Vol. 1.
    I’m yet to look in the other volume selected…I’m sure I’ll just as delighted when I do.
    I’m unsure of what sort of information you’re looking for re. this man, however, so will wait to read the comments of others, before I post any details of William Ashton’s life.
    One again, thankyou so much for providing this superb resource.
    Carol Brill.

  3. And thank you from me too Julie. Its a stunning job and so valuable to have all this detailed information online. I, too, found several men from the Sir William Bensley which was one of ‘my’ ships in Australia’s Birthstain.
    Congratulations on a great job.

  4. Amazing stuff. Congratulations on your great work.

  5. Hey, thanks a lot Jenny. ps: If you find anything useful, or have anything to add about any of the people or events in ms3251 please leave any further info in a message so the site increases in value. Julie

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